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New member, is anyone out there?
Ebyn
Posted: Wednesday, December 8, 2021 12:09 PM
Joined: 12/8/2021
Posts: 2


Gender Queer adoptee caring for mom long distance. Looking for community support.
KB NOLA
Posted: Monday, December 27, 2021 11:18 PM
Joined: 8/7/2020
Posts: 1


Hi-First time here…first post. I’m a 53 yr old lesbian (out since age 19) with a Mom living with what seems to be rapidly progressing dementia She is cared for 100% of the time by my Dad, who is amazing, & becoming exhausted. 

While I do have the support of my ex-partners, particularly my 13 yr old daughter’s other Mom, I’m beginning to notice that 

being single and going through this alone is pretty brutal.

I am probably well suited to offer someone else (who isn’t me with my situation) some support.

 


Camoruso
Posted: Tuesday, December 28, 2021 11:05 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Happy to see some people using this site.  I'm a 66 year old lesbian that's a full time  caregiver for my spouse with early onset. No family close by. I do have my partner in a senior day care 2 days/ week so I get a little break. It's a difficult life in any situation. I started noticing changes in my partner in 2015. She retired that year and was diagnosed in 2017.  She was able to stay home alone until I retired in 2020. I'm willing to offer any knowledge I've gained along the way or just to listen when you need to vent. This disease sucks and it is, at times, a very lonely road.
jfdiscuss
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2022 6:13 AM
Joined: 12/24/2021
Posts: 3


Also new -- who else is out there?
jfdiscuss
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2022 6:30 AM
Joined: 12/24/2021
Posts: 3


Yes, being single and going through it alone isn't easy  if only because so much of the support groups don't recognize single people. I hope that we can improve things with this site
jfdiscuss
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2022 6:55 AM
Joined: 12/24/2021
Posts: 3


the offer to share with others is SO important (IMO). We're on our own so often with this disease and being gay. I'm new to this so really appreciate finding a place to share (and sometimes vent). Please keep posting --- and if there is a better place to post, let  us know. (There's a totally empty chat room -- that discouraged me for quite a while. People hat walking into empty rooms (digitally or in life) so we have to  share with each other
Camoruso
Posted: Tuesday, January 4, 2022 11:17 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


jfdiscuss - I agree we really need each other.I read the spouse/partner section and have learned so much. I've always hoped more people would stick with this one but comments are few and far between.

My partner has early onset diagnosed in 2017 but I began noticing signs in 2015. It's a tough and lonely road and any support we can give one anothercan really help.


NickyB
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2022 7:09 PM
Joined: 1/5/2022
Posts: 3


Hi, I am a new member 

from Rhode Island. 

I am a lesbian caring full time 

for my partner of 35 years.

She has not been officially 

diagnosed but her MD firmly believes 

her to be suffering from Alzheimers 

after many tests.

I am finding it challenging at times.

Looking for someone who can identify 

with my experience to possibly share ideas.

Thank you.

 


NickyB
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2022 7:16 PM
Joined: 1/5/2022
Posts: 3


Hi 

I am close to your age and a lesbian 

who is  caring full-time for my partner.

She is suffering from Alzheimers 

and sometimes it can be challenging. 

If you ever want to talk, I would be 

very interested in learning more.

Thank you.


Camoruso
Posted: Wednesday, January 5, 2022 10:52 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Hi NickyB! Welcome. It was scary in the beginning seeing changes and hoping I wS wrong. This definitely was not what we planned for our retirement but it is the card we were dealt. 

The first steps for my partner was testing done by her primary. Then we went to a Neuro Psychologist who did more testing. He said it was mild cognitive impairment which seems to be the 1st term they use. He wanted an MRI and a Neurologist to see her before making a set diagnosis.

The Neurologist was an idiot and we stuck with just the primary until this summer. My partner's agitation and then aggression got bad so now we see a Geriatric Psychiatrist. That has helped tremendously. Medication was never something we wanted but it has become necessary.

Legally I found a Lesbian lawyer and we did a durable power of attorney, a medical POA. She reviewed other things with me to be sure there would be no problems in the future. Many people on the spouse/partner forum recommend an elder law attorney. Different states have different laws. We live in New Mexico.

Let me know if there's anything specific I can answer for you. I'm not an expert but I'll help if I can.

