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Juicing cannabis leaves restores thinking
alz+
Posted: Tuesday, July 1, 2014 6:23 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


MM is offensive to some people. There was perhaps an unintended implication my posts suggested ALZ.org endorsed medical marijuana use. It does not. 

  

Have been juicing leaves for about 6 weeks, more energy, better brain function, walking normally. Doctor from Mendocino California has reports on on how to juice leaves and results if you are interested. 

 

This has helped me more than any other single thing and sorry daily diary my experience was removed, leaving this blank, but I am starting it over. 

 

August 8, 2014 added info (thanks to people who question benefits and caution against adverse effects)

 

Below is excerpt from article from Alternet.com which suggests some conditions unfavorable to juicing leaves.

  http://www.alternet.org/personal-health/juicing-raw-cannabis-miracle-health-cure-some-its-proponents-believe-it-be?pagingff&current_page=1#bookmark

 

"Raw cannabis does not provide acute symptom relief, Courtney acknowledges, although “some effects can be immediate.” One patient at the Humboldt Patient Resource Center in Northern California reported immediate relief from severe nausea after drinking juiced cannabis. 


Some effects, according to Courtney, “take three days to be appreciated. Others build for weeks. Full clinical benefit may take four to eight weeks to take effect. It takes that long for plant (phyto) cannabinoids to fully saturate the body’s adipose (fat) tissue. Phytocannabinoids are stored in the adipose tissue, as are the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E & K.”


Courtney cautions people with kidney or gallbladder problems that raw cannabis might pose a risk. He would not recommend it for a patient with Hypercalciuria, type II, Enteric Hyperoxaluria, or Primary hyperoxaluria. 


Also, Courtney notes, anyone on prescribed medications that can be blocked by grapefruit or pomegranate juice should advise their doctor if they are considering a raw cannabis regimen. Ditto those who are taking blood-thinning drugs such as Coumadin. Most leafy greens contain high amounts of Vitamin K, which can prevent the liver from metabolizing such drugs. and raw cannabis might, too."

  

The article goes on to suggest one would have to juice a huge amount to have any positive effect, however we are juicing 5 to 8 leaves a day and there is a definite change for the better in both my healthy husband and me with Alzheimer's, migraines, fatigue, and bone pain.

 

 love and courage
 

 


 

 

 


alz+
Posted: Thursday, July 10, 2014 7:44 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608



http://www.cannabisinternational.org/info/alzheimer-Mol-Pharm.pdf

 

Not sure if this link works, but when I got to the CONCLUSION part - left me speechless.

 

"

Conclusion
We have demonstrated that THC competitively inhibits
AChE and, furthermore, binds to the AChE PAS and
diminishes Aaggregation. In contrast to previous studies
aimed at utilizing cannabinoids in Alzheimer’s disease
therapy our results provide a mechanism whereby the
THC molecule can directly impact Alzheimer’s disease
pathology. We note that while THC provides an interesting
Alzheimer’s disease drug lead, it is a psychoactive compound
with strong affinity for endogenous cannabinoid receptors.
It is noteworthy that THC is a considerably more effective
inhibitor of AChE-induced Adeposition than the approved
drugs for Alzheimer’s disease treatment, donepezil and
tacrine, which reduced Aaggregation by only 22% and 7%,
respectively, at twice the concentration used in our studies.
7
Therefore, AChE inhibitors such as THC and its analogues
may provide an improved therapeutic for Alzheimer’s
disease, augmenting acetylcholine levels by preventing
neurotransmitter degradation and reducing A
aggregation,thereby simultaneously treating both the symptoms and
progression of Alzheimer’s disease."
 
I hope one day to find postings from people using MM, raw leaf in juice, or edible, or vaporized, or the oil. It seems 1000s of people are using MM to help themselves or as caregivers with tremendous success. Although I live in a Legal state, there is still no direct access without overwhelming complications.
love to all

 


jfkoc
Posted: Thursday, July 10, 2014 10:31 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 21127


I am surprised. So what is posted here infers endorsement by the Alz Assoc? People took offense? Medical use of Marijuana is being used mainstream for certain health issues and being researched for others. It is legal in over 1/2 our states.

Let this site always be open for information.....please.


Sea Field
Posted: Thursday, July 10, 2014 10:59 AM
Joined: 8/5/2012
Posts: 1872


Cannabis (marijuana) is simply a substance, a plant.  Like most medicinal plants, it can be used in a beneficial way, or in a harmful way.  The same can be said for many things.  Like alcohol, pain relievers, food, ...

 

If cannabis is potentially helpful, I want to hear about it.  

 

Thanks for reposting on this topic.   

 


alz+
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 6:07 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Juicing fresh leaves continues to provide cognitive improvement.

