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solanezumab,
ffwife54@yahoo.com
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 12:38 PM
Joined: 4/15/2012
Posts: 247


Does anyone know more about this study? How you qualify and how to get involved

  

 Dr. Sperling is leading a groundbreaking new study on individuals whose brain scans show plaque buildups but do not yet demonstrate clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s or other dementias. She will be testing the effectiveness of the Eli Lilly drug solanezumab, which in previous studies has shown might have promise with people that have a milder form of Alzheimer’


SunnyCA
Posted: Friday, March 8, 2013 4:08 PM
Joined: 2/14/2012
Posts: 1752


The trial will enroll 1,000 people 70 and older with evidence of amyloid in their brains (by amyloid PET), but who do not show clinical symptoms of the disease.

 

I'm not finding anything else -- it does not appear to be posted at clinicaltrial.gov yet.


ffwife54@yahoo.com
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2013 6:17 PM
Joined: 4/15/2012
Posts: 247


It seems there are not very-if any research studies for folks who have MCI. Everyone talks about catching or identifying Alz early to help determine how it progresses and yet most don't want participants with MCI....UGH!

Myriam
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2013 3:26 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


I wonder if this study on solanezumab is related to a drink called sovanaid in England and that is why it's not listed on Trial Match (because it's considered a supplement and not a pharmacological).  Here's an article on sovanaid: 

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/elderhealth/9784141/A-glimmer-of-hope-for-dementia-sufferers.html 


ilovemygrey
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2013 4:45 PM
Joined: 1/30/2013
Posts: 66


hi, I just want to say that I am going to be in a new Clinical Trial with my Neurologist.. starting in about 6  or 7 mo.. I am getting my right knee replaced 1st , then doing the clinical Trial  with my Dr, and his nurse.. I live in Indiana.. Hope U can also find a Clinical Trial too.. where do U live? I do have MCI too.. just got diagnosed in Jan this year.. Lisa C
ffwife54@yahoo.com
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2013 5:30 PM
Joined: 4/15/2012
Posts: 247


I live Wisconsin and am 55years old. My neurologist works at Froedert Hospital in  Milwaukee. We have a ARDC Madison.

 

I don't know where to start looking, I thought i saw somewhere that you had to be older and met some other criteria that I didn't meet?

 

 

 


ilovemygrey
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:12 PM
Joined: 1/30/2013
Posts: 66


hi, my neurologist says I am young and he caught this earily.. I am 60 last December. I do have MCI also. so, I am happy he wants me in this clinical Trial.. so, we will see how it goes after I get my new right knee.. hope U can find a clinical Trial.. Let me know if U do.. what does your Dr say about your wanting to be in a Clinical Trial? I did not ask my Dr what he meant about catching this earily... I will ask him for sure.. Lisa C
ffwife54@yahoo.com
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2013 6:52 PM
Joined: 4/15/2012
Posts: 247


Yes, I would love to hear what your Dr says about "catching it" early? Is your Dr who specializes in Alz and other Dementias including MCI?

 

It is so hard to find others with a MCI diagnosis and when you do there is so much differing opinions about what MCI will lead to.

 

I was told to get my affairs in order two years ago and did. I would like having another person with MCI to chat with. Do you use FaceBook maybe we can connect that way?



Myriam
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2013 12:49 AM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


I'm in the MCI stage of Alzheimer's, but because I have the Presenilin 1 gene I will eventually go into Alzheimer's if a cure or something to stop the progression doesn't come along.  

 

Mild cognitive impairment causes cognitive changes that are serious enough to be noticed by the individuals experiencing them or to other people, but the changes are not severe enough to interfere with daily life or independent function.  

 

Because the changes caused by MCI are not severe enough to affect your daily life, MCI does not meet diagnostic guidelines for dementia. However, those with MCI have an increased risk of eventually developing Alzheimer's or another type of dementia. However, not all people with MCI get worse and some eventually get better.  

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2013 11:03 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4814


Solanezumab is a drug designed to lower amyloid plaque levels.  It showed no efficacy for people with Alzheimer's beyond the mild stages of the disease and showed very little efficacy for those in the mild stages.   

 

Eli Lily--the manufacturer of the drug--has convinced Dr. Sperling to study the drug as a possible preventive measure in people with high amyloid plaque levels.  Eli Lily also controls an imaging agent for amyloid plaques, so if their hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease can be prevented by removing amyloid plaques, it will be a double victory for them. 

 

Two problems, though.  Solanezumab does not remove all of the plaques and amyloid plaques are only a so-so predictor of the progression from MCI to Alzheimer's disease. 

 

A much better predictor is myo-inositol. 

 

VIENNA, Austria -- March 12, 2013 -- Myo-Inositol and N-acetylaspartate are sensitive biomarkers for clinical conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to a study presented here at the 25th Annual European Congress of Radiology (ECR).

 

Comparison of patients with progressive disease versus those who developed AD for the cingulate gyrus showed the increased myo-inositol-to-water ratio to be 72% predictive for dementia; similarly for the hippocampus, it was 70% predictive for dementia.

 

http://www.docguide.com/myo-inositol-n-acetylaspartate-are-sensitive-biomarkers-conversion-mci-alzheimers-disease?tsid=5 

 

Myo-inositol is the precursor molecule to amyloid plaques and more importantly to peroxynitrites.  It also (like the presenilin 1 gene mutation) appears to cut of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/AKT pathway which is neuroprotective. 

 

Lithium and scyllo-inositol are known inhibitors of myo-inositol in the brain, but are not safe.  Ferulic acid and glucuronolactone may lower myo-inositol levels in the brain and are also peroxynitrite scavengers, but their efficacy and safety are not fully known.  


ilovemygrey
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:16 AM
Joined: 1/30/2013
Posts: 66


hi,, yes, I do have facebook too.. I do know what  my Dr said.. he was glad he caught it earily..but, who knows what he meant by that! I am going to ask him when I go to see him in April 19th. so, at my apt, I will ask him.. what is your name on Facebook? Lisa Culp
ilovemygrey
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:46 AM
Joined: 1/30/2013
Posts: 66


hi, how did you find out you have a gene connected with developing Alz? just wondering.. I do not know if I have that or not.. they took 2 vials of Blood when I have been tested with EEG and MRI.. but, I do not know if I have any genes connected with Alz.. Lisa C
ilovemygrey
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:48 AM
Joined: 1/30/2013
Posts: 66


hi FFwife54@yahoo.com I will contact U that way ok? Lisa C
SunnyCA
Posted: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 1:07 PM
Joined: 2/14/2012
Posts: 1752


ilovemygrey wrote:
hi, how did you find out you have a gene connected with developing Alz? just wondering.. I do not know if I have that or not.. they took 2 vials of Blood when I have been tested with EEG and MRI.. but, I do not know if I have any genes connected with Alz.. Lisa C

.

 

Hi, Lisa.  Myriam has an extremely rare condition that is found in only a handful of families in the world.  In families with "early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (eFAD)", the disease typically strikes at a very young age -- often in the 40s or 50s -- and appears at such a young age in every generation.

 

So, for you to have one of the eFAD genes, one of your parents would have had Alzheimer's when they were very young, and one of that parent's parents would have had Alzheimer's when they were very young, and so on.

 

The vast majority of Alzheimer's -- including the vast majority of young-onset -- is what is called "sporadic".  It is not inherited per se.  There are certain genes that increase your risk of developing Alzheimer's, such as the APOE4 allele, but you can carry those genes and never develop the disease ... and you can develop Alzheimer's without carrying those genes.