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SunshineFour
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 8:45 AM
Joined: 12/29/2011
Posts: 17


Hi has anyone tried or heard of this supplement NADH? thanks

 

http://www.nadh.com/alzhmrs/Alzhm105.htm


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 10:54 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


Here are the results from one of the earlier clinical trials using NADP to treat Alzheimer's disease. 


 

 2004;30(1):27-33.

Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with stabilized oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: a randomized, double-blind study.

Source

Department of Neurology, Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia. vida.demarin@zg.tel.hr

Abstract

This study was designed to evaluate the effect of stabilized oral reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) on cognitive functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). NADH is a coenzyme that plays a key role in cellular energy production and stimulates dopamine production. In previous trials NADH has been shown to improve cognitive functioning in patients with Parkinson's disease, depression and AD. The present trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled, matched-pairs, double-blind, 6-month clinical study. Patients with probable AD (n = 26) were randomized to receive either stabilized oral NADH (10 mg/day) or placebo. Twelve pairs of subjects were matched for age and baseline total score on the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS) and the Mini Mental State Examination. After 6 months of treatment, subjects treated with NADH showed no evidence of progressive cognitive deterioration and had significantly higher total scores on the MDRS compared with subjects treated with placebo (p < 0.05). Analysis of MDRS subscales revealed significantly better performance by NADH subjects on measures of verbal fluency (p = 0.019), visual-constructional ability (p = 0.038 ) and a trend (p = 0.08 ) to better performance on a measure of abstract verbal reasoning. There were no differences between groups in measures of attention, memory, or in clinician ratings of dementia severity (Clinical Dementia Rating). Consistent with earlier studies, the present findings support NADH as a treatment for AD.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15134388 

 

NADH is another peroxynitrite scavenger that can likely be used to treat Alzheimer's disease. 


 

 1999 Aug 27;274(35):24664-70.

Reaction of peroxynitrite with reduced nicotinamide nucleotides, the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

Source

Institut für Physiologische Chemie, Universitätsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, D-45122 Essen, Germany.


 

NADH reacted 5-100 times faster with peroxynitrite than do the known peroxynitrite scavengers glutathione, cysteine, and tryptophan. 


 

Thanks, SunshineFour, for providing another possible option for treating Alzheimer's disease. 


 


 


onward
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 11:10 AM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


 

[Edited to add:  Oops, I didn't see Lane's post till after I posted this.] 

  

____________________ 

  

SunshineFour, thanks for posting about the supplement NADH. 

  

For anyone interested, here are excerpts from the article whose link you posted: 

  

_____________________

 

A New Therapeutic Approach for Improving Dementia of the ALZHEIMER TYPE 

 

by Jorg G. D. Birkmayer, M.D., Ph.D
Forschungs-und Lehreinrichtung des Birkmayer Instituts fur Parkinsontherapie, Vienna, Austria

 


 

ABSTRACT:
The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has been used as mediation in patients suffering from dementia of the Alzheimer type in an open label trial.
 

 

In all patients evaluated so far, an improvement in their cognitive dysfunction was observed.  

 

Based on the minimental state examination, the minimum improvement was 6 points and the maximum improvement 14 points with a mean value of 8.35 points. The improvement on the basis of the global deterioration scale (GDS) was a minimum of 1 point and a maximum of 2 points with a mean value of 1.82. The duration of therapy was between 8 and 12 weeks. No side effects or adverse effects have been reported from the patients or their caregivers during the observation period which is, in some patients, more than a year. This open label trial represents a pilot study from which no definitive conclusion can be drawn. A double-blind placebo controlled study is necessary to demonstrate the clinical efficacy of NADH. The planning and the fulfillment of all requirements for such a study are in progress... 

 

_____________________ 

 

His charts here show big jumps in MMSE scores:

http://www.nadh.com/alzhmrs/Alzhm230.htm#Top
 

 

  

_____________________ 

 

 

That sounds wonderful! 

