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Montelukast (Singulair) clinical trial delayed
Larrytherunner
Posted: Saturday, August 18, 2018 6:45 AM
Joined: 2/26/2016
Posts: 172


I wrote earlier that the montelukast (Singulair) clinical trial for Alzheimer's was expected to start in early 2018, which is what the sponsor, Intelgenx, had posted. Unfortunately the trial has not started yet, but according in an investment blog for the company, will start soon. Health Canada, Canada's equivalent of the FDA, is supervising the trial, and they have conducted longer than expected reviews of study protocol, and there have been delays in the training of clinical staff. The blog says that the trial should begin very soon. This means that we won't get the results until the middle of 2019, unless some results leak out before then.

I have been taking montelukast since February 2016, and my extreme mental fatigue and occasional confusion disappeared soon after I started, so I believe they will get good results when the trial is completed.


Geof
Posted: Monday, August 27, 2018 7:06 PM
Joined: 8/27/2018
Posts: 2


Hi,

I read the article in the New Scientist "Old Rat Brains Rejuvenated and New Neurons Grown by Asthma Drug" Oct 23, 2015. Becoming forgetful of names I decided to try Singulair myself. Prior to taking it I sought out a cognitive test taking one developed  www.FoodForTheBrain.org and I didn't score very well. I initiated 10mg of Singulair on 3/18/2016. In June 2016 my doctor diagnosed me with early Alzheimer's. I persisted with Singulair taking a daily dose of 10mg for most of this time (for one quarter I raised it to 20mg). Attached are the results of my experiment. Yes,I am sure there is some "test learning" going on but given that I have Alzheimer's that should not be an issue!!

Geof

File Attachment(s):
Cognitive Test.pdf (104839 bytes)

Larrytherunner
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 2:35 PM
Joined: 2/26/2016
Posts: 172


Hi Geof. I am on a cross country bus trip in Ghana with my wife and kids, visiting my wife's relations, and it is hard for me to write something, but I am trying. I also read about Dr Ludwig Aigner's research, and I started taking montelukast (Singulair) in February 2016, and saw that my mental fatigue disappeared within a week.  The doctors gave me lots of lab tests to rule out other things, but I never took any mental tests. I know the dementia was affecting me because I had difficulty concentrating and had some memory confusion.

Your results show a big improvement in your results. I assume it was mostly testing your short term memory. It sounds like you are back to normal. That has been my experience. My dementia was at an early stage and now I am completely back to normal if I take the drug every day.

I was wondering how you were able to get the montelukast. For me it is no problem since I live in a country where buying this drug does not require a prescription, but so many people have written me that they can't get a prescription from their neurologist. I always tell them to try to get a prescription from a GP, primary care doctor, etc who would be more familiar with this very safe drug.

Thanks for telling us about your experience.


markus8174
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2018 9:57 PM
Joined: 1/25/2018
Posts: 531


I've had my DW on Montelukast- beginning at 10mg and gradually increasing to 30mg/day. As a last resort I've now increased to 40mg/day. It hasn't been a cure. I have noticed an increase in her focus and improvement in her short term memory. Before increasing  to 40mg/day she was slipping fast. She didn't remember our daughters much of the time, and couldn't even enjoy a baseball game- one of her favorite pastimes. Now she and I enjoy the game each night. She worries about both the daughters, and can carry on a fairly normal conversation. She may not remember the conversation 30minutes later, but at 40mg/day her quality of life has significantly improved. I hope the slowing of her decline continues, Montelukast being therapeutic, not just palliative. We can just watch and pray. Thank-you Larry, and all my friends on this forum for the many tips and advice you have provided. For those of you with dementia, or caring for a loved one, please read my posts concerning Meclofenamate. It is a "Fenamate" class NSAID that I have been using for my DW for several years. It also showed a significant improvement in her cognitive abilities. Unfortunately, it has many unwanted side effects and health risks, but in her risk/benefit ratio we decided it was worth the danger. (she was clear enough to make this decision with me!)
Geof
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 12:29 PM
Joined: 8/27/2018
Posts: 2


Finding a GP who will prescribe Montelucast (Singulair) for Alzheimers can be tricky. I have my own experience well documented with the graph. Two out of three GPs didn't have a problem, one here in the US and one in Canada. The third one here in Florida almost threw me out of his office!
Larrytherunner
Posted: Saturday, April 20, 2019 11:07 AM
Joined: 2/26/2016
Posts: 172


Geof, you have to be really determined to get a prescription for this drug as a treatment for Alzheimer's. I think it might be easier for some people to say that they have taken it in the past for asthma and want to start again. Of coarse if the doctor has their records, that won't work. Once you find the right doctor, it is a lot easier. I am lucky that I don't need a prescription here in Ghana.

 

As for dosage, I have found that 10mg once a day is not enough to last all day. My experience is that 10mg twice day is enough. I myself am taking 10mg three times a day with no bad side effects.

 

The montelukast clinical trial is now going smoothly. I looks like we will get some midpoint data in a few months. Stay tuned.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 10:54 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4550


This may be a foreshadowing of the Montelukast trial results (although the suggestion that it may prevent dementia is probably too optimistic):

Cognitive decline and dementia are a growing problem as the population ages. Effective therapies to prevent and treat these problems are limited. Neuro-inflammation has been suggested as a cause of dementia [1]. Montelukast is a leukotriene receptor antagonist used to treat seasonal allergies and asthma. It acts as a cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT1) receptor antagonist blocking the action of leukotrienes and decreasing inflammation [2]. Animal studies have shown that administering Montelukast improves memory function [3]. This case series of patients in a private Internal Medicine practice between 2013-2014 used Montelukast in patients with various levels of memory impairment and dementia. Patients were given Montelukast 80 mg daily in 4 divided doses every 2-3 hours. Memory impaired patients had subjective improvement in the memory and recall. Patients with dementia were noted by family members to be less agitated, but had no memory improvement at the doses used. Montelukast may be useful to treat memory impairment and dementia. Long term use might act as a prophylactic to prevent dementia.