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Pat Summitt stepped down in April
Iris L.
Posted: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 1:38 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17899


"Eight months after disclosing her diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, Pat Summitt announced Wednesday that she will step aside as the Tennessee women’s basketball coach, making way for longtime assistant Holly Warlick to take over the Lady Vols. 

 

The university made the news official via a press release Wednesday afternoon after Summitt, 59, met with her players in Knoxville, Tenn., to inform them in private. A news conference is expected to follow Thursday. 

 

Summitt, who has won more college basketball games than any man or woman in the sport (1,09, is not retiring but will remain part of Tennessee’s staff, assuming the title “head coach emeritus,” which will give her latitude and flexibility to do as much mentoring with players as her health allows. 

 

 But her role will be circumscribed by NCAA rules, which will permit her to watch practice, collaborate on game plans and continue as a motivator, disciplinarian and mentor but will preclude her from actively coaching. Rather than sit on the bench during games, she’ll sit directly behind the Lady Vols’ staff, able to consult with Warlick and, no doubt, telegraph her impressions of what’s unfolding on the court through her famously piercing glare..."

 

 

 

For more of the story and links, read here: 

  

 http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/pat-summitt-to-step-down-legendary-tennessee-womens-basketball-coach-won-1098-games-8-ncaa-titles/2012/04/18/gIQA2CK2QT_story.html 

 

 

 

Iris L.  

 

 

 

 


Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 7:43 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Iris, Pat Summit and her son both received an award at the DC forum. I was very disappointed that they did not mingle, especially with us with the disease. 
There was also a former Senator from Kansas and his wife there. Same situation. I think his diagnosis may be a big boost to get Congress to understand the situation.
Both are in Early Stage and their appearance and demeanor are great. 
I strongly feel that these people diagnosed who are in the public eye, need to be a part of our Early Stage community. They must have the same feelings, worries and triumphs that we do. I hope someday they will join us on these boards and in our national and local groups. On these boards they can protect their privacy. In our 'in person' group the confidentiality policy of most support groups would have to be strictly held.
Feed back?

Iris L.
Posted: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 9:16 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17899


Personally, Mimi, I believe people who are in public life have a lot of confidence in other public figures, meaning the official medical community.   

 

You and I both know that most of the information about dementia and living with dementia is found on the pages of these message boards.  How would they be referred to this support? 

 

Iris L. 


Lisa428
Posted: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 10:07 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


People are given awards but not information?

That doesn't seem likely?

Yet, some people in the Public Eye don't mingle with the little people.

I just hope they received ALL the information they need.

Peace and Hope,

Lisa


dayn2nite
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2012 10:16 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 3097


Mimi S. wrote:
Iris, Pat Summit and her son both received an award at the DC forum. I was very disappointed that they did not mingle, especially with us with the disease. 
 
There was also a former Senator from Kansas and his wife there. Same situation. I think his diagnosis may be a big boost to get Congress to understand the situation.
 
Both are in Early Stage and their appearance and demeanor are great. 
 
I strongly feel that these people diagnosed who are in the public eye, need to be a part of our Early Stage community. They must have the same feelings, worries and triumphs that we do. I hope someday they will join us on these boards and in our national and local groups. On these boards they can protect their privacy. In our 'in person' group the confidentiality policy of most support groups would have to be strictly held.
 
Feed back?

 

Mimi, from her demeanor in recent appearances I've seen, I suspect she is much, much farther in the disease than "early" dementia.  The symptoms she described when she announced the disease were Stage 4 at a minimum.  She looks like she's advanced even more since the beginning of the season.

 

I suspect she or possibly her son are trying to preserve her image of a very powerful person by not mingling with attendees.  Since she is a public figure, any misstep she makes will be reported all over the mass media.  It also could be that large crowds agitate her and confuse her, and maybe that is why she wasn't speaking with attendees. 


RussB
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2012 5:22 PM
Joined: 1/23/2012
Posts: 25


I was able to say hello to Pat at the DC forum. I told her she was a brave woman and to deal with this on a day by day basis. I think she is making good decisions and has some idea of what lies ahead.
Mimi S.
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2012 7:33 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Russ what was your assessment "up close and personal?" I was in the very last row in the room (cold...took a wrap from the bed to wear at a dress up affair, rather than my usual jacket.  Center of room was comfortable.)

