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Help, need simple activities for hubby while I'm at work
Internal Administrator
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: baubri3

Hey everyone,
I am just looking for suggestions that don't require a lot of reasoning that might help keep my husband from being bored while I am at work. He's mild to mod and functions pretty independently, but has a lot of trouble with reasoning and needs help with a lot of the activities he tries...just thought someone else might have some ideas that I haven't thought of.
THanks so much!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: NanaLinda

Have similar problem with hubby. he is still driving very short distances. So far, so good. He will do small things around the house, vacuum, etc. if I leave a note and he doesn't forget where he put it. I would like to find a project for him but have no idea what. He won't go to the Senior Center because they are "old" people.(he's 83)
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: kevinsgirl

How do you get them hooked into these ideas? My FIL is in the same stage--but he's never done anything but farm. He has no hobbies. No interests to speak of. I think he spends all his time sorting the mail. Seriously.

He gets rude and belligerent/defensive really easily.

THANK YOU.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: younghope1

Baubri, there are lots of things your husband can do. If you have laundry to do, make sure it is dry before you go to work and put it on the table for him to fold. Can he still wash dishes? He could dust, it may not seem like alot but it keeps him active and gives him a purpose. Have him clip coupons, it doesn't matter if they ar the right ones or not you can always take out the wrong ones later. Is there a hobby that he use to enjoy that is reasonable and he can still do it? Just ideas of some things I can still do.

Tracy
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: baubri3

I appreciate you're delema. It sounds just like mine. My husband isn't ready for a sitter or anything like that....but there really isn't anywhere for him to go (he is only 55). With so many people going through all of this, you'd think there would be more places or programs.hm
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: Nevada Rose

I have a Thomas Kinkaid puzzle I set out for my mom......it is there whenever she wants to work with it....its also addicting. She works on it each time she comes to the table.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: pak

I have the same concern with my husband. He sounds about in the same place as yours.

Before I go to work I try and make a list of very simple things he can do around the house and then I call him during the day to see how he is doing.

Most times, he doesn't get much done, but at least it is something he can start on.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: Darryl-W

Is another woman out of the question? Sorry I am just joking.

Check with scheduled activity by the Alz Assoc office closet. I am fortunate enough to have one near enough where I live. Some of my new friends with alz are in groups or start small groups with help of their nearest Alz Assoc office.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: kipi

Just some ideas for you & others:
My mother loves to feel useful around the house. She doesn't remember the towels that she folded the other day are the same ones in the drier again, but it's harmless & an activity she can handle. I just pull them back out of the closet every few days & throw them back in the drier.
In the morning before I leave for work, I make breakfast for her. She sits facing the tv. I put the religious channel on so she can watch the morning (Catholic) mass. This works for her because she has become more spiritual & it reflects in her behaviour.
Other activities: she loves to sweep the floors. The broom is handy & she just goes to town whenever she feels like it. My house is very clean anyway, but when I come home, I always comment on how really clean it looks because she swept. My garage has the cleanest floor in the neighborhood.
I'm looking for more ideas, because one day she'll catch on. The coupons are a good idea. I never think to use them, but it's great busy work for her.
Any more activities from others are welcome!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: baubri3

Thanks, I'll check it out!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: Bettyhere

There are countless activity books for AD patients. Find them at agelessdesign.com or Amazon. Good luck. This is a difficult problem, I know.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: tiffany9800

my nanny is 87 and when she is at my house i always let her fold my towels. The first few times she didn't do the best job, but no way would i tell her, last weekend she folded them like she would of years ago, i was soo proud of her. I will let her wash a few dishes and she is still very sharp w/ math, so she helps the kids w/ math problems. She can't remeber 10 minutes ago, but she can remember multiplication!!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: KCCullen

try simple activities such as sandpaper and wood
or putting pieces of plastic pipe together depending on his work or social history is how to asses what to do. Just ripping out coupons is good. Stuffing envelopes, put on a sports video, or a movie. Hope this helps
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

Re books, I just got "Alzheimer's Activities -- Hundreds of Activities for Men and Women with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Volume 1" by B.J. FitzRay. I've only had a chance to skim it, but it looks great.

This subject comes up a lot. From one of the threads I liked the most for people in the earlier stages, who are still pretty functional:

Alzheimer's is a progressive disease. A person with Alzheimer's most often goes further back in time the more the disease progress. If your dad is in the space of time where work was his focus, go with that. What did he do for a living and what can you safely modify about his work that he can feel successful with? If you can bring his work to him, you most probably will relieve some of his anxiety. I have worked with Alzheimer's for many years in an activity capacity, and one thing that works is to go into their world, because that is their reality

My FIL, Old Navy, tends to drift off to the time he was in the Navy back near the end of WWII. He used to work in the engine room, and will tell me that he can't leave his station without the Captain's permission.

Most of his job was making sure certain valves were opened and closed at precisely the right time, so we are in the process of creating a board with things that need to be turned or twisted. Don't know if that will work, but I'm having a heck of a good time, getting things together for DH to attach to the board!

Other times, I tell him I'm a new recruit and need to learn my way around the engine room. So he will actually walk with me down the 'passageways' pointing out the various equipment in the engine room... and even show me how it works (it's all in his head, but in his mind, that is what he sees). By the time we've done a recon of the passageways, he's ready to settle down to keep watch on the boilers.


What came to mind was perhaps getting some books on the navy and his job so that you can go over the books with him and he can "instruct" you as part of his job. I love the idea about constructing something that he can turn things on and off. Great idea!

Cut the following link and paste it in your browser bar...

http://www.thealzheimersstore.com/Shop/Category.php?CategoryID=10

There is a "Handyman Box" that comes in small and large that several on this forum have mentioned in the past. Also there is the "Plumbers Pal" that might work. Not a lot of items geared specifically for men, but most are "unisex".

What about creating a "memory book" of things you do on the farm?!? Along with that....maybe he could watch some videos of different farm activities!

My former MIL has lost interest in everything, too, in terms of keeping her busy. But I found she loves to dig in dirt. She's an old farm gal so we go out to her patio where she can plant, transplant, replant, whatever all the little plants she wants. I tried silk plants so they wouldn't die but she'll have nothing to do with "fake plants - that's the problem with everything today, it's all fake". Pretty profound for Stage 6, huh?! Anyway, we just replace the plants with new ones every couple of weeks, they're only $.69 each!

If he says "he has to go to work"..... what was his profession? is it possible to get him something to "work at"?
such as: a banker: play money
a grocery person: play meats and veggies
an accountant: paper, calculator, receipts


Good luck!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:36 AM
Originally posted by: Molly Schaffer

We got my grandpa into listening to books on tape that he can check out from his local library. It keeps him occupied for a while.