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Meghan Markle, suicidal ideation and stigma
Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, March 13, 2021 1:34 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17945


Her interview struck a nerve with me because I can identify with her.  When she broke down and admitted she needed help, she went to HR but was told she couldn't be helped because she wasn't a paid employee. I had a similar experience.  Years ago, when I was told I had dementia, I called a suicide hotline, because I was having those types of thoughts.  I was told by the person who answered the telephone that he had to keep the line open for serious cases.  He referred me to a "warm" line.  I told that person that I had been referred by the suicide hotline, but was placed on hold.  I waited for twenty minutes, then hung up.  I did get help from an online suicide prevention website, which had advice for people in crisis.  People have the idea that people of privilege do not deserve to express emotional pain or to receive help.  This is one reason why people keep their painful issues to themselves.


In Meghan Markle's interview, she did not mention receiving medical help for depression.  She is at risk for post-partum depression.  She could still be at risk for self-harm.  She could be at risk for poor attachment to her new baby.  I experienced this when I became a new step-mother.  I was in a state of depression at that time, and I realize now, decades later, that there were gaps in our relationship.  Things would have been markedly different if I had understood that I had a type of new mother depression, although I had not given birth.  


All during the early years of my diagnosis of depression, people would tell me I had too much good in my life to be depressed.  This made me feel even worse.  Fortunately, I have learned to overcome that negativity.  I hope Meghan Markle can find substantial help for her depression.  Acknowledgement of emotional distress and treatment for it should not be denied due to social status, whether high or low or middle.  


Iris


KawKaw
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 11:18 AM
Joined: 11/22/2019
Posts: 396


I agree with you.

I think that mental health services are dismal for many, in addition to the stigma for asking for mental health assistance.

For those who have insurance, there is still not parity for mental health services.  These are often provided separately by contracted companies.  Too often, the available providers are inadequate in availability and experience.
For those without insurance, the choices are even more limited.  To get services, often, one must register for services that will not be provided for weeks or months--nearly useless when there is a MH crisis.

And those services are severely limited to few appointments.  Often, counseling is perceived as something temporary and situationally specific.

I have been navigating mental health services for my entire adult life because I have a chronic mental health disability.

It saddens me that so many people do not get the mental health support they need to thrive.


Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, March 30, 2021 9:13 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17945


When I was told by the geriatrician that I had dementia, I contracted with an organization that provided in-home psychotherapy for seniors over 60.  I told the therapist I was in a depression because I feared having Alzheimer's Disease.  I was told I was too "with-it" to have AD, and why was I thinking like that?  This went on for months.  I got more "therapy" from  interacting with the members of these boards and the Care Consultants.  In those days the Care Consultants had their own section and responded to personal questions.

 

Facing a progressive and terminal illness is a valid reason for needing psychological support.  I was devastated at being misunderstood and disregarded.  I have resisted suggesting that other PWDs seek therapy or counseling ever since.  I have come to believe that peer support and speaking with a Care Counselor is therapeutic for people like us.  But I still feel bad that we can't get help from professionals who are supposed to be educated to help us.  We are isolated by our illness and again isolated and abandoned by professionals.

 

Iris

 


KawKaw
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 9:42 AM
Joined: 11/22/2019
Posts: 396


Your story demonstrates the lack of understanding we all need to receive from medical professionals, both for physical and mental health challenges.

I agree with you absolutely.

I have had two psychiatrists and two therapists over the past 23 years who were truly skilled and able to assist me well, including me as a partner in treatment.

Many who were not, too.

"Too with it?"  Oh please...