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Humor. In almost anything.
Jim Broede
Posted: Sunday, April 22, 2018 3:31 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


Sometimes I write and do stuff meant to be funny. But it’s taken seriously. That’s the funny part. It’s called a put-on. With tongue-in-cheek. I say it with straight-face. Friends generally know I’m kidding. But I pull the stunt. With strangers, too. That’s more a gamble. They eventually catch on. And know what to expect next time. I like to keep people guessing. Though I prefer to keep them laughing. My message. Life wasn’t always meant to be taken seriously. One can find humor. In almost anything. --Jim


ruthmendez
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:31 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2330


One time I overheard my father laughing to himself in his bedroom.  Good thing he doesn't realize his situation.  Makes this road a little easier.
chrisp1653
Posted: Friday, April 27, 2018 11:35 PM
Joined: 1/23/2017
Posts: 1296


So all this time you were hiding your tongue in your cheek, Jim. I thought so !
TiggerPooh
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 8:30 AM
Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 94


Jim Broede wrote:

 

Sometimes I write and do stuff meant to be funny. But it’s taken seriously. That’s the funny part. It’s called a put-on. With tongue-in-cheek. I say it with straight-face. Friends generally know I’m kidding. But I pull the stunt. With strangers, too. That’s more a gamble. They eventually catch on. And know what to expect next time. I like to keep people guessing. Though I prefer to keep them laughing. My message. Life wasn’t always meant to be taken seriously. One can find humor. In almost anything. --Jim

 


Jim -- I thought your psychologist friend told you not to do that on a website devoted to people with alzheimer's and related dementias, and those in the middle of caring for those people. What happened? Just having another bad day?
Jim Broede
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:26 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


TiggerPooh wrote:
Jim Broede wrote:

 

Sometimes I write and do stuff meant to be funny. But it’s taken seriously. That’s the funny part. It’s called a put-on. With tongue-in-cheek. I say it with straight-face. Friends generally know I’m kidding. But I pull the stunt. With strangers, too. That’s more a gamble. They eventually catch on. And know what to expect next time. I like to keep people guessing. Though I prefer to keep them laughing. My message. Life wasn’t always meant to be taken seriously. One can find humor. In almost anything. --Jim

 


Jim -- I thought your psychologist friend told you not to do that on a website devoted to people with alzheimer's and related dementias, and those in the middle of caring for those people. What happened? Just having another bad day?

 

 
 

 

Haven’t you noticed? I don’t always follow the advice of other people.  I’m inclined to challenge so-called expert advice. I experiment. And often enough discover that their advice was wrong. Humor. Humor works.  Often. With people with dementia. Helps them relax. Especially in the early and mid-stages. Please, don’t underestimate the dementia mind. It can be stimulated. In all sorts of ways. Sometimes, even in advanced stages. Sometimes, all it takes is a breath of fresh air. And physical movement.  And an outing with a comedian. I work with the dementia-riddled. Almost every day. And I get positive results. --Jim

 

 

TiggerPooh
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:33 AM
Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 94


Jim Broede wrote:
TiggerPooh wrote:
Jim Broede wrote:

 

Sometimes I write and do stuff meant to be funny. But it’s taken seriously. That’s the funny part. It’s called a put-on. With tongue-in-cheek. I say it with straight-face. Friends generally know I’m kidding. But I pull the stunt. With strangers, too. That’s more a gamble. They eventually catch on. And know what to expect next time. I like to keep people guessing. Though I prefer to keep them laughing. My message. Life wasn’t always meant to be taken seriously. One can find humor. In almost anything. --Jim

 


Jim -- I thought your psychologist friend told you not to do that on a website devoted to people with alzheimer's and related dementias, and those in the middle of caring for those people. What happened? Just having another bad day?

 

 
 

 

Haven’t you noticed? I don’t always follow the advice of other people.  I’m inclined to challenge so-called expert advice. I experiment. And often enough discover that their advice was wrong. Humor. Humor works.  Often. With people with dementia. Helps them relax. Especially in the early and mid-stages. Please, don’t underestimate the dementia mind. It can be stimulated. In all sorts of ways. Sometimes, even in advanced stages. Sometimes, all it takes is a breath of fresh air. And physical movement.  And an outing with a comedian. I work with the dementia-riddled. Almost every day. And I get positive results. --Jim

 

 

Ah, I forgot your gift with the "dementia-riddled" Jim. When have you worked with the "dementia-riddled" recently, Jim?
TiggerPooh
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:37 AM
Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 94


