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Alzheimer's Markers Predict Start of Mental Decline
Myriam
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 4:12 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


(Source: Medicalxpress) - Scientists have already identified many of the biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease that could potentially predict which patients will develop the disorder later in life. Now, studying spinal fluid samples and health data from 201 research participants, the researchers have shown the markers are accurate predictors of Alzheimer's years before symptoms develop.

"We wanted to see if one marker was better than the other in predicting which of our participants would get cognitive impairment and when they would get it," said Catherine Roe."We found no differences in the accuracy of the biomarkers."

The researchers evaluated markers such as the buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain, newly visible thanks to an imaging agent developed in the last decade; levels of various proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, such as the amyloid fragments that are the principal ingredient of brain plaques; and the ratios of one protein to another in the cerebrospinal fluid, such as different forms of the brain cell structural protein tau.

They found that all of the markers were equally good at identifying subjects who were likely to develop cognitive problems and at predicting how soon they would become noticeably impaired.

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http://medicalxpress.com 
Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 7:45 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7029


And: how many insurance plans will pay for the tests?  

I firmly believe that a lot of my longer stay in the Early Stage is due to my having bee diagnosed early.


Queens artist
Posted: Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:27 PM
Joined: 8/17/2012
Posts: 12


The biomarkers are important indicators for MCI. I had the lumbar punture done and it was painless. I had no side effects. My amyloid protein levels were low while my total tau level was high which indicates that there is AD pathology going on in my brain(same pathology found on autopsy) From what I understand my MCI has converted to AD. As soon as the test came back they put me on Aricept and Namenda.
ilovemygrey
Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2013 7:32 PM
Joined: 1/30/2013
Posts: 66


hi, I have MCI andMy Dr put me on Namenda  last month, and  now, he has given me a 3 month Rx for it too.. I have to go to him again , my neurologist, on the 24th of this month. How did you get put on Namenda and Aricept too?? I have not been diagnosed with Alzheimer's yet.. but, I may get it.. I do not know.. but, my Dr said I am glad we caught this earily ! I do not know what he meant by that.. I am going to ask him for sure when I go with my h and daughter to my next apt.. glad to chat with  U... Lisa Culp
Mimi S.
Posted: Saturday, May 18, 2013 7:37 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7029


The earlier the disease is diagnosed the better the chances, if you work hard, are at stayig in the Early Stages longer. I'm at 6 years plus and still live by myself!
cantthinkofonenow
Posted: Thursday, July 4, 2013 4:14 AM
Joined: 7/4/2013
Posts: 4


 

 

There is one thing I am aware of and it’s the huge increase of Alzheimer’s cases. Also there is a huge increase of people taking prescription drugs. My girlfriend of four years is a pain management patient from a back injury she had surgery for and was given a fusion cage. 

She has been on various medications for many years. Norco, valium, soma and Finnegan. Although she has never taken any of the oxy's.  

 She is 50 now and cant remember where she put something 5 min earlier. Forgets a four digit pass code at least once a month if not twice. Goes shopping and doesn’t remember purchasing items she puts away and never touches them, when they are hygiene products she absolutely needs. There has to be a link of some kind between these drugs, her memory and this disease. Also her cognitive skills do not get used very much at all, as she has not been employed for over 20 years. No one in her family uses prescription meds and none have ever had this disease either. All of her relatives who died of old age were sharp, but one and it was only dementia at 94. 

Of course if there is a link, we will never know because it would be just too hard to know which drugs exactly in combination with poor diet and exercise. Cigarette and illicit drug use is also a factor with her, but in moderation. She doesn’t drink alcohol.  

 

She has not been diagnosed with alzheimer's. Yet!

 

 

 

 

 


Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, July 4, 2013 11:31 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16640


Dementia is more than being absent-minded and forgetting where you put something.  Before a diagnosis of dementia is made a thorough evaluation including history, physical examination, lab tests, imaging studies and neurocognitive testing must be done to determine the nature and the source of the difficulty. 

There may be nutritional or hormonal reasons why there is memory loss, or other reasons such as the side effect of medications (a common cause) or other medical diseases, or depression, or sleep apnea or head trauma, among others. 

It's best to get tested because some causes can be treated and the memory loss can be reversed or mitigated.

Iris L.

Myriam
Posted: Thursday, July 4, 2013 11:31 AM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


It sounds like your friend needs to find a doctor who specializes in dementia.  He or she would be able to look at the list of prescriptions and over the counter medications she is taking to determine if the mixture of meds is causing her confusion and memory lapses or if she has some sort of dementia.  Alzheimer's can be genetic, but it is usually sporadic, meaning it shows up in a person even though no one else in the family has ever shown symptoms of AD. 


 

I've been traveling to California, Tennessee and am now in Maryland.  Am tired, but still able to handle it.  In the last 10 days, I've only had 2 or 3 "bad" days. So far, so good. 


 

Have a great 4th of July!!!