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Poor Dental Health Linked to Dementia Onset in Japan
Myriam
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2012 7:34 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


From Alzheimer's Daily News:


(Source: Medscape) - Poor dental health has been linked to an increased risk for dementia, new research shows.

In a study of more than 4000 elderly adults in Japan, those who had few teeth and who did not use dentures or who did not visit a dentist regularly had a significantly higher risk for dementia onset than the participants who practiced better dental health practices.

 

Go to full story: http://www.medscape.com


Johanna C.
Posted: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 1:06 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11213


Poor dentition contributes to heart disease; this has been known thru university studies for a long while.  This is why teeth cleaning and daily flossing is so important as well as having our dentist take care of our dental issues. 

 

Tooth plaque, if not removed, will actually travel and the constituents of the plaque will contribute to the constriction and blockage of blood vessels thereby contributing as one of the causative factors of heart disease.

 

When the vessels are constricted and blocked, this also includes the many, many small vessels in the brain.  When this happens, this contributes to the onset of dementia. 

 

So - tooth cleaning every six months and flossing on a daily basis. 

 

SMILE everyone!

 

Johanna C.


Myriam
Posted: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 9:19 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Wow, Johanna! Thanks for the info.
Swarfmaker
Posted: Sunday, April 29, 2012 3:58 PM
Joined: 3/28/2012
Posts: 13


 

Is this the article?

 


Association Between Self-Reported Dental Health Status and Onset of Dementia: A 4-Year Prospective Cohort Study of Older Japanese Adults from the Aichi Gerontological Evaluation Study (AGES) Project.

Psychosom Med. 2012 Apr;74(3):241-8. Epub 2012 Mar 9.
Yamamoto T, Kondo K, Hirai H, Nakade M, Aida J, Hirata Y.

Abstract

Objectives Studies have shown that people with cognitive impairment have poor dental health. However, the direction of causality remains unknown. This prospective cohort study aimed to determine the association between four self-reported dental health variables and dementia onset in older Japanese people. Methods Analysis was conducted on 4425 residents 65 years or older. Four self-reported dental health variables included the number of teeth and/or use of dentures, ability to chew, presence/absence of a regular dentist, and taking care of dental health. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires given in 2003. Records of dementia onset during 2003 to 2007 were obtained from municipalities in charge of the public long-term care insurance system. Age, income, body mass index, present illness, alcohol consumption, exercise, and forgetfulness were used as covariates. Results Dementia onset was recorded in 220 participants. Univariate Cox proportional hazards models showed significant associations between the dental health variables and dementia onset. In models fully adjusted for all covariates, hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of dementia onset of respondents were as follows: 1.85 (1.04-3.31) for those with few teeth and without dentures; 1.25 (0.81-1.93) for those who could not chew very well; 1.44 (1.04-2.01) for those who did not have a regular dentist; and 1.76 (0.96-3.20) for those who did not take care of their dental health. Conclusions Few teeth without dentures and absence of a regular dentist, not poor mastication and poor attitudes toward dental health, were associated with higher risk of dementia onset in the older Japanese cohort even after adjustment for available covariates.

PMID:22408130[PubMed - in process]

  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22408130

 

  Compare this with: 

Alzheimer's disease - a neurospirochetosis. Analysis of the evidence following Koch's and Hill's criteria.

Judith Miklossy

Correspondence: Judith Miklossy
Journal of Neuroinflammation 2011, 8:90 doi:10.1186/1742-2094-8-90

Published: 4 August 2011

Abstract (provisional)

It is established that chronic spirochetal infection can cause slowly progressive dementia, brain atrophy and amyloid deposition in late neurosyphilis.

Recently it has been suggested that various types of spirochetes, in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum, could cause dementia and may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Here, we review all data available in the literature on the detection of spirochetes in AD and critically analyze the association and causal relationship between spirochetes and AD following established criteria of Koch and Hill.

The results show a statistically significant association between spirochetes and AD (P = 1.5 x 10-17, OR = 20, 95% CI = 8-60, N = 247).
When neutral techniques recognizing all types of spirochetes were used, or the highly prevalent periodontal pathogen Treponemas were analyzed, spirochetes were observed in the brain in more than 90% of AD cases.

Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in the brain in 25.3% of AD cases analyzed and was 13 times more frequent in AD compared to controls.

Periodontal pathogen Treponemas (T. pectinovorum, T. amylovorum, T. lecithinolyticum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. socranskii) and Borrelia burgdorferi were detected using species specific PCR and antibodies.

Importantly, co-infection with several spirochetes occurs in AD.

The pathological and biological hallmarks of AD were reproduced in vitro.

The analysis of reviewed data following Koch's and Hill's postulates shows a probable causal relationship between neurospirochetosis and AD.