 

I also came across this other study (below) which, though very small, was double-blind and placebo controlled. 

 

Unfortunately, it showed no improvement in memory, but did show other improvements: 

 

__________________________

 

Drugs Exp Clin Res. 2004;30(1):27-33.

 

Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with stabilized oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: a randomized, double-blind study.

 

 

Source

Department of Neurology, Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia. vida.demarin@zg.tel.hr

 

Abstract

This study was designed to evaluate the effect of stabilized oral reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) on cognitive functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). NADH is a coenzyme that plays a key role in cellular energy production and stimulates dopamine production. In previous trials NADH has been shown to improve cognitive functioning in patients with Parkinson's disease, depression and AD. The present trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled, matched-pairs, double-blind, 6-month clinical study. Patients with probable AD (n = 26) were randomized to receive either stabilized oral NADH (10 mg/day) or placebo. Twelve pairs of subjects were matched for age and baseline total score on the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS) and the Mini Mental State Examination.

 

After 6 months of treatment, subjects treated with NADH showed no evidence of progressive cognitive deterioration and had significantly higher total scores on the MDRS compared with subjects treated with placebo (p < 0.05). Analysis of MDRS subscales revealed significantly better performance by NADH subjects on measures of verbal fluency (p = 0.019), visual-constructional ability... and a trend... to better performance on a measure of abstract verbal reasoning.  

 

There were no differences between groups in measures of attention, memory, or in clinician ratings of dementia severity (Clinical Dementia Rating). Consistent with earlier studies, the present findings support NADH as a treatment for AD. 

 
PMID: 15134388 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 
_____________________
 
 
And here's another study:
 
J Neural Transm. 2000;107(12):1475-81.
 

No evidence for cognitive improvement from oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in dementia.

 
 
 

Source

Memory-Clinic and Psychiatric Department, Donauspital, Sozialmedizinisches Zentrum Ost, Wein, Austria.

 
 

Abstract

Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is advertised as an over-the-counter product or dietary supplement to treat Alzheimer's disease. We performed a 3-month open-label study with oral 10 mg/day NADH with 25 patients with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer, vascular, and fronto-temporal types in addition to their current cholinomimetic drug medication. In 19 patients who completed the study, we found no evidence for any cognitive effect as defined by established psychometric tests. We conclude that NADH is unlikely to achieve cognitive improvements in an extent reported earlier, and present theoretical arguments against an effectiveness of this compound in dementia disorders.

 
 
 
PMID: 11459000 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

__________________________


So I'm not sure what's going on here.  Maybe Birkmayer (whose website you linked to) is using a slightly different form of NADH or is administering it differently, maybe a different dose schedule?  With or without food?  Maybe his group of patients is somehow different than those chosen for the other studies?  Why are his results so much better than the results of the two other, later studies?  

 

But all these studies are very small and preliminary.  

 

I see that Birkmayer's website sells a particular type of NADH, and this same type also seems to be available at Amazon, if I'm not mistaken. 

 
I did find one anecdotal account posted at WebMD by someone who claimed huge improvement in memory problems after taking NADH. 

 

I'd love to think that NADH might help at least some people. 

 

Thanks again for posting. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 1:44 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


 

One potential problem with NADP is it can increase superoxide production which increases hydrogen peroxide levels early in Alzheimer's disease and peroxynitrite levels later in Alzheimer's disease.  So perhaps, there may be some balance between its contributions to peroxynitrite formation and peroxynitrite scavenging that may tip in different directions depending upon the individual.  And/or as Onward suggested the results may depend on how it is taken. 


onward
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 2:55 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


 

Lane, you've got me a bit confused here.  What is NADP?  Do you mean NADH?