My walking and appearance seem to have changed to a normal gait. I am still slow - but attribute that to lack of exercise for so many months.

 

Again, this is based on a Mendocino Ca MD who has videos and reports I think the link is in first or second post. Use a regular blender, yoghurt, berries banana and leaves. Most days 4 leaves, doing one drink a day.

 

I realize symptoms increase and decrease but this comeback is really strange and I can only attribute it to the fresh leaf as food supplement.

 

I also noticed what may have been a liver cleanse for the first week. No psychoactive component. Some growers use leaves, many throw them out!.

 

Have close friend in California with health problems who is a MM user and tossed his leaves, now drinking a smoothie every day and his general health and stamina have increased.

 

Adding the lemon balm leaves is VERY MELLOW. Seems fresh leaf is like difference between organic and non organic foods, anyone else try this and report cognitive improvement or lack of one. Very interested in this.

love and courage


alz+
Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 11:52 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Juicing leaves is coincidental to having best brain functioning in a year, from this I assume one is benefiting the other.

 so not much else to say about this except I am very grateful we tried this and that I am not paying hundreds of dollars for pharmaceuticals with bad side effects.

 

 Love and courage


Jo C.
Posted: Saturday, July 26, 2014 11:24 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 13472


NOTE:   The Alzheimer Assn. Administrator will NEVER edit or delete a post without contacting the Member.  

 

If you did not receive such a contact, then the Administrator of the Message Board did NOT delete your writing.

 

Also, the only person who can edit or delete messages other than the Administrator is the Member who wrote the post themselves.

 

There is no way for other Members to edit or delete another person's post.

 

So, either the posting Member accidentally deleted the post or there was some sort of a computer glitch.  (I usually think of those glitches as electronic gremlins.)

 

Did you receive any contact from Administration telling you they were going to delete the thread you are speaking of?

 

 


Myriam
Posted: Saturday, July 26, 2014 8:05 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Iris, I think there is another way that a post can be deleted and that is if a family member or other person monitors the postings of a alzconnected member and decides to delete the post...assuming they have access to the passwords or the alzconnected member leaves the Message Board logged in.
Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, July 26, 2014 11:04 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18354


Myriam, I believe that was Alz+ who questioned a possible deletion of a post.  I had not posted on this thread.

Iris L.

Myriam
Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 12:20 AM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Oooops! '@^@||| dizzy
Jo C.
Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 7:55 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 13472


Alz+, I am going to be honest as well as a bit bold here . . . . you mention the use of marijuana as having, "no bad side effects," but for you it may well have.

 

It has been noted by psychiatry in valid studies that marijuana use can cause or contribute to rapid cycling in Bipolar Disorder.  You have BPD, so that makes it a valid risk for you and you recently had a very significant break that nearly, (per your writing), had you admitted to an inpatient psych facility as well as moving toward divorce.  That was not the first time, again; per your writing.

 

During that time period, it was evident from the way you communicated on the Message Board, that you were in trouble and some of us were very concerned on your behalf. 

 

Also . . . the danger to yourself is increased because, (also per your writing), you do not share your use of marijuana with your psychiatrist, etc., because by divulging that information it could get you removed from the program that is the provider for your care.

 

This then, leaves your psychiatrist and other mental health providers working in the dark, trying their valiant best to adjust their treatment care plans and therapy completely unaware of that which may be contributing to a cycle of increased BPD symptoms.

 

Think about it.

 

It is also noticeable, that when you proselytize marijuana use to other members on various different forums for use in their compromised Loved Ones, it is not given with advice for them to first seek the input of the Loved One's physician to determine whether or not the use of marijuana may be contraindicated secondary to other medical conditions or contraindicated secondary to other medically necessary medications in use that may have negative effects when combined with marijuana.

 

Not all caregivers will have common sense about this, so it would be best to dispense that caveat when encouraging the use of marijuana so as to avoid possible negative outcome.  Think heart disease, lung disease, allergies, mental health issues, etc.

 

Prescription medication is not evil nor the cause of all that is dreadful.  Some people's lives and quality of life depend upon it.

 

There may be a positive for some people to be able to use both treatment approaches, but it should not be done without common sense, caution, and wisdom from the caregiver in concert with the healthcare providers having full knowledge and with their oversight.  There is too much to lose in not being wise and cautious.

 

One must always remember that medical adage; "First, do no harm."

 

 

Johanna


Lane Simonian
Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 9:55 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5138


Almost no medication is without risk.  This ranges from everything from anti-psychotic medications to medicinal marijuana.  My issue with people in the medical profession is that they constantly seem to assume that the medications they prescribe or advocate have less risk than herbs and supplements whereas the reverse is more often the case. 


