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What can we do besides sit in front of the TV
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: Nancy Jane

Hello
I have my 85 year old mother living with us. I am the daughter. She has dementia probably a later stage - she still knows who most of us are and seems to be half in this world and have out. Very sad. Can anyone tell me activities we can do with her during the day. She use to be a very active person and now it is hard. She has a hip and back problem so that limits her. She gets upset when she has to just sit in front of the TV but I don't know what to do. I have tried to re teach her knitting but that did not work. We do have her doing "word searchs" again but how long can you do those. Any suggestions would be so appreciated. Thank you.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

Would she enjoy simple puzzles? My sister loves having a fabric book. She can rub each sample and feel the different textures.

They do seem to like to sort or go through things. Could she help with any household tasks and still keep busy. e.g., put away the silverware? The books should give you lots of ideas.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: DLMifm

http://carersdandyfunk.blogspot.com/
Carer Dandyfunk In-home activities for caregivers



quote:
Originally posted by Nancy Jane:
Hello
I have my 85 year old mother living with us. I am the daughter. She has dementia probably a later stage - she still knows who most of us are and seems to be half in this world and have out. Very sad. Can anyone tell me activities we can do with her during the day. She use to be a very active person and now it is hard. She has a hip and back problem so that limits her. She gets upset when she has to just sit in front of the TV but I don't know what to do. I have tried to re teach her knitting but that did not work. We do have her doing "word searchs" again but how long can you do those. Any suggestions would be so appreciated. Thank you.

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: Butchie

My wife will spend hours going thru boxes/baskets of stuff. Beads, trinkets, cards, little boxes with notes in them to find, etc. Picture albums with the names of each person on a sticker above thier head. Computer screensaver with pictures of various stuff including family & friends helps them remember people places & things. I bought an iPad & have aquariums & simple games on it for her to play with. I also keep our schedule on the calendar so she can see what we will be doing & who is going to be visiting. I have to start it but she will spend hours feeding the fish.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

The right music may perk her up a bit. First big hit for my life partner, about the same age: "Music That Got Us Through World War II."

There are some good books on activities for people with Alzheimer's, and some articles online, but I've had the best luck three ways:

1) Browsing newstand magazine racks. A couple of years ago, when first casting about for ideas, I saw a magazine on paper crafts that featured collage cards. I brought it home, it struck a spark, and I quickly started filling in supplies. My partner now talks about "good, today I can spend time at my desk" where she makes collage cards nearly every day. At first someone had to work with her all the time; now she can often spend half an hour to an hour doing it with just a few "look at this?" or "where's the....?"

2) Browse the toy aisles. This can be a lot of fun! Some ideas will strike a spark, others will be duds. Eventually you'll find things your mom enjoys. Toys seem to backfire for some people who feel insulted, but I'm lucky that my partner takes them in stride. (She can always save face by saying she's trying them out for the great-grandkids.)

3) Thinking about what my partner used to enjoy, not just recently but early on. Example: she played the trap drum in her hs marching band some 70 years ago. I got her a snare drum and she loved it, and this past Christmas she got a full drum set. She plays it nearly every day, to various music from Sousa to salsa.

It takes time to try things, and for a while your mom may need someone doing everything WITH her. That means a lot of housework doesn't get done, but the stage when your mom can do things won't last forever. And you'll probably need help -- other people to do things with her -- paid or volunteer.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: Hope A

We play catch with a soft ball for 15 to 20 minutes.
I take him outside. While I am watering my plants he is listening to his favorite music.(Oldies)
Before disease, he use to collect comic books, so what I do give him one each day and he goes through the whole book.
I take him outside daily, there's times that I take him walking around the block, I push his wheel chair.
We have grandchildren in baseball and there's games 3 or 4 a week, so we go watch them.
He also has his favorite t.v. shows that he likes, so while he is doing this I am doing household chores.
There's times you have to work around them, but he comes first in my book.
On Easter, yearly we have an Easter Egg Hunt for my grandchildren, my LO use to help hiding the candies, etc.
This year was a little rough, I wheeled him around while he hid the Easter Eggs.
We always have games/prizes for the children.
Include your LO on different things and maybe she will surprise you.
My Lo still recognizes the family, so we need to take advantage while we still have them with us.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

Some of the better discussions we've had on this subject in the past:
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...=896308314#896308314
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...14102241/m/810303714
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...52104903/m/747309324
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...864054387#4864054387

DLFimf, I was skimming the Dandyfunk website. I noticed Pogo.com. Our members who have AD have talked about that site quite a bit.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

My DH likes to watch the radio channel on Comcast. It plays the Oldies and shows the album cover of the artist with some trivia written about it.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

My DH was told by his neurologist, in the beginning, 'your brain is shrinking a lot'....

From that I told him that working puzzles are good for the neurons and synapses in his brain!
He'd never been a big puzzle guy, sure he helped the kids when they were little but this was new to him.

We finally settled on the 300 pc EZ Grasp puzzles from Target or KMart. However, I was lucky to find them at thrift shops too!!

He set up a card table in front of the TV and either has CMT (country western station) or the Oldies Radio Station on Comcast playing in the background. He takes him 6-8 hrs to do one mostly by himself. I walk by once in awhile and add one, but he likes finishing them himself. I always cheer him on and take a photo after he finishes one!

What's good about them is that they usually have something going on all over the piece (last one was a Grandma Moses type of houses and people). Puzzles with lots of water or sky, where there are lots of pieces the same are difficult. They need something where they can succeed.

If I get one that's too hard for him, I put them aside and then periodically I donate them to a local rehab center.

He used to be a voracious reader of mysteries, but gradually went down to easier books like the Hardy Boys or even Nancy Drew. Now he no longer tries. He can read the headlines in the newspaper but no longer even tries the sports page.

He's losing interest in the puzzles now that Spring is here and has done some things in the yard, but I notice he does a lot of standing and leaning on the rake, or the shovel. I'm sure going to miss him doing the lawn mowing for me!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: GE

My 76 year old husband is in the last stage of Alzheimer's. He can hardly do anything. But he loves to listen to serons on line. He particularly loves our pastor's sermons. Even if he has heard them before it doesn't matter. He laso like listening to the Bible on CD's. He used to put pictures in his own albums and that took him 6 months but he cannot do that anymore. He also used to do mosaics where you take broken pieces of china and glue them to something , then grout it. He has done some beautiful pieces and there is not "right" way to do it. Hope this helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: Rose_Ro

quote:
Originally posted by Nancy Jane:
Hello
I have my 85 year old mother living with us. I am the daughter. She has dementia probably a later stage - she still knows who most of us are and seems to be half in this world and have out. Very sad. Can anyone tell me activities we can do with her during the day. She use to be a very active person and now it is hard. She has a hip and back problem so that limits her. She gets upset when she has to just sit in front of the TV but I don't know what to do. I have tried to re teach her knitting but that did not work. We do have her doing "word searchs" again but how long can you do those. Any suggestions would be so appreciated. Thank you.


Is she on any AD memory meds?

My mom likes to rip up paper, call people, organize things ''her'' way, rest and talk to me while resting, ...

walking if she can would be good for her hip and back, I think...

She's able to read short articles in magazines and books, make notes, fold clothes, bag things to give away,

My mom was never much of a crafts person, she liked to work (for money!)...

She likes to get the clothes together to be washed (although I do that), she does the dishes, puts things away from the dishwasher...
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:19 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

GE, it's been a very long time since your last post. Eeker Have you been lurking all this time?