Persisting inflammation and amyloid deposition initiated and sustained by chronic spirochetal infection form together with the various hypotheses suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD a comprehensive entity.

As suggested by Hill, once the probability of a causal relationship is established prompt action is needed.

Support and attention should be given to this field of AD research.

Spirochetal infection occurs years or decades before the manifestation of dementia.

As adequate antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies are available, as in syphilis, one might prevent and eradicate dementia.

...

Conclusion

Various types of spirochetes, including B. burgdorferi, and six periodontal pathogen spirochetes ((T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, T. denticola, T. medium, T. amylovorum and T. maltophilum) were detected in the brains of AD patients.

The pathological and biological hallmarks of AD, including increased AβPP level, Aβ deposition and tau phosphorylation were induced by spirochetes in vitro.

The statistical analysis showed a significant association between spirochetes and AD. The strongly significant association, the high risk factor and the analysis of data following Koch’s and Hill’s criteria, are indicative of a causal relationship between neurospirochetoses and AD.

Spirochetes are able to escape destruction by the host immune reactions and establish chronic infection and sustained inflammation.

In vivo studies with long exposure times will be necessary to efficiently study the sequence of events and the cellular mechanisms involved in spirochete induced AD-type host reactions and Aβ-plaque, “tangle” and “granulovacuolar” formation.

The characterization of all types of spirochetes and co-infecting bacteria and viruses is needed, in order to develop serological tests for the early detection of infection.

The pathological process is thought to begin long before the diagnosis of dementia is made therefore, an appropriate targeted treatment should start early in order to prevent dementia.

Persisting spirochetal infection and their persisting toxic components can initiate and sustain chronic inflammatory processes through the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system involving various signaling pathways.

In the affected brain the pathogens and their toxic components can be observed, along with host immunological responses.

The response itself is characteristic of chronic inflammatory processes associated with the site of tissue damage.

The outcome of infection is determined by the genetic predisposition of the patient, by the virulence and biology of the infecting agent
and by various environmental factors, such as exercise, stress and nutrition.

The accumulated knowledge, the various views, and hypotheses proposed to explain the pathogenesis of AD form together a comprehensive entity when observed in the light of a persisting chronic inflammation and amyloid deposition initiated and sustained by chronic spirochetal infection.

As suggested by Hill, once the probability of a causal relationship is established prompt action is needed. Similarly to syphilis, one may prevent and eradicate dementia in AD.

The impact on healthcare costs and on the suffering of the patients would be substantial.
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/8/1/90/abstract
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/pdf/1742-2094-8-90.pdf
 


Alzheimer's disease - a neurospirochetosis. Analysis of the evidence following Koch's and Hill's criteria.
Miklossy J.
J Neuroinflammation. 2011 Aug 4;8(1):90. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract

ABSTRACT: It is established that chronic spirochetal infection can cause slowly progressive dementia, brain atrophy and amyloid deposition in late neurosyphilis. Recently it has been suggested that various types of spirochetes, in an analogous way to Treponema pallidum, could cause dementia and may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we review all data available in the literature on the detection of spirochetes in AD and critically analyze the association and causal relationship between spirochetes and AD following established criteria of Koch and Hill. The results show a statistically significant association between spirochetes and AD (P = 1.5 x 10-17, OR = 20, 95% CI = 8-60, N = 247). When neutral techniques recognizing all types of spirochetes were used, or the highly prevalent periodontal pathogen Treponemas were analyzed, spirochetes were observed in the brain in more than 90% of AD cases. Borrelia burgdorferi was detected in the brain in 25.3% of AD cases analyzed and was 13 times more frequent in AD compared to controls. Periodontal pathogen Treponemas (T. pectinovorum, T. amylovorum, T. lecithinolyticum, T. maltophilum, T. medium, T. socranskii) and Borrelia burgdorferi were detected using species specific PCR and antibodies. Importantly, co-infection with several spirochetes occurs in AD. The pathological and biological hallmarks of AD were reproduced in vitro. The analysis of reviewed data following Koch's and Hill's postulates shows a probable causal relationship between neurospirochetosis and AD. Persisting inflammation and amyloid deposition initiated and sustained by chronic spirochetal infection form together with the various hypotheses suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD a comprehensive entity. As suggested by Hill, once the probability of a causal relationship is established prompt action is needed. Support and attention should be given to this field of AD research. Spirochetal infection occurs years or decades before the manifestation of dementia. As adequate antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies are available, as in syphilis, one might prevent and eradicate dementia.

PMID: 21816039 [PubMed]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21816039
More info in the provisional full text pdf: http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/pdf/1742-2094-8-90.pdf