 

From my vantage point I saw nothing that said she was not still in Early Stage. She could very well be there and hope to prolong that stay. Being coach of a high performing college sport is high pressure 12 months a year. Difficult to do even in the early stage of this disease.

 

I can't image that the Aliz. Assoc. would deliberately withhold information from anyone. They might be lurking or even on the boards right now and we wouldn't know it. And that would be great. 


dayn2nite
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2012 10:34 PM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 3097


Mimi S. wrote:

 

I can't image that the Aliz. Assoc. would deliberately withhold information from anyone. They might be lurking or even on the boards right now and we wouldn't know it. And that would be great. 


I don't think the Alz Association is withholding anything.  Her diagnosis and treatment are between her and her doctor--there is no earthly reason why she would be notifying the AA of what stage she's in.  It's certainly not a requirement to receive an award.

 

I also don't believe she has any obligation to make public appearances for the association.  She spent her life running a fundraising machine that was attached to her team that also kept her away from her family.  Why would she waste more time being paraded in front of people so the AA can get some more donations?  And bottom line that's what they want--donations. 

 

If you believe she is in early stage, then that's fine.


Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2012 11:46 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17899


Iris L. wrote: 
 

 

You and I both know that most of the information about dementia and living with dementia is found on the pages of these message boards.  How would they be referred to this support? 

 

 

 

I have to add to what I wrote earlier after I thought about it a bit more.  High profile people like Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher and Pat Summitt probably get much personalized attention and support at home.  The people around them may not see the need for the support of a group like ours.   

 

I have noticed that often new caregiver members join with an early stage person at home, but their early stage LOs do not join our group. 

 

Caregivers are encouraged to seek "socialization" for their mid stage LOs in adult day care centers and facilities.  But early stage people are most often left to their own devices.   

 

There seems to be little effort in the outside world to encourage appropriate socialization and support for early stage people.  Socialization with peers is just not thought about. 

  

On the other hand, high profile people who are diagnosed with cancer are encouraged to join cancer support groups. 

 

Leeza Gibbons founded her own foundation for Alzheimer's support when her Mom was diagnosed.   

 

My wish is that Pat Summitt would eventually discover these message boards, even under a pseudonym.  Or her caregiver son could join our group.   

 

We'll see what the Pat Summit Foundation accomplishes.  I wish only the best support and care for Pat Summit.   

 

But I ask this:  How will she learn about Best Practices, Axona, and now aromatherapy?  This is all part of the treatment plan that the medical people may not be aware of. 

 

 

Iris L. 

 

 


dayn2nite
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2012 11:57 PM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 3097


I know that I encouraged my mother to join this board when she was in very early stages and she flatly refused--she didn't believe that she had dementia.

 

So you have that aspect of it also, people in denial.


Iris L.
Posted: Friday, May 4, 2012 12:50 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17899


dayn2nite wrote:

she flatly refused--she didn't believe that she had dementia.

 


I have thought often about this and we discussed it on the old board.  I believe when a patient develops anosognosia, they have passed the early stages.   

 

On the other hand, JAB thought many early stage people develop anosognosia early in their disease.  She stated that is why many  early stage people do not join with us.   

 

This would be a good research project for someone. 

 

I plan to post about it again after I do some research. 

 

Iris L. 

 

 


Mimi S.
Posted: Friday, May 4, 2012 7:12 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Good question Iris.

I suspect there is denial with some people early on.

And then that other word, 

anosognosia

which I have trouble remembering is something completely different.


dayn2nite
Posted: Friday, May 4, 2012 7:40 PM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 3097


My mom didn't have anosognosia, she was well aware she had memory problems.  She was unwilling to put the word "dementia" to it or participate in a support group or message board for dementia.
Myriam
Posted: Friday, May 4, 2012 8:49 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


dayn2nite wrote:
My mom didn't have anosognosia, she was well aware she had memory problems.  She was unwilling to put the word "dementia" to it or participate in a support group or message board for dementia.
There has always been a stigma around Alzheimer's/dementia, like the stigma there used to exist with cancer. I remember when the word cancer was never uttered, but now there are ribbons, ads, parades, bracelets, marathons, etc. to fight cancer. Many of us, people with dementia and caregivers, are out there trying to get as much attention on Alzheimer's as possible to get more funding for research to find a cure. My motto is better to fight than to disappear.