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Brushing Your Teeth May Lower Dementia Risk
Myriam
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2012 7:41 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


From Alzheimer's Daily News:


(Source: Huffington Post) - According to a recent study from the University of California, daily brushing is associated with a lower risk of developing dementia.


Go to full story: http://www.huffingtonpost.com


Swarfmaker
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2012 3:45 PM
Joined: 3/28/2012
Posts: 13


I know we discussed this before, but here it is again for those who may have missed it.

 

I also looked into how to kill off these bacteria, and found that something in green tea was effective.  A cup of green tea a day?  Swish and swallow?  I could handle that.  Also, brushing with baking soda (not necessarily replacing the use of regular toothpaste) is said to make one's mouth inhospitable to several types of bacteria.

 

 Alzheimer's disease - a neurospirochetosis. Analysis of the evidence following Koch's and Hill's criteria.

Judith Miklossy

Correspondence: Judith Miklossy
Journal of Neuroinflammation 2011, 8:90 doi:10.1186/1742-2094-8-90

Published: 4 August 2011

Abstract (provisional)

It is established that chronic spirochetal infection can cause slowly progressive dementia, brain atrophy and amyloid deposition in late neurosyphilis.

Recently it has been suggested that various types of spirochetes, in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum, could cause dementia and may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Here, we review all data available in the literature on the detection of spirochetes in AD and critically analyze the association and causal relationship between spirochetes and AD following established criteria of Koch and Hill.

The results show a statistically significant association between spirochetes and AD (P = 1.5 x 10-17, OR = 20, 95% CI = 8-60, N = 247).
When neutral techniques recognizing all types of spirochetes were used, or the highly prevalent periodontal pathogen Treponemas were analyzed, spirochetes were observed in the brain in more than 90% of AD cases.

Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in the brain in 25.3% of AD cases analyzed and was 13 times more frequent in AD compared to controls.

Periodontal pathogen Treponemas (T. pectinovorum, T. amylovorum, T. lecithinolyticum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. socranskii) and Borrelia burgdorferi were detected using species specific PCR and antibodies.

Importantly, co-infection with several spirochetes occurs in AD.

The pathological and biological hallmarks of AD were reproduced in vitro.

The analysis of reviewed data following Koch's and Hill's postulates shows a probable causal relationship between neurospirochetosis and AD.

Persisting inflammation and amyloid deposition initiated and sustained by chronic spirochetal infection form together with the various hypotheses suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD a comprehensive entity.

As suggested by Hill, once the probability of a causal relationship is established prompt action is needed.

Support and attention should be given to this field of AD research.

Spirochetal infection occurs years or decades before the manifestation of dementia.

As adequate antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies are available, as in syphilis, one might prevent and eradicate dementia.

...

Conclusion

Various types of spirochetes, including B. burgdorferi, and six periodontal pathogen spirochetes ((T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, T. denticola, T. medium, T. amylovorum and T. maltophilum) were detected in the brains of AD patients.

The pathological and biological hallmarks of AD, including increased AβPP level, Aβ deposition and tau phosphorylation were induced by spirochetes in vitro.

The statistical analysis showed a significant association between spirochetes and AD. The strongly significant association, the high risk factor and the analysis of data following Koch’s and Hill’s criteria, are indicative of a causal relationship between neurospirochetoses and AD.

Spirochetes are able to escape destruction by the host immune reactions and establish chronic infection and sustained inflammation.

In vivo studies with long exposure times will be necessary to efficiently study the sequence of events and the cellular mechanisms involved in spirochete induced AD-type host reactions and Aβ-plaque, “tangle” and “granulovacuolar” formation.

The characterization of all types of spirochetes and co-infecting bacteria and viruses is needed, in order to develop serological tests for the early detection of infection.

The pathological process is thought to begin long before the diagnosis of dementia is made therefore, an appropriate targeted treatment should start early in order to prevent dementia.

Persisting spirochetal infection and their persisting toxic components can initiate and sustain chronic inflammatory processes through the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system involving various signaling pathways.

In the affected brain the pathogens and their toxic components can be observed, along with host immunological responses.

The response itself is characteristic of chronic inflammatory processes associated with the site of tissue damage.

The outcome of infection is determined by the genetic predisposition of the patient, by the virulence and biology of the infecting agent
and by various environmental factors, such as exercise, stress and nutrition.

The accumulated knowledge, the various views, and hypotheses proposed to explain the pathogenesis of AD form together a comprehensive entity when observed in the light of a persisting chronic inflammation and amyloid deposition initiated and sustained by chronic spirochetal infection.

As suggested by Hill, once the probability of a causal relationship is established prompt action is needed. Similarly to syphilis, one may prevent and eradicate dementia in AD.