 

Here, by the way, are some of the NADH papers:

 

____________

 

 

1996 

 

Birkmayer 

 

Coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: new therapeutic approach for improving dementia of the Alzheimer type 

 

Abstract only:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8834355
 

 



____________

 

2000 

 

Rainer et al

 

No evidence for cognitive improvement from oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in dementia 

 

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CDMQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.researchgate.net%2Fpublication%2F11882994_No_evidence_for_cognitive_improvement_from_oral_nicotinamide_adenine_dinucleotide_(NADH)_in_dementia%2Ffile%2Fd912f510a6a1474e67.pdf&ei=krluUvymE_bi4AP0nYC4Dg&usg=AFQjCNFjgXqV6I5rWoL-jRtzYcTiQdn9Dw&bvm=bv.55123115,d.dmg 


____________

 

 

2002 

 

Demarin et al

 

ENADA/NADH improves cognitive impairment of Alzheimer patients 

 

http://birkmayer-nadh.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/nadh_improves_cognitive_impairment_of_Alzheimer_patients.pdf 

 

 

_____________

 

 

2004 

 

Demarin et al

 

Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with stabilized oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: a randomized, double-blind study

http://birkmayer-nadh.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/treatment_of_alzheimers_disease_demarin.pdf 

 

 

____________

 

 

2006 

 

Kelley

 

Current state of science review focusing on characterization, efficacy, safety, use and promising areas for oral NADH 

 

[This paper summarizes previous studies.  She indicates that although the early study by Birkmayer showed big improvements in MMSE scores, subsequent studies (up to when she wrote in 2006)  had so far failed to substantiate that.] 

 

 http://novion.com.ua/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/NADH_monograph6136_sales.pdf 



 

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 4:00 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


Sorry, Onward, typed it wrong: NADH not NADP.  I look forward to taking a closer look at the last study tonight.
Myriam
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 5:25 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


NADH stands for "nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) + hydrogen (H)." This chemical occurs naturally in the body and plays a role in the chemical process that generates energy. People use NADH supplements as medicine.

NADH is used for improving mental clarity, alertness, concentration, and memory; as well as for treating Alzheimer’s disease. Because of its role in energy production, NADH is also used for improving athletic endurance and treating
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

Some people use NADH for treating
high blood pressure, high cholesterol, jet lag, depression, and Parkinson’s disease; boosting the immune system; opposing alcohol’s effects on the liver and the hormone testosterone; reducing signs of aging; and protecting against the side effects of an AIDS drug called zidovudine (AZT).

Healthcare providers sometimes give NADH by intramuscular (IM) or intravenous (IV) injection for Parkinson's disease and depression.

How does it work?
 

NADH produced by our bodies is involved in making energy in the body. While there is some evidence that suggests NADH supplements might reduce blood pressure, lower cholesterol, help chronic fatigue syndrome by providing energy, and increase nerve signals for people with Parkinson's disease, there isn't enough information to know for sure how or if these supplements work. 

 

Possibly Ineffective for:

 

NADH seems safe for most people when used appropriately and short-term, up to 12 weeks. Most people do not experience any side effects when taking the recommended amount each day, which is 10 mg. 

 

The appropriate dose of NADH depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for NADH. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

From WebMD



 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 11:51 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


Good information from everyone.  NADPH oxidase plays a major role in peroxynitrite formation (and in Alzheimer's disease), but  NADH oxidase apparently does not so nix my previous negative comments about NADH. NADH is a potent peroxynitrite scavenger, and if it reaches the brain in large enough concentrations it should be helpful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. 


 

http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/2/1/20 

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12153484 

 

Birkmayer claims that his is the only NADH supplement to cross the blood-brain barrier.  If true or if partially true this might explain the different results in the clinical trials. 


 

After realizing the potential of NADH in the 80s, but unable to administer it, Dr. Birkmayer, MD, Ph.D. developed, and patented, the only stable and absorbable form of NADH tablets. This patented product, Co-E1 (trademark), is the only NADH supplement that has been shown to cross the blood brain barrier. 


 


 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 9:38 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


Not sure how much of this is true, but it may further explain the variation in the results regarding NADH and Alzheimer's disease (from Dr. Birkmayer's site again). 


