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Iron Metabolism
Myriam
Posted: Monday, February 6, 2012 3:30 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


From Alzheimer's Daily News:


(Source: Alzheimer Research Forum) - Mutations in tau fan the flames of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other tauopathies. What is tau doing that gets it mixed up in so many neurodegenerative conditions?

Could the answer lie not in the tangles that besmirch the brains of affected individuals, but in tau's failure to perform a newly discovered role: promoting iron export? Ashley Bush and colleagues at the University of Melbourne in Australia report that without tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) is unable to reach neurons' surfaces, where it is needed to work the bellows that pump excess iron out of the cell. Mice missing tau develop symptoms akin to the Parkinson's-dementia complex that afflicts many people with PD, Bush said. A gentle chelator that sops up the extra iron cures them, suggesting a potential route to treat not only Parkinson's, but also Alzheimer's and other conditions, Bush claims.

The paper "adds to the evidence that iron accumulation, which continues into old age, may be part of the 'age' component of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, PD, and HD, and also why men (who have higher brain iron levels than women) may get these diseases earlier than women," wrote George Bartzokis.

Returning iron levels to normal, Bush thinks, should be therapeutic. Prana Biotechnology Limited in Parkville, Australia, has tested a second-generation clioquinol-like compound called PBT2 in Alzheimer's, and is starting a Huntington's trial. In addition, Rogers warned that researchers developing therapies targeted at APP or tau might want to monitor effects on iron metabolism.

Go to full story: http://www.alzforum.org 


Lisa428
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2012 9:30 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


Myriam,

 

Wow, thanks for sharing.

 

Peace and Hope,

Lisa


Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, February 9, 2012 2:24 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18248


Yes, Myriam, thanks for sharing. 

I never heard of alzforum.org before. 

Iris L.