 


Hopefulson
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2022 12:53 AM
Joined: 1/19/2022
Posts: 1


Hi Camoruso

I'm sorry to hear about the situation with your partner.  May I ask what type of therapy or medication the geriatric psychiatrist prescribed?  In what way has it been helpful? 

I have a mother who is undiagnosed, but she's been exhibiting a lot of aggression and irritability along with forgetfulness and some other symptoms.  I would love to pursue the therapy or psychiatry route to see if this will help.  

Camoruso
Posted: Wednesday, January 19, 2022 11:35 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Hi Hopefulson,

The PCP at first prescribed Quetiapine (Seoquel) for the agitation/agression. My partner complained that she was dizzy and didn't feel good. She refused to take the meds. That's when her primary sent her to the geriatric psychiatrist. She said they are more familiar with a variety of meds that would help. It's a hard decision with these meds. It seems they all have side effects and different ones work for different people. The psychiatrist was a godsend for me. She immediately started my partner on Olanzapine. It's not her intention to keep her on it forever. In the beginning she took 2.5 mg twice a day. Then we backed off to once a day. Because she showed agression at day care she gets the extra pill only on the 2 mornings she attends day care. So far, the agression is in check. I was hesitant at first to be going to a psychiatrist but not anymore. She has made it possible to keep my partner at home. Anything that allows my partner some peace from whatever turmoil is going on in her brain is worth trying. We can't stop this awful disease and we'll never get our loved ones back but any peace we can bring them is a plus. I might add that the psychiatrist is very responsive. I have always gotten an answer from her within 24 hours.

I hope this helps. Let me know how it goes.


GraysonJames
Posted: Saturday, January 29, 2022 6:06 PM
Joined: 1/29/2022
Posts: 3


Hi, I just joined today. Unfortunately, I’m not seeing much for people like myself that have dementia. I’m looking for support because I was diagnosed in 2019 after seeking help in 2018. I didn’t find cognitive behavioral therapy helpful. I’m in mild to moderate stage at 46 years old. I’m a gay man and married to a man that is familiar with dementia and Alzheimer’s patients through his work at numerous nursing homes and hospitals. Sadly, that bedside manner does not apply to me. I must make arrangements on my own. I live below poverty level due to being disabled. The disease and finances have ripped my marriage apart. I feel like I see things differently than before. As if I can see the true intentions or feelings of others when they may not show it. I know it’s delusional thinking and I need help to stop this behavior and the intrusive thoughts. I experience hallucinations and memories that are not mine, and not real. I think I have a pretty good handle on those because I’m still aware that it’s not real, but that’s getting confusing. My husband has moved to another room in our home and I remain in our bedroom. I rarely leave my bedroom. He no longer communicates with me other than letting me know food is ready. The hardest part is seeing him resent me. We are on the path to divorce. Things between us may not get better, it may end. Either way, I need help. I’m hoping to learn and find ways to make things better or at least learn techniques to cope and manage without it taking full control and ruining my life. I apologize for my rambling, grammar or jumbling. It takes me a significant amount of time to put a sentence together and then I question whether it makes sense. A lit of times it dies not. If you have any advice, please feel free to share. I’ll take any help to get back to the positive and happy person I used to be. Thanks for reading.
B C H
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2022 12:14 PM
Joined: 1/30/2022
Posts: 1


I'm new, too.  I'm Barbara, just checking in to say "Hi".  My straight friend of over 50 years just left the neurologist's office yesterday with a report that was not surprising, but it was distressing.  
Seeing the report in writing was a kind of wake-up call.  We're both in our mid to late 70s.  I've always been independent and self-sufficient, and she has always depended on a husband (divorced, though, for 15+years).  I think need to look at my feelings about that.

Jo C.
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2022 1:48 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 12882


Dear Grayson-James, while I am so sorry for what is happening, I am so glad you have found this place and hope that it can lead to some much needed assistance.

First of all, the Alzheimer's Association has a 24 Hour Helpline that can be reached at, (800) 272-3900.  If you call, ask to be transferred to a Care Consultant.   There are no fees for this service and you can call as much as you wish or need to; no problem and it is all about support.  The Consultants are kindly supportive, have much information and can often assist us with our problem solving.  It is a good place to go and be heard.