Whoops, I forgot a comma in my first sentence of my response to you. Not like me, careful as I am with grammar most of the time. But I hope you think it is funny, since I too can be funny, and find humor in almost anything, though I find poking fun at people who are in the midst of dementia themselves or caring for a person with dementia, to not be very funny.
Jim Broede
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 1:29 PM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


I have many dementia-riddled friends. I never go more than a few days without seeing them. One. I took for walks. Almost daily. For years. Until he died. By the way, he appreciated my humor. I inherited his $6,000 hearing aids. I'm wearing then now. Listening to the singing birds. By the way. That was the only payment I received. As his care-giver. My practice is to work for free. An unpaid volunteer.  My rewards come in other meaningful ways. I'm really a nice fellow, if I may say so. Come visit me some day. You'll become a believer. --Jim
Sunrise-Addict
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 1:53 PM
Joined: 3/26/2018
Posts: 49


Jim Broede wrote:

 

Sometimes I write and do stuff meant to be funny. But it’s taken seriously. That’s the funny part. It’s called a put-on. With tongue-in-cheek. I say it with straight-face. Friends generally know I’m kidding. But I pull the stunt. With strangers, too. That’s more a gamble. They eventually catch on. And know what to expect next time. I like to keep people guessing. Though I prefer to keep them laughing. My message. Life wasn’t always meant to be taken seriously. One can find humor. In almost anything. --Jim

 


I don't believe this. You try to get a rise out of people. Sometimes it works. You just love that don't you.
Sunrise-Addict
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 2:24 PM
Joined: 3/26/2018
Posts: 49


Jim Broede wrote:
I have many dementia-riddled friends. I never go more than a few days without seeing them. One. I took for walks. Almost daily. For years. Until he died. By the way, he appreciated my humor. I inherited his $6,000 hearing aids. I'm wearing then now. Listening to the singing birds. By the way. That was the only payment I received. As his care-giver. My practice is to work for free. An unpaid volunteer.  My rewards come in other meaningful ways. I'm really a nice fellow, if I may say so. Come visit me some day. You'll become a believer. --Jim

So, let me get this straight. You got 6K hearing aids from the person you call "dementia-riddled," (an insult in my book, though you apparently think it's funny). You boast about it on a public forum. That's nice you received payment when your so-called "practice" is to work for free. And you offer a visit. This is just lovely. What do you think this is, a place to cultivate "friends" you are then going to extort? That's just how it looks to me. Oh, but I am riddled with dementia (your term). I am so right to be suspicious of people like you. But thank you for making it clear why. Your instructions are priceless.
Sunrise-Addict
Posted: Saturday, April 28, 2018 2:25 PM
Joined: 3/26/2018
Posts: 49


Jim Broede wrote:
TiggerPooh wrote:
Jim Broede wrote:

 

Sometimes I write and do stuff meant to be funny. But it’s taken seriously. That’s the funny part. It’s called a put-on. With tongue-in-cheek. I say it with straight-face. Friends generally know I’m kidding. But I pull the stunt. With strangers, too. That’s more a gamble. They eventually catch on. And know what to expect next time. I like to keep people guessing. Though I prefer to keep them laughing. My message. Life wasn’t always meant to be taken seriously. One can find humor. In almost anything. --Jim

 


Jim -- I thought your psychologist friend told you not to do that on a website devoted to people with alzheimer's and related dementias, and those in the middle of caring for those people. What happened? Just having another bad day?

 

 
 

 

Haven’t you noticed? I don’t always follow the advice of other people.  I’m inclined to challenge so-called expert advice. I experiment. And often enough discover that their advice was wrong. Humor. Humor works.  Often. With people with dementia. Helps them relax. Especially in the early and mid-stages. Please, don’t underestimate the dementia mind. It can be stimulated. In all sorts of ways. Sometimes, even in advanced stages. Sometimes, all it takes is a breath of fresh air. And physical movement.  And an outing with a comedian. I work with the dementia-riddled. Almost every day. And I get positive results. --Jim

 

 


I have never underestimated the dementia mind since I am living it. I dislike you putting down people with dementia. I consider your use of the term "dementia-riddled" to be a put-down, not funny.


llee08032
Posted: Tuesday, May 8, 2018 7:46 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Dementia words matter: http://dementiavoices.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/DEEP-Guide-Language.pdf


The guide contains recommendations from 20 persons with dementia.

Personally, I think in depicting terms about persons with dementia or any other illness it is important that we put the person first before the diagnosis or illness. We on this board must all work together in preserving the dignity and integrity of persons with dementia and language identifying such persons should always be respectful. Please be more considerate and respectful of our feelings and the feelings of our loved ones.