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supplements tested by independent lab
Vita99
Posted: Sunday, February 2, 2014 5:30 AM
Joined: 9/4/2012
Posts: 469


 https://labdoor.com/about  

 

So far they have test results for fish oil, protein powders and energy drinks.  I found the results on fish oil helpful.  They indicate Nature Made as a good value, but I have read negative things about it in a blog a few years ago.   The blood tests of several people on Nature Made did not show the expected improvement after taking the Nature Made fish oil.   


Mimi S.
Posted: Sunday, February 2, 2014 8:42 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Are supplements manufactured by Market America in the test results?
Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, February 2, 2014 11:42 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18520


This seems like it could be an interesting site but technically, I can barely read it because the font is so faint.

Iris L.

Biff Calhoun
Posted: Sunday, February 2, 2014 12:03 PM
Joined: 8/20/2013
Posts: 56


Here is another lab I found during my searches.... it is a paid site, but they seem to have a lot of information.

 

Maybe this is helpful?

 

https://www.consumerlab.com/


Biff Calhoun
Posted: Sunday, February 2, 2014 12:35 PM
Joined: 8/20/2013
Posts: 56


Vita99 - in my wanderings around what I have seen is that there have been tests on DHA 9 (Docosahexaenoic Acid) one of the Omega-3s as efficacy for AD. 

 

While a large randomized study concluded that, "Supplementation with DHA compared with placebo did not slow the rate of cognitive and functional decline,"  if one read the conclusions they were able to see a key nuance:

 

APOE ε4–negative participants who received DHA supplementation showed a benefit on the ADAS-cog and MMSE. (1)

 

So the question in my mind is do I want to concentrate on just pure DHA or take a fish oil with DHA and greater amounts of EHA and other Omega-3s?  Omega-3s derived from algae tend to be nearly 100% DHA, which suits vegans.

 

 

 

 

 

1.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3259852/

 

 


Vita99
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2014 5:56 AM
Joined: 9/4/2012
Posts: 469


Mimi, there is a limited number of products reviewed on the site at this time but it is free.  From what I understand it is just getting  off the ground.  I usually buy  the fish oil that is available at the grocery store and  several of those made the list.  Consumerlabs.com charges a yearly fee before allowing access but they have quite a bit more reviews.  


Keep us posted Lane.  I have been taking fish oil for years but have not researched it very much.  


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2014 10:49 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


DHA likely reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease by altering lipid rafts to inhibit the formation of peroxynitrites (nitrotyrosine is a marker of peroxynitrite-mediated damage). 


 

Docosahexaenoic acid attenuates the early inflammatory response following spinal cord injury in mice: in-vivo and in-vitro studies

Irene Paterniti, Daniela Impellizzeri, [...], and Salvatore Cuzzocrea


 

Treatment with DHA significantly reduced: nitrotyrosine formation.

 

 2010;19(2):489-502. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2010-1242.

Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

Abstract

Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD. 

 

TNFα potentiates protein-tyrosine nitration through activation of eNOS and NADPH oxidase localized in caveolae of bovine aortic endothelial cells   

Baohua Yang, Victor Rizzo. Cardiovascular Research Center, Temple University School of Medicine, 3420 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA,  

19140  

 

A major source of ROS in endothelial cells is the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex. The selective distributions of any enzyme within the cell have   important implications in regulating enzyme effectiveness through facilitating access to local substrates and/or product targets. Since lipid rafts and caveolae provide a spatially preferable environment for a variety of enzyme systems, we sought to determine if NADPH oxidase is present and  functional in this plasma membrane compartment in endothelial cells. We found that NADPH oxidase subunits were preassembled and the enzyme functional in membrane rafts/caveolae. In addition, TNFα induced: a) recruitment of p47phox regulatory subunit, b) interaction with the p22phox subunit and c) enhanced ROS production within rafts/caveolae domains. TNFα also induced phosphorylation and activation of eNOS present in plasma membrane raft/caveolae compartments. The dual activation of superoxide and nitric oxide generating systems within the same membrane compartment provided a spatially favorable environment for formation of peroxynitrite as evidence by detection of nitration of tyrosine containing proteins localized to rafts/caveolae. Perturbation of lipid raft/caveolae structural integrity with cholesterol sequestering compounds caused the relocalization of eNOS and NADPH oxidase subunits from the lipid rafts and inhibited TNF.α-induced peroxynitrite formation. Together, these data provide the first evidence that lipid rafts/caveolae play a role in regulating NADPH oxidase and subsequent ROS generation in endothelial cells.  