While you have some very real concerns about your condition and your relationship with your husband, it also seems you need to be given information regarding helpful entities in your geographic area which may be able to be of assistance to you.

You have much insight into your behaviors and what you are feeling and experiencing; that is good. 

Have you seen a dementia specialist such as a good Neurologist who can accurately diagnosis just which type of dementia you have?  That is greatly important.  There are multiple different types of dementia of which Alzheimer's is only one.  This becomes important as medications for one type of dementia may be contraindicated in another and even possibly make things worse.   Having a specialist as part of your healthcare team would be important.

Some types of dementia have more of a risk of experiencing hallucinations and delusions and in some, there are medications that can be of help.

It is important to know that while this LGBT Forum is here, it is not as well attended; please feel completely free to Post on any and all Forums here on AlzConnected; all are welcome.  We have gay individuals who are active on the Spousal and Caregiver Forums as those are the best attended Forums and they are always welcomed with open arms; that would also include you too if you wish.

Sending warm thoughts your way,

J.


Jo C.
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2022 1:51 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 12882


Just a quick note to let the new Members know that they are "lost" in someone elses Thread and may not be seen.  

To set your own independent Thread which may be seen much easier, go to the Green Prompt at the top of the page that says, "Add Topic."  Click on that; add your title and then type your Post in the box provided.  You will get more independent responses that way.

J.


Jo C.
Posted: Sunday, January 30, 2022 2:02 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 12882


Hello Barbara and welcome.  I am sorry to hear about your dear friend; that must have been a stunning shock to hear.   She is blessed to have such a caring friend.  It is true, when hearing such a diagnosis regarding someone we care about, it takes time and some thinking to absorb and understand where we are with all of it and what it means.

As mentioned above, if you wish to speak about this with someone, the Alzheimer's Assn. has a 24 Hour Helpline that can be reached at (800) 272-3900.  If you call, ask to be transferred to a Care Consultant.  There are no fees for this service. Consultants are highly educated Social Workers who specialize in dementia and family dynamics.  They are easy to talk to, are kindly supportive, have much information and can assist with problem solving.

You are also very welcome to Post on any and all of the Forums in addition to this one.  We have multple gay Members who do just that and you will find much more feedback on the Caregiver and Spousal Forums even if you are NOT a caregiver or spouse; it is open to all and all are welcomed with open arms.  Those Forums are the ones that are better attended and likely to give more feedback.

Will look for you there and hope you get some of the support and feedback that will be helpful to you.

J.


Camoruso
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2022 9:01 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Welcome GraysonJames! I'm sorry for your diagnosis but glad you found your way here. There are many supportive people on these forums. I have learnex a lot by reading posts on the different forums.

My partner was diagnosed in 2017 although we saw signs a few years before that. I still get frustrated, angry, scared and yes, resentful. Those feelings are not meant for my partner but for this disease. Unfortunately, this disease also affects the people who love the the PWD. I hope you and your partner can find a way to talk about how you both feel.

I agree with Jo C. that you should contact your local Alzheimer Assoc. They can direct you to resources in your area. I also stumbled upon an Office of Senior Affairs in our city which offers things that I didn't even think we would need.  It also was hard for me to accept help but I'm doing better at that. One step at a time, one day at a time!


GraysonJames
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2022 10:28 PM
Joined: 1/29/2022
Posts: 3