 

Taking an Co-E1® tablet with coffee, milk, apple juice, any juice, food, vitamins drugs, or other medications, destroys the pure stable, active NADH. Just about everything but water will destroy the stable NADH, unless its in your intestines.  Each NADH tablet is specially coated so it can "float" into your intestines, where it will be absorbed.  This is why it is so very important to take NADH with water only.

 

How to take NADH for a maximum energy effect:
Do not eat or drink for at least 4 to 6 hours, before taking Co-E1® It's best to take Co-E1® after waking up in the morning, on an empty stomach. Drink a large glass of water (6 to 8 ounces.) The water will help the tablet make it all the way to the intestines, passing the gastric juices quickly. The water will also help dilute acid conditions of the gastric juices. Saliva and the stomach's gastric juices will kill the NADH. Then wait 20 to 30 minutes before swallowing anything else but water. NADH is destroyed by taking medications, drugs, vitamins, by eating, or drinking anything else.

 

NADH needs some of your help to get into the intestines. The specially coated tablet dissolves in the the intestines and the NADH is absorbed into the body. Once in the body, it will cross the blood brain barrier, and enters the cells. Which cells are up to mother nature and your body's needs.

 

Oh, and don't lay down or go back to bed. You'll only make the trip harder for the tablet traveling to the intestines.

 

In some cases, a second daily dose of NADH may be desired. It is important that you take NADH at least 2 hours after eating or drinking anything other than water, and wait at least 20-30 minutes after you take NADH before eating a snack or meal.


onward
Posted: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 2:34 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


 

Lane, thanks very much for the additional info.

As you may have seen, this particular product that's supposed to be the best kind of NADH - the Co-E1 NADH - is sold as an enteric coated tablet that you swallow, but is also sold as a sublingual tablet.

 

It would seem that for many, the sublingual tablet would be a lot easier to take.

 

As you pointed out (thanks!), when taking the enteric-coated tablet you have to refrain from eating and drinking (except water) for specific time periods before and after, plus you have to drink the full glass of water, plus you can't lie down after taking it.  Sounds like the sublingual version would be so much easier.

 

But if I understand right, Birkmayer's highly successful 1996 study didn't use a sublingual tablet.  Maybe the sublingual form hadn't been developed yet.

 

I see at Amazon that more than one company is marketing the Co-E1 NADH in its various forms.

 

If this stuff truly does work for AD, it seems we should be seeing numerous testimonials to that effect.

 

Also I wonder why Birkmayer seems not to have published anything about NADH and AD since the 1990s.

 

Here's a bit more info about Birkmayer and his AD research:
http://www.wizardsgate.com/alzheim.htm


Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 2:49 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


Everything you said makes sense, Onward.  That Birkmayer does not seem to have published anything for such a long time struck me as odd, too.  Maybe even with the optimal form of delivery, there are limits to the effectiveness of NADH in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.  I hope that there will be further studies to shed some more light upon this.
onward
Posted: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 9:35 PM
Joined: 12/20/2011
Posts: 217


 

 This appears to be a much more recent study which found NADH to be helpful for Alzheimer's, but strangely I can't find a date on it.  Scholar.google.com says it was posted "96 days ago." 

 

 

 

Treatment of AD with Stabilized Oral NADH: Preliminary Findings 

 

 

 G.G. Kay, PhD, V. N. Starbuck, PhD and S. L. Cohan, MD, PhD 

 

Department of Neurology, Georgetown University School of Medicine 

 

 

 Abstract.   

 

 

 

A pilot randomized, double-blind clinical study of 21 patients with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) evaluated the effects of stabilized oral NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide; ENADA®) 10 mg QD (n=11) or placebo (n=10) on cognitive functions sensitive to changes in severity of dementia.  

 

 

NADH improved verbal recognition memory (p=.011) and verbal fluency(p=.034) from baseline to 6-months compared to placebo.  

