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"Higher self-reported dietary intakes of potassium, calcium, and magnesium reduce the risk of all-cause dementia, especially VaD..."
onward
Posted: Sunday, December 2, 2012 6:27 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


  2012 Aug
doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.04061.x. Epub 2012 Aug 2.

Self-reported dietary intake of potassium, calcium, and magnesium and risk of dementia in the Japanese: the Hisayama Study.

Source

Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether higher intake of potassium, calcium, and magnesium reduces the risk of incident dementia.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

The Hisayama Study, in Japan.

PARTICIPANTS:

One thousand eighty-one community-dwelling Japanese individuals without dementia aged 60 and older.

MEASUREMENTS:

A 70-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to assess potassium, calcium, and magnesium intakes. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the development of all-cause dementia and its subtypes were estimated using Cox proportional hazards model.

RESULTS:

During a 17-year follow-up, 303 participants experienced all-cause dementia; of these, 98 had vascular dementia (VaD), and 166 had Alzheimer's disease (AD). The multivariable-adjusted HRs for the development of all-cause dementia were 0.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.30-0.91), 0.64 (95% CI = 0.41-1.00), and 0.63 (95% CI = 0.40-1.01) for the highest quartiles of potassium, calcium, and magnesium intake, respectively, compared with the corresponding lowest quartiles. Similarly, the HRs for the development of VaD were 0.20 (95% CI = 0.07-0.56), 0.24 (95% CI = 0.11-0.53), and 0.26 (95% CI = 0.11-0.61) for the highest quartiles of potassium, calcium, and magnesium intake, respectively. There was no evidence of a linear association between these mineral intakes and the risk of AD.

CONCLUSION:

Higher self-reported dietary intakes of potassium, calcium, and magnesium reduce the risk of all-cause dementia, especially VaD, in the general Japanese population.
 

© 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22860881 

________________________________________________

Also see:
http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Minerals/minerals_prevent_dementia_1201121232.html 

 


Myriam
Posted: Sunday, December 2, 2012 7:29 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


My mother gave me vitamins and calcium since I was a young child. I continued to take supplements throughout my life. My family carries the presenilin 1 gene, which appeared in my father, aunts and uncles, and older cousins when they were in their mid 40's. When I turned 60, I thought I was safe, but I noticed my first symptom at 62. I believe it's possible the vitamins, calcium and other supplements I ingested throughout my life may have forestalled the inevitable.