Thanks for your reply Jo C. I’ve seen two neurologist when diagnosed with refractory epilepsy and it was the brain scans that pointed them in the direction of mixed dementia, including vascular dementia and another that I can’t remember. It took nearly three years of ongoing appointments to get that diagnosis but only after I was in cognitive behavioral therapy. The Neuropsychologist did all the tests that they do and found several areas of decline that indicate possible dementia. Oh, the other suspected type is LBD. That just popped in my head. Anyway, upon the direction of this neuropsychologist I went to another neurologist that is more versed in my type of epilepsy as well as Alz and dementia. After a few examination appointments it became clear to her that it was a dementia. She ordered a stay in the NMU (Neurological Monitoring Unit). At the time I did have really good insurance as I was working as a claims adjustment examiner for one of the largest health insurance companies. I was already on short term disability through that employer and decided to go for it. MRI’s, CT, PET were all ordered as I waited for a spot in one of the six beds. The idea was to address my epilepsy as well as the dementia and white matter lesions and active TIA and CVA. Unfortunately Covid hit and those plans were put on hold. Short term disability was about to run out, but the NMU had just reopened and I was pushed ahead of others to get a space while I still had insurance. Sadly, the required pre authorization kept getting denied for the week stay and eventually only approved for two night stay. However that preauthorization came the day after my short term disability had ended and thus my employment terminated. No longer had insurance to go forward. Since, I have started Medicaid but that comes with so many hurdles and finding a specialist is very difficult if not impossible. I’ve become a shut-in and use telemedicine with my primary only to get refills for anti epileptic drugs that don’t work. She has no knowledge or experience in these areas so she doesn’t treat me other than refilling meds that former Neurologist have prescribed. I really don’t know much about it or any treatment I should be on. I have been told to just make all arrangements while I still can but that I’d just have to live day to day from here on out. I’m guess the concern hit me the hardest realizing that I will soon be completely on my own when my husband leaves. I suppose that’s what drove me to look for support groups. It seems especially hard to find support being a 46 year ild gay man in East Texas. Just knowing that there are people, such as on this site, that can share with me helps a great deal. Thank you.
GraysonJames
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2022 10:36 PM
Joined: 1/29/2022
Posts: 3


Thanks Camoruso! Being new here I feel a bit overwhelmed, but I’ll try to maneuver my way through the site and get a better feel for it. I have been looking into local resources but haven’t had any luck. I live in rural East Texas and the hate for LGBTQ+ is still quite strong here even in the fields that are supposed to offer support and assistance. The last thing I want to do is go back in the closet trying to get support or any resource. Being diagnosed agoraphobic with severe panic episodes and bipolar is another barrier for me that I’m trying to get past. I appreciate the suggestion from you and Jo C. Thank you!
Jo C.
Posted: Tuesday, February 1, 2022 5:23 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 12882


Hello again GraysonJames.   There is much on your plate; the added stress can make symptoms feel heightened or become more florid.   I initially did not realize the multiplicity of diagnoses you were having to deal with.  Coupled with the marital issues which you mention may lead to divorce, that is an overwhelming amount of stress and may make changes in how your body and mind are responding. 

From what you have written, I wonder if you would be best served having a good Psychatrist that sees dementia patients within his/her practice, or perhaps a Geriatric Psychiatrist to be the primary point in managing care.  Even though you are in your mid 40's, you have biplar disorder, recently diagnosed dementia, panic disorder, and more.  This must be so difficult for you and it would be best to not have too many prescribers for the conditions and to have access to a specialist that can deal with both the dementia and the BPD and panic dynamics  .  Geriatric Psychiatrists have a good grounding in managing dementia and dual diagnoses, so it may be a plus to begin to look into that to gain information.   You will know best what is going to be a good fit for you.

You mention living in East Texas; I am not certain in which of the cities.  That being said, it would be a significant benefit if you could begin to build your support system.  Family; friends, etc. if that is available to you. AND . . . . there are churches that are LGBTQ based.  If you Google this, you will find them in a variety of areas in East Texas.   One that comes to mind are the Metropolitan Churches; there are several of them in East Texas.  They are all over the U.S.; we have one in a community not far from where I live.  I do know these churches have a very strong support system and take their Members seriously for support and often have Social Workers to assist with the LGBTQ issues as well as for those in need of services.  Perhaps you may find the beginning of a new support system in such a place.  May well be worth trying.

Also, do not forget the 800 number for the Helpline that is listed above; they are there to listen and support as well as helping to provide information regarding helping entities.

Getting that support system started may be a good support for you as you move through the months ahead and dealing with all the challenges you mention facing; it is good to be cared about and to be able to return the caring.

J.

 


IrishKtMae
Posted: Monday, February 7, 2022 11:32 AM
Joined: 2/7/2022
Posts: 1


Hello,

My name is Kate and I am new to the "alz connected" LGBTQ forum/message board.  I am grateful to have found it and find others in similar care giving and living situations as me and my wife.

We've been together for 30 years this month and married for 11 years.  She is in early stages of dementia but some days it seems like it is progressing faster than others.  I am blessed that she is still alert and able to do most things and her memory loss is with the short term.

I appreciated you sharing your journey about your wife in your introduction.  I hope you are able to find the support and connections you need for yourself.  It seems that is one of the more challenging parts of caring for our beloved mate is finding balance in our own life for getting out for relaxation, support and fun.

