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Where is the outrage? Why aren’t we demanding human trial ASAP! Especially since the drug is already approved by the FDA?
Still Waters
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9:06 PM
Joined: 2/6/2012
Posts: 1092



lesa
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9:32 PM
Joined: 1/24/2012
Posts: 69


Im with you Still Waters, people just dont get it. Those that say dont rush out and buy this drug dont have a loved one with this terrible disease.  There is nothing else for us except things like this.  I too am struggling with the idea of bringing

my 58 year old husband home from the SNF.  After almost 4 weeks in the pysch

hospital I moved him into a SNF last Wed.  He has gone down hill so fast since he left our house.  IF I could find a doctor to write the perscription, I would be the first in line at the pharmacy.  Ive asked both his doctors and they say no. If he dies now or in 3 months what is the difference.  He would be the perfect candidate to test this out.  Time is not an option for us.  My heart breaks to have him in the SNF.I just wish those that dont know how bad this disease is  would stop telling us to wait. 


Still Waters
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9:42 PM
Joined: 2/6/2012
Posts: 1092


Thank you.
Still Waters
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9:45 PM
Joined: 2/6/2012
Posts: 1092


Studies show that life expectancy is cut in half after being placed in a nursing home.
lesa
Posted: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9:48 PM
Joined: 1/24/2012
Posts: 69


Also just to show you how the medical and research community have all the power in this game, I asked my husband's doctor to try using a combination of antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotics on him because I had read in Pub Med that this is something that needs to be explored.  She said no, cause it had not been proven to help.  Really?  I knew that but we were not talking about poison here. I actually had the anti-inflammitory and the antibiotics, I just needed the antiviral.   There are so many obstacles to this disease.  I hope someone posts here after they have tried the new drug to let us know the results.
Lane Simonian
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2012 10:18 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4845


Clinical trials for Bexarotene even if they start soon, will likely take a few years to complete.  The important questions are what is the therapeutic dose for Bexarotene, what are the side effects of this dose, is it as effective in human beings as it is in mice, and will it treat all stages of Alzheimer's disease.

 

Bexarotene (a retinoid analog) inhibits the development and aggregation of amyloid plaques in part by inhibiting the production of inducible nitric oxide and the subsequent production of peroxynitrites (the combination of inducible nitric oxide with superoxide anions).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21903077 

 

Clinical trials with another inducible nitric oxide inhibitor colostrinin have produced the following results:  improvements in people with mild Alzheimer's disease, stabilization in people with moderate Alzheimer's disease, no improvement in people with late Alzheimer's disease.  To treat Alzheimer's disease in the middle to later stages, requires a peroxynitrite scavenger that partially reverses the damage that peroxynitrites do to receptors, transport systems, and enzymes involved in short-term memory, mood, sleep, social recognition, social recognition, awareness, alertness, behavior, and smell.

 

I doubt this is going to sway your doctor, lesa, but here is further evidence that certain antibiotics such as minocycline, doxycycline, and rifampicn (called rifampin in the United States) may be effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. 

http://antibioticsfor.com/alzheimer.phtml 

http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v32/n11/full/1301377a.html 

http://www.jbc.org/content/286/7/4991.abstract 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9018471 

 

Several compounds in a variety of plants have protected against and ameliorated cognitive decline in animal studies by inhibiting the formation of peroxynitrites and by scavenging peroxynitrites.  Rosmarinic acid in rosemary supplements and eugenol in rosemary essential oil are two of these compounds.

 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166432807001313 

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ben/cbc/2006/00000002/00000001/art00005 

http://www.healthboards.com/boards/alzheimers-disease-dementia/14098-rosemary-alzheimers-treatment.html#post81784 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1479-8301.2009.00299.x/full 

 

Bexarotene may or may not prove to be an effective scavenger of peroxynitrites.  This will likely determine its effectiveness in treating the middle to late stages of Alzheimer's disease.  In the meantime, there are alternatives which likely not only stop the progression of the disease but also partially reverse it, even in the later stages.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2012 4:10 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4845


The Alzheimer's Research Forum has apparently moved its page on the pathogen hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease--to where I don't know.  I have a copy of the discussion.  The most relevant entries are the following:

 