The impact on healthcare costs and on the suffering of the patients would be substantial.
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/8/1/90/abstract
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/pdf/1742-2094-8-90.pdf


Alzheimer's disease - a neurospirochetosis. Analysis of the evidence following Koch's and Hill's criteria.
Miklossy J.
J Neuroinflammation. 2011 Aug 4;8(1):90. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

ABSTRACT: It is established that chronic spirochetal infection can cause slowly progressive dementia, brain atrophy and amyloid deposition in late neurosyphilis. Recently it has been suggested that various types of spirochetes, in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum, could cause dementia and may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we review all data available in the literature on the detection of spirochetes in AD and critically analyze the association and causal relationship between spirochetes and AD following established criteria of Koch and Hill. The results show a statistically significant association between spirochetes and AD (P = 1.5 x 10-17, OR = 20, 95% CI = 8-60, N = 247). When neutral techniques recognizing all types of spirochetes were used, or the highly prevalent periodontal pathogen Treponemas were analyzed, spirochetes were observed in the brain in more than 90% of AD cases. Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in the brain in 25.3% of AD cases analyzed and was 13 times more frequent in AD compared to controls. Periodontal pathogen Treponemas (T. pectinovorum, T. amylovorum, T. lecithinolyticum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. socranskii) and Borrelia burgdorferi were detected using species specific PCR and antibodies. Importantly, co-infection with several spirochetes occurs in AD. The pathological and biological hallmarks of AD were reproduced in vitro. The analysis of reviewed data following Koch's and Hill's postulates shows a probable causal relationship between neurospirochetosis and AD. Persisting inflammation and amyloid deposition initiated and sustained by chronic spirochetal infection form together with the various hypotheses suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD a comprehensive entity. As suggested by Hill, once the probability of a causal relationship is established prompt action is needed. Support and attention should be given to this field of AD research. Spirochetal infection occurs years or decades before the manifestation of dementia. As adequate antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies are available, as in syphilis, one might prevent and eradicate dementia.

PMID: 21816039 [PubMed]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21816039
More info in the provisional full text pdf:
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/pdf/1742-2094-8-90.pdf
 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2012 4:33 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4863


Spirochetes release phospholipase C and phospholipase C is the trigger for Alzheimer's disease.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC267363/ 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC43811/ 

 

This also explains the potential link between lyme disease (which involves a type of spirochete) and Alzheimer's disease. 

 

Phospholipase C gamma activity can be inhibited by epicatechin in green tea and other polyphenols. Certain phenolic compounds can also kill bacteria.

 

Many factors other than chronic bacterial and viral infections can contribute to phospholipase C activity (high blood glucose levels, angiotensin II, mercury, and aluminium fluoride, for instance).  Certain antibiotics can potentially be used to treat Alzheimer's disease whether the cause is a persistent infection or not, because certain antibiotics are peroxynitrite scavengers, as peroxynitrites are the main cause of Alzheimer's disease.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21081502 

http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/9018471/reload=0;jsessionid=EhDcsia9uNPTkWCdscMo.2 

 

Find the most effective peroxynitrite scavengers and you can partially reverse Alzheimer's disease.

 


Serenoa
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2012 5:55 PM
Joined: 4/24/2012
Posts: 484


I am fascinated with this bacterial hypothesis. Their seems to be good evidence for an association with AD and even a causal relationship. It also fits so well with Lane's PLC-peroxynitrite explanations. The antibiotics don't seem to work by killing the infection, they scavenge peroxynitrites or remove zinc and copper from amyloid placks.

 

From a 2003 study:

“two common antibiotics, taken together, can change the course of Alzheimer's disease and that these changes seem to be long lasting.” “the patients who took the antibiotics had slower mental decline.” "It is a total coincidence that this is an antibiotic," he says. "It's effectiveness has nothing to do with the fact that it kills organisms, and everything to do with the fact that it keeps plaques from forming by pulling the excess copper and zinc out of them."

http://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/news/20031009/antibiotics-may-slow-alzheimers 

 

However there is also evidence that infection by Toxoplasma gondii is actually protective in that it increases anti-inflamatory cytokines.

 

From a 2012 study:

“Our results also show that T. gondii-infected Tg2576 mice exhibited higher levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and TGF-β, in brain tissues, and less neuronal death, amyloid plaque deposition, and neurodegeneration than non-infected mice.”

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0033312

 

It's interesting that the antibiotics used in the above study and the IgIV/Gammagaurd therapy seem to produce similar results, a reduction or halting of the rate of decline, but no reversal. Antibiotics don't seem to be a great treatment for this in that they can't remove the primary cause (brain infection). If they could, someone would have noticed with all the AD patients taking antibiotics for other things (no one is checking out of the Alzheimer's facilities).

 

Also, in one of the zinc studies posted on another string the author claims that AD is a recent phenomenon (last 100 yrs). Why wasn't it more prevalent back when oral hygene was almost non-existant, as spirochetes are found mostly in the mouth?