Kind regards,

Kate Ridge


Camoruso
Posted: Monday, February 7, 2022 11:43 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Welcome Kate! I'm sorry to hear about your partner but glad you found this forum. I've learned a lot by reading the posts in the spouse section. It's helped me be prepared for things to come. I prepare for the future but I am trying to also make something of the present. Easier said than done! Best wishes, Carla.
Kathy100
Posted: Monday, February 14, 2022 9:22 AM
Joined: 2/14/2022
Posts: 3


Hi.  Just joined and looking for support. My wife has been having memory issues for about the past year.  After all the testing they know she has Moderate Cognitive Impairment.  But they don’t know why. The Neurologist said he has never seen results like hers.  She is unable to work now.  And I feel like I am seeing some behavioral and personality changes over the past couple of weeks.  Just looking for support as we navigate this journey.
NickyB
Posted: Monday, February 14, 2022 6:16 PM
Joined: 1/5/2022
Posts: 3


Hi Kate,    I am in a similar situation. 

My wife has been diagnosed with Alzheimers. 

Lately her symptoms have very rapidly become worse. 

I believe she is in the late stage now , at least by 

how the  illness is manifesting itself.

We have been together almost 40 yrs.

She is 22 yrs older than I. 

The neurologist has tried Donepezil

 but the side effects were too much.

She has been for about 2 to 3 months 

experiencing hallucinations.

No family for support 

and her family is not very lesbian friendly.

It certainly is tough...but I will 

keep her home 

with me if I can for the duration.

Feel  to e mail me at lightpoint54@gmail.com 


Camoruso
Posted: Monday, February 14, 2022 11:13 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Hi Kathy100, you've come to the right place for support. It seems they always call it mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the beginning. How old is your wife? My wife was under 60 when we received the same diagnosis from a Neuro Psychologist.  He didn't want to call it Alzheimers until they had an MRI and saw a Neurologist. My wife stopped working in 2015 and diagnosis finally came in 2017. She is in stage 6 now. Due to hallucinations and aggressive agitation we now see a geriatric psychiatrist. She prescribed an anti-psychotic called Olanzapine. We had tried Quetiapine first but she was getting too dizzy and then refused to take it. If it wasn't for the meds I'm not sure what I would have done.

I have my wife in a senior care center 2 days/week. Right now that is my only respite. No family in the area and friends tend to disappear as things progress. 

I read a lot of posts on the spouse/caregiver forum. It's a great place to learn and prepare for the future. I wish you the best and offer you whatever knowledge I've gained so far.


Kathy100
Posted: Tuesday, February 15, 2022 7:35 PM
Joined: 2/14/2022
Posts: 3


Hi Camoruso.  I’m still trying to learn and navigate this site so I know when someone responds.  My wife will be 60 in a few weeks.  She has some good days when she seems like her old self again.  And then we have some bad days.  I feel like I am starting to see some personality changes, but I don’t know if that is depression or whatever else is happening.  She has been unable to work since the end of September. She just has very little in terms of short term memory.  And she really struggles to process things.  She has gotten lost a couple times even in our neighborhood. Right now the only plan seems to be to wait and re test her in November and see if there is progression.  She is taking Donepezil. They aren’t sure if it will help, but they said it can’t hurt.
Camoruso
Posted: Tuesday, February 15, 2022 11:35 PM
Joined: 1/16/2020
Posts: 29


Hi Kathy100, most of the docs seem slow to want to say it's Alzheimers/Dementia. We did see a Neurologist at one point but for us it was a waste of time. He talked to my wife for 5 minutes before bringing me in. He then told my wife she was fine because she made it to her appointment. That was the dumbest thing I ever heard. You might want to look at the 7 stages of alzheimers and see where your wife might fit in based on your observations. Sometimes they exhibit signs from 2 stages. They also may not hit everything in a stage. It might help give you a reference point when talking to doctors.

I was concerned about my wife getting lost. One of the hardest things I had to do was take away driving privileges. I also got her an ID bracelet just in case.

I don't think this site give notifications. I try to check it daily to see what's new. I sent you an invite to connect with me. I think then you can directly message someone once connected (like a friend request).

