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High Vitamin D Linked to Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease
Myriam
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2012 4:50 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


From Alzheimer's Daily News:


(Source: Foodconsumer.org) - A new study suggests that taking vitamin D supplements may help prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease.


Researchers at the Cédric Annweiler of Université Nantes-Angers-Le Mans, France, showed that older women who had highest quintile of vitamin D dietary intake were 77 percent less likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease during a 7-year period, compared to those who had the lowest quintile of vitamin D.

 

Go to full story: http://www.foodconsumer.org


onward
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 12:23 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


Thanks very much for posting this, Myriam. 

 

So far, I haven't found an easy way to access the full paper online, but here's a bit more info that I came across about the study: 

 

 

 

Higher Vitamin D Dietary Intake Is Associated With Lower Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease: A 7-Year Follow-up

Abstract

 Background. Hypovitaminosis D is associated with cognitive decline among older adults. The relationship between vitamin D intakes and cognitive decline is not well understood. Our objective was to determine whether the dietary intake of vitamin D was an independent predictor of the onset of dementia within 7 years among women aged 75 years and older.

 

Methods. Four hundred and ninety-eight community-dwelling women (mean, 79.8 ± 3.8 years) free of vitamin D supplements from the EPIDemiology of OSteoporosis Toulouse cohort study were divided into three groups according to the onset of dementia within 7 years (ie, no dementia, Alzheimer’s disease [AD], or other dementias). Baseline vitamin D dietary intakes were estimated from self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Age, body mass index, initial cognitive performance, education level, physical activity, sun exposure, disability, number of chronic diseases, hypertension, depression, use of psychoactive drugs, and baseline season were considered as potential confounders.

 

Results. Women who developed AD (n = 70) had lower baseline vitamin D intakes (mean, 50.3 ± 19.3 μg/wk) than nondemented (n = 361; mean intake = 59.0 ± 29.9 μg/wk, p = .027) or those who developed other dementias (n = 67; mean intake = 63.6 ± 38.1 μg/wk, p = .010). There was no difference between other dementias and no dementia (p = .247). Baseline vitamin D dietary intakes were associated with the onset of AD (adjusted odds ratio = 0.99 [95% confidence interval = 0.98–0.99], p = .041) but not with other dementias (p = .071). Being in the highest quintile of vitamin D dietary intakes was associated with a lower risk of AD compared with the lower 4 quintiles combined (adjusted odds ratio = 0.23 [95% confidence interval = 0.08–0.67], p = .007).

 

Conclusions. Higher vitamin D dietary intake was associated with a lower risk of developing AD among older women.  



http://biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/04/13/gerona.gls107.short 

 

  


Myriam
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2012 1:54 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Thanks, Onward!
onward
Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2012 10:02 AM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217



http://blog.vitamindcouncil.org/2012/10/04/meta-analysis-and-review-low-d-increases-risk-of-alzheimers/ 

 

Meta-analysis and review: Low D increases risk of Alzheimer’s

 


Tom(ek)
Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2012 4:14 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 62


Short digression:

 

 Interesting is fact that vitamin D regulates the concentration of calcium and phosphate in the bloodstream. In case of calcium deficiency (for example hypocalcemia caused by vitamin D deficiency) parathyroid hormone takes calcium from bones (huge problem of children and old people). Because of it blood test to check calcium level in many cases doesn't have much sense. It won't give information about whole calcium metabolism.

Doctors often check calcium but in fact they should check calcium, phosphate, vitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone (PTH).

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2012 9:12 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4854


Some additional reasons why Vitamin D may lower the risk for Alzheimer's disease. 

 

Accumulating data have provided evidence that vitamin D is involved in brain function. Vitamin D can inhibit the synthesis of inducible nitric oxide synthase and increase glutathione levels, suggesting a role for the hormone in brain detoxification. 

 

http://www.healthysavannah.com/VitD.html 

 

I have been spending part of my day elsewhere on the internet, and just these posts here reminded me of how good the researchers on this site are. 

 

 


onward
Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 2:01 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


 

Vitamin D linked to women's cognitive health

 

04 December 2012 

 

 

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitamin-d-linked-to-womens-cognitive-health/  

 

 

Two recent studies appearing in the Journals of Gerontology: Series A suggests that vitamin D plays a vital role in the cognitive health of aging women. 

  

 

Cedric Annweiler, MD, PhD, and colleagues found that increased vitamin D intake is associated with a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. 

  

 

Annweiler’s team divided 498 older women from a community into three groups – no dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, or other dementias – and studied the onset of dementia in a 7 year time period.  

 

 

 Women who eventually developed  Alzheimer’s disease had significantly lower baseline vitamin D status than those who didn’t develop Alzheimers or those who developed other dementias. 

  

 

Similarly, researchers led by Yelena Slinin, MD, MS, at the VA Medical Center in Minneapolis found that vitamin D deficiency among older women is associated with higher risk of cognitive impairment and decline. 

   

 Assessing 6,257 community-dwelling elderly women, Slinin and colleagues found that women with vitamin D levels <10 ng/ml had an increased risk of cognitive impairment and decline at baseline compared with women with vitamin D levels 30 ng/ml. 

 

 

 

Source:  

 

News. Vitamin D tied to womens cognitive performance. The Gerontological Society of America. Nov 30, 2012.