 

Perhaps a Lime disease treatment method would be more successful involving IV administered antibiotics. Also, how does blood transfusion or neurogenesis fit into this infection hypothesis?

 

 

 

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2012 3:51 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4863


These are great comments and observations, Serenoa.  It is not known yet which chronic bacterial and viral infections can trigger Alzheimer's disease, if any of them can or whether additional risk factors must be present as well.   

 

Certain antibiotics and gammagard may slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease by inhibiting the formation of peroxynitrites.  One way antibiotics may do this (as you noted) is by taking copper and zinc out of plaques because the enzyme (superoxide dismutase) that converts superoxides to hydrogen peroxide requires both zinc and copper; otherwise high levels of the superoxide anions combine with inducible nitric oxide to form peroxynitrites.  

 

High concentrations of peroxynitrite scavenging antibiotics will partially repair the damage done by peroxynitrites (including to adrenergic receptors which are needed for neurogenesis) and thus partially reverse Alzheimer's disease. The following anecdotal reports from the Alzheimer's research forum provides some evidence for this: 

 

Question from Joy K.Posted 20 July 2004  

Has anyone tested the use of antibiotics for Alzheimer's patients? My mother was diagnosed with the disease more than seven years ago. Although she quit after the diagnosis, she was a heavy smoker most of her life, which resulted in congestion problems. Over the last seven years she was given antibiotics several times. Each time her condition improved dramatically. When she stopped the medication she reverted back to the way she was before. She is now in the last stages of her disease and refuses to eat or drink. She was sent to the emergency room and not expected to survive the night. They gave her and antibiotic drip and by the next day she was fighting to go home. She recognized us, was able to put three words together, and understood and responded to everything we said to her. She even played a little joke on my sister, pretending to be dead and then jump up laughing because she scared her.

 

She has not been this responsive in close to a year! I attribute it to the antibiotic drip. In the past when she took antibiotics orally she significantly improved but the drip seemed to really make a huge difference. I hope something can be done to research this. I am trying to tell everyone I can. Please let me know if this has been researched.

 

Reply from Brian Balin, Ph.D., Philadelphia College of Osteopathic MedicinePosted 20 July 2004  

Remarkably, this is something that has been recognized by clinicians for many, many years. I have innumerable accounts from individuals who have reported on exactly the same response. There have been reports back to me of individuals who have not spoken for years that have "recovered" this ability following antibiotic therapy. Is the response specific to treating an infection systemically or in the brain, or does it have to do with an anti-inflammatory action of the antibiotics? We just don't have the answers to these questions at this time. In my estimation, there has to be a mandate in this for performing clinical trials based on the antibiotic approach. Hopefully, we can convince the NIH or big pharma that these trials would be worthwhile.

 

http://www.alzforum.org/res/for/journal/detail.asp?liveID=65 

 

The following comment is from the above forum discussion. 

 

by Donna Walraven, MSW 

 

When my father was alive there was an occasion where he had a serious bladder infection that was finally treated by a urologist.  The urologist gave him powerful antibiotics.  After a few days on these antibiotics my father became lucid for over a week.  He did not know my name before; now he was calling me by name again, and not just responding to question, but actually carrying on a conversation with me. 

 

Loved ones have made similar observation after the use of peroxnynitrite scavenging herbs and essential oils via aromatherapy. 

 

Rosemary for Alzheimer's treatment  


 

My mother is in the final stages of Alzheimer's and was given a rough estimate of only 6 more months of life back in November. As is very common, her condition can change from day to day but still in a general direction for the worse. She reached the point where, if she was even awake at all, she couldn't communicate anymore and hardly showed the sign of being aware of my presence. I've been using alternative medicine for a few years now to treat my depression, anxiety, and also for general health. I've since discovered the overlooked value of the herb Rosemary and now use it to treat the symptoms of my depression. I've also noticed better clarity of thought along with an improved short term memory. I was able to get the doctor's permission to give this herb to my mother and we figured at least it couldn't hurt. Much to my surprise, there's been a noticable change. There have been quite a few day now where my mom has been more focused and alert than she's been in a long time. I even got some news from one of her nurses who said my mother had a brief conversation with her. Its been at least a year or two since I can remember anything like that. This change has also been noticed by others on the nursing staff as well as her doctor, who is very surprised. Now I'm not suggesting this is any kind of a "cure" for Alzheimer's but the improvement in my mother's condition is something to be said about Rosemary and it's given me some more quality time with her that I thought had been thing of the past.........Gary
 
And 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKN3DGxl06o 

 

I not only trust these anecdotal reports, I know part of the science behind them.  The most important point is that Alzheimer's disease can be reversed even in the late stages.

 

 

 

 


onward
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2012 1:19 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


 

For anyone interested, here are some lengthy, related discussions.  Probably none of us would agree with everything said in these discussions, but they do have intriguing information and suggestions:


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2769347/posts

http://www.alzconnected.org/archive.aspx?g=posts&t=34380