 


Kathy100
Posted: Wednesday, February 16, 2022 7:06 PM
Joined: 2/14/2022
Posts: 3


I do like the Neurologist that she sees.  He spends as much time talking with me as he does with her and he is good about asking for my input.  So I feel lucky in that respect.  

We did NOT like the Neuropsychologist who interpreted her Cognitive testing and said at least 3 times “of course we never know for sure until after death.”


BubbieAllyn
Posted: Monday, March 14, 2022 9:07 AM
Joined: 3/13/2022
Posts: 1


From what I can figure, your gender queer status isn’t an issue here unless it’s an issue in your relationship with your mother. You are in the same leaky boat as the rest of us. Our feet are wet, the band is too loud and we’re scared. 

My granddaughter has announced she’s queer and while I want her to be happy, I don’t want to know any more than I know about my traditionally married grandchildren. As a child of the ‘60s queer seems a pejorative that upsets me more than their relationships. 

Find a social life that supports your stresses and know you are 

Not 

Alone 


ChristaInSeattle
Posted: Monday, April 4, 2022 8:51 PM
Joined: 4/4/2022
Posts: 1


My Dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s last year. He and my Mom are still living independently, though the definition of that changes as time goes on.

I’m lesbian. My wife of 20 years and I are very involved with our family and taking care of my parents. We’ve found a lot of information at he University of Washington’s Brain Health Center, where Dad was diagnosed.  

Dad acknowledges he has Alzheimer’s, but doesn’t accept the day to day realities of it. The challenge we face is that Dad dismisses concerns, blames it on other things, etc. You can’t logic your way into him having a deeper acceptance. I know I have to make peace with him not understanding what’s happening. 


Phoenix1966
Posted: Monday, April 4, 2022 11:43 PM
Joined: 10/20/2021
Posts: 26


ChristianSeattle, it sounds like your dad has anosognosia. It is a condition where the person can not perceive their illness correctly. They are not being stubborn or are in denial; their brain cannot process that their thoughts and beliefs don’t mesh with reality. 

I found it one of the toughest symptoms I had to deal with when caring for my PWD. 


Work in Progress
Posted: Monday, April 25, 2022 5:01 PM
Joined: 4/25/2022
Posts: 1


Hi all!

Gay man in his Fifties living in rural South, and sole

caregiver of elderly mother with (some sort of) dementia.

Going on about 8 years into her steady decline and it's 

reached that point where the larger issues are all now impacted

and things are getting very challenging, quickly.

Between geographic, emotional, and cultural isolation, I've 

been having trouble coping with all of it. Hoping to find support

from others who 'get' being on the outside. Peace!


Nvart
Posted: Thursday, May 26, 2022 8:43 PM
Joined: 5/26/2022
Posts: 4


I'm a bi cis woman, taking care of two parents with dementia. My siblings and I share duties, each staying with them a couple days a week. My brother is gay, and my sister was a lesbian but now is in the closet and homophobic. My mom was diagnosed around 2015, my father a couple of years later.

I lived for thirty years in big cities and now live in the suburbs. I keep telling myself, "I know why I moved away from here when I was 18." There are just no queer people around. And I find with my brother that we only really have time to talk about my parents care. I wish I had queer caregiver friends...

 My sister is having neurological issues -- it seems over the past ten to fifteen years, since she's gone back into the closet, that she has regressed emotionally. Seems her executive function is degrading, and she is constantly losing her phone and her keys. I am currently getting more help from hired caregivers on the days she is with my parents. She is seeing a neurologist and I've asked to talk to him after she has her next round of testing. I'm worried about her.

I'm the youngest child and also the most organized/on top of things, and have become the manager of the family. Before I moved back here I got my parents legal and financial forms in order and became POA. My brother helps a lot, and my sister is helpful too, in her own way. I'm grateful for many things about our situation, but sometimes it seems uniquely challenging, and when I think of my future, that I may be taking care of my parents and sister for what seems like forever, I really despair, get depressed.

My dating life seems over--I just don't know when I would have time. It's even hard to make friends. Especially during these times. I moved 8 months before the pandemic...

Thanks for reading/listening...

 


kenneth08
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2022 8:30 AM
Joined: 6/23/2022
Posts: 2


Hello dear. It's a pity to hear that. I want to ask you first how you feel. Are you all right? You are a strong person who continues to take care of your mother. I wish you both happiness and health