 

By altering lipid rafts, DHA likely reduces the risks of Alzheimer's disease by limiting the production of peroxynitrites.  Similarly, phenolic compounds by lowering levels of the enzyme (phospholipase C) that acts on these rafts also reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease.  Hence, the value of the Mediterranean diet high in fish (DHA) and various fruits, vegetables, and spices (phenols) in reducing the risk for Alzheimer's disease. 

 

 

 2005 Dec;26 Suppl 1:133-6. Epub 2005 Nov 2.

Prevention of Alzheimer's disease: Omega-3 fatty acid and phenolic anti-oxidant interventions.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are syndromes of aging that share analogous lesions and risk factors, involving lipoproteins, oxidative damage and inflammation. Unlike in CVD, in AD, sensitive biomarkers are unknown, and high-risk groups are understudied. To identify potential prevention strategies in AD, we have focused on pre-clinical models (transgenic and amyloid infusion models), testing dietary/lifestyle factors strongly implicated in reducing risk in epidemiological studies. Initially, we reported the impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), notably ibuprofen, which reduced amyloid accumulation, but suppressed few inflammatory markers and without reducing oxidative damage. Safety concerns with chronic NSAIDs led to a screen of alternative NSAIDs and identification of the phenolic anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant compound curcumin, the yellow pigment in turmeric that we found targeted multiple AD pathogenic cascades. The dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), also limited amyloid, oxidative damage and synaptic and cognitive deficits in a transgenic mouse model. Both DHA and curcumin have favorable safety profiles, epidemiology and efficacy, and may exert general anti-aging benefits (anti-cancer and cardioprotective.).

 

DHA can act as an antioxidant but it can also be oxidized and this may partially explain the different results in trials for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. 


 

ABSTRACT

Dietary enrichment with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has numerous beneficial effects on health. However, the intake of high doses of polyunsaturated fatty acids can promote lipid peroxidation and the subsequent propagation of oxygen radicals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of DHA on lipid peroxidation and tight junction structure and permeability in Caco-2 cell cultures. Moreover, the effects of taurine, a functional ingredient with antioxidant properties, were also tested. Differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers were maintained in DHA-supplemented conditions with or without added taurine. Incubation with 100 μM DHA increased lipid peroxidation and paracellular permeability, in parallel with a redistribution of the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. Taurine partially prevented all of these effects. The participation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in increased paracellular permeability was also examined using various agents that modify the formation of superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite may be involved in the DHA-induced increase in paracellular permeability and that the protective role of taurine may be in part related to its capacity to counteract the effects of hydrogen peroxide. 

 

So DHA should help to reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease, but may not be helpful in treatment at least not for those with the APOE4 gene. 

 

Vita, I hope that your mother's caregiver is doing all right. 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2014 1:45 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


More on lipid rafts (which are partially composed of low density lipids and saturated fats) and Alzheimer's disease.


Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains, enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, into which specific subsets of proteins and lipids partition, creating cell-signalling platforms that are vital for neuronal functions. Lipid rafts play at least three crucial roles in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), namely, in promoting the generation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, facilitating its aggregation upon neuronal membranes to form toxic oligomers and hosting specific neuronal receptors through which the AD-related neurotoxicity and memory impairments of the Aβ oligomers are transduced. Recent evidence suggests that Aβ oligomers may exert their deleterious effects through binding to, and causing the aberrant clustering of, lipid raft proteins including the cellular prion protein and glutamate receptors. The formation of these pathogenic lipid raft-based platforms may be critical for the toxic signalling mechanisms that underlie synaptic dysfunction and neuropathology in AD.


http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijad/2011/603052/


I would substitute the word peroxynitrites for amyloid oligomers.  Otherwise, I think the authors are correct.


DHA disrupts this process so it helps to protect against Alzheimer's disease and may have some useful for Alzheimer's patients in the early stages of the disease.  The reason why it likely does not help Alzheimer's patients with the APOE4 gene is that the APOE4 gene increases levels of saturated fats counteracting the positive effects of Omega 3-fatty acids (such as DHA).