 

 

A higher proportion of NADH -treated patients improved, than deteriorated or showed no change, on measures of verbal recognition memory and verbal fluency.  

 

 

 

Full paper here:

 

 

 

 

http://birkmayer-nadh.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/050617_Neurology-Article-Georgetown-ENADA-study.pdf   

 

 

___________________________________

 

 

 

 This seems to be Dr. Jorg Birkmayer's website:

http://birkmayer-nadh.com/wordpress/ 

 

Translated into English:
http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://birkmayer-nadh.com/wordpress/#translate-en 

 

____________________________________

 

 

 

Dr. Birkmayer will be speaking this December 3 in Albuquerque NM, and it's open to the public: 

 

http://www.thebirkmayerinstitute.com/40812.html 

 

____________________________________

 

 

 

Loads of research papers on NADH:

http://birkmayer-nadh.com/wordpress/?page_id=364 

 

____________________________________


Lane Simonian
Posted: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 10:06 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4782


Thanks for all the valuable information, Onward.  It is too bad that the one paper does not have a date on it.  All the references are from the 1980s and 1990s which may indicate that it is an older paper.  Perhaps, the safest conclusion one can reach is that NADH has some positive effects on some people with Alzheimer's disease. 


SunshineFour
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2013 4:30 PM
Joined: 12/29/2011
Posts: 17


Hi, found some more up-to date information here, it definitely seems that you have to take Prof Birkmayer's brand - link to you tube interview attached

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN-yhGrkvYA

http://www.birkmayer-vet.com/408_EN.0.htm

 

 


scma_2007
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2013 8:11 PM
Joined: 9/13/2013
Posts: 112


Thank you folks (Sunshine Four, Lane, Onward, Myriam) for your continous info on this.

 

I found this article on NADH -

   

 http://healthy-proteins.blogspot.com/2012/11/running-on-empty-fuel-up-with-nadh.html 

 

This link  shows a chemical reaction that I needed an organic chemistry teacher’s help to explain to me!!

 

 

 

 Excerpt:

 

How NADH Works

In order to understand how NADH works, it is first necessary to understand mitochondria. Picture the mitochondria as little engines - or energy producers - within each cell of your body. It's the job of your mitochondria to supply energy to your cells in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). But exactly how does that happen?

This is where NADH comes in. NADH sets off a chemical chain reaction by transforming Coenzyme Q10 into its reduced form. Then, in its reduced form, Co-Q10 becomes active and serves as the catalyst that makes it possible for the mitochondria to produce ATP. Every molecule of NADH results in the production of three molecules of ATP energy.

NADH is a critical component of your body's ability to function. Without NADH, the mitochondria cannot produce energy and the cells will die.

_______________________________________________________

 

Our 2 cents - As a user, Our concern – possible interaction?

 

Early this year, we bought Co-E1 (NADH) for my mom who is on Exelon. But we decided not to use it as I have read a person’s account that  it caused her mom who is on Aricept dizziness. Exelon (risvatigmine) and Aricept (donepezil) belong to the same drug family – cholinesterase inhibitors.

 

It seems to me that NADH is not widely used yet for those who are on AD drugs to know the drug interactions and contraindications. But the few scientific studies with the latest one in 2004 by Demarin V et al seems convincing enough that it is beneficial.


SunshineFour
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2013 11:20 AM
Joined: 12/29/2011
Posts: 17


Hi there did they use the Dr. Birkmayer brand, I have been told that is the only one to use?  Thanks
scma_2007
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2013 12:13 PM
Joined: 9/13/2013
Posts: 112


 

@SunshineFour - Yes. It was Birkmayer brand. The thinking is that it may have amplified the effect of the medication since NADH is a 'booster'. 


SunshineFour
Posted: Friday, November 1, 2013 12:55 PM
Joined: 12/29/2011
Posts: 17


thanks for confirming, that's a shame I was going to give it a try but as my parent is on the alz drugs mentioned it sounds like it would have a negative interaction