Has anyone tested the use of antibiotics for Alzheimer's patients?  My mother was diagnosed with the disease more than seven years ago.  Although she quit after the diagnosis, she was a heavy smoker most of her life, which resulted in congestion problems.  Over the last seven years she was given antibiotics several times.  Each time her condition improved dramatically.  When she stopped the medication she reverted back to the way she was before.  She is now in the last stages of her disease and refuses to eat or drink.  She was sent to the emergency room and not expected to survive the night.  They gave her an antibiotic drip and by the next day she was fighting to go home.  She recognized us, was able to put three words together, and understood and responded to everything we said to her.  She even played a joke on my sister, pretending to be dead and then jump up laughing because she scared her.

 

She has not been this responsive in close to a year!  I attriubte it to the antibiotic drip.  In the past when she took antibiotics orally she significantly improved but the drip seemed to really make a huge difference.  I hope something can be done to research this.  I am trying to tell everyone I can.  Please let me know if this has been researched.

 

Reply from Brian Balin, Ph.D., Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine--Posted 20 July 2004

 

Remarkably, this is something that has been recognized by clinicians for many, many years.  I have innumerable accounts from individuals who have reported on exactly the same response.  There have been reports back to me of individuals who have not spoken for years that have "recovered" this ability following antibiotic therapy.  Is the response specific to treating an infection systematically in the brain, or does it have to do with an anti-inflammatory action of the antibiotics?  We just don't have the answers to these questions at this time.  In my estimation, there has to be a mandate in this for performing clinical trials based on the antibiotic approach.  Hopefully, we can convince the NIH or big pharma that these trials would be worthwhile.

 

Q. by Donna Walraven, MSW--Posted 23 January 2009

 

When my father was alive there was an occasion where he had a serious bladder infection that was finally treated by a urologist outside of the nursing home where he stayed in Port Lavaca, Texas.  The urologist gave him powerful antibiotics.  After a few days on these antibiotics my father became lucid for over a week.  He did not know my name before; now he was calling me by name again, and not just responding to questions, but actually carrying on a conversation with me.

 

It was a gift because soon after this episode he was overfed again and had to be resuscitated for the third time, but this time something happened to his throat and he was unable to eat again.  He died about 10 days later. 

 

I just thought that someone should know because it did seem to help him for a time.

 

Now compare these observation with the son who gave his mother rosemary.

 

My mother is in the final stages of Alzheimer's disease and was given a rough estimate of only 6 more months of life back in November.... I was able to get the doctor's permission to give this herb [rosemary] to my mother and we figured at least it could not hurt.  Much to my surprise there has been a noticeable change.  There has been quite a few days now where my mom has been more focused and alert than she's been in a long time.  I even got some news from one of her nurses who said my mother had a brief conversation with her.  It's been at least a year or two since I can remember anything like that.  This change has also been noticed by others on the nursing staff as well as by her doctor, who is very surprised.  Now I'm not suggesting this is any kind of a "cure" for Alzheimer's but the improvement in my mother's condition is something to be said about Rosemary and it's given me some more quality time with her that I thought had been a thing of the past. 

 

And here's a story from the Ecumen's Awakening's program which among other things uses aromatherapy to help it's nursing home patients with Alzheimer's disease. 

 

Babcock keeps a notepad of his father's words, the first he had heard him utter in two years.  "He said, 'That's our son, Gary.' I heard it as I was leaving the room and I couldn't believe it."

http://www.kare11.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=944914 

 

I am a trained historian not a trained scientist (although I do have some background in biology).  I am taught to listen to other people's stories.  I am not a big fan of the idea of a placebo effect but in any case an Alzheimer's patient is unlikely to be aware that what is being given to him or her is meant to help.  And if there is a placebo effect among the caregiver, it helps that other observers without a strong personal stake in the patient notices the same improvements.

 

It is possible that Bexarotene will some day be an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease, but in the meantime there already appears to be effective treatments for this disease.  The fact that Bexarotene is being touted by a major pharmaceutical firm shouldn't overshadow research on other compounds which have accomplished the same thing and more in that they have resulted in significant improvements in human beings, even at the latest stages of the disease.


Myriam
Posted: Thursday, February 16, 2012 7:49 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Thanks, Lane!