 

That does not mean that herbs should be taken willy nilly or that they are always without negative side effects.  However, there are chemical reasons why medicinal marijuana may help for Alzheimer's disease.  And some of the compounds are non-psychotropic such as cannabidiol. 


 

http://medicalmarijuana.com/medical-marijuana-news/title.cfm?artId=552 


 

Cannibidiol was alone found to be ineffective for the treatment of bipolar disorder but it also was found to have no side-effects. 


 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18801823 


 

And cannibidiol may offer a relatively effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease. 


 


 

 2009 Winter;15(1):65-75. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-5949.2008.00065.x.

Cannabidiol: a promising drug for neurodegenerative disorders?

Abstract

Neurodegenerative diseases represent, nowadays, one of the main causes of death in the industrialized country. They are characterized by a loss of neurons in particular regions of the nervous system. It is believed that this nerve cell loss underlies the subsequent decline in cognitive and motor function that patients experience in these diseases. A range of mutant genes and environmental toxins have been implicated in the cause of neurodegenerative disorders but the mechanism remains largely unknown. At present, inflammation, a common denominator among the diverse list of neurodegenerative diseases, has been implicated as a critical mechanism that is responsible for the progressive nature of neurodegeneration. Since, at present, there are few therapies for the wide range of neurodegenerative diseases, scientists are still in search of new therapeutic approaches to the problem. An early contribution of neuroprotective and antiinflammatory strategies for these disorders seems particularly desirable because isolated treatments cannot be effective. In this contest, marijuana derivatives have attracted special interest, although these compounds have always raised several practical and ethical problems for their potential abuse. Nevertheless, among Cannabis compounds, cannabidiol (CBD), which lacks any unwanted psychotropic effect, may represent a very promising agent with the highest prospect for therapeutic use.

 

 

So yes people have to act with due diligence.  Ironically, the main problem with certain herbs in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease is their interaction with other medications.  Not all medications but many of the medications prescribed for Alzheimer's disease are hitting the wrong targets.  The same cannot be said for the most effective herbs. 


 


 


 


 


Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 10:52 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18354


I have not commented before on threads having to do with mm.  Johanna states studies have found that mj causes rapid cycling in bipolar patients.  Lane states studies show no side effects in bipolar patients.  So there is controversy regarding this issue.  


Johanna's point is that recently Alz+ has gone through a mania and was very out of control  She is on psychotropic medications, but has not disclosed the use of mm to her prescribing psychiatrist.  


Johanna  is pointing out that ALL possible contributing factors to bipolar cycling be evaluated.  This is a rational idea.

Iris L.




alz+
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 4:04 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Johanna seems to have a definite view of cannabis, perhaps as a street drug, and she  follows her own sense about it. That is free choice in action.
 

  

Claiming I "PROSELYTIZE for MM" is unfair, in my opinion.
 

  

 I provide information no one else offers on boards about an herbal medicine that works, which might help caregivers get sleep and patients get peace. It is legal in many states. The US government NIH documents its many benefits, specifically for Alzheimer's agitation and slowing the progress of the illness. Israel uses it in hospitals as well as many other countries. We are not discussing street drugs, pushers, or stoners.
 

  

This I know is true for me: it helps. It does not CAUSE manic attacks in me or any other person I have ever known and I have been around people who use cannabis for 45 years and people with mental illnesses my whole life. I am not posing as a doctor or pushing my ideas on anyone, as far as I know. Surely there are teenagers or very disturbed people who do all kinds of drugs and have bad results and people with mental illnesses need to be mindful. Knowing so many people through groups, I trust them and respect their right to live their best lives just like an Alzheimer patient.
 

  

On boards I have stated always go to a dispensary, start low and slow, that one must find a strain that helps them, to get advice, research those who have experience with it and so on. One gets advice from people who know what they are talking about, not people who have no knowledge of Cannabis as medicine or equate it with Meth and Crack. 

  

I happen to trust people will use information rationally and nothing I write is going to make someone go out and commit crimes or abuse a patient.  

  

Even in a legal state telling a physician one uses MM will have unfortunate consequences. Many people with mental illness go off prescribed drugs because of the harmful side effects (diabetes, convulsions, withdrawals, addictions and tardive dyskinesia to name a very few) and use MM to control symptoms. I would guess hundreds of thousands have found it more helpful and less dangerous than Seroquel or other drugs that left me permanently damaged. MM is not a panacea and to use it does not prevent me from using the drugs my doctor prescribes when they benefit me.
 

 

My relationship with my psychiatrist is really no ones business, is it? Even if people who respond with advice do it out of their concern for my well being I would hope it not be so personal, feels invasive.  

  

If people have had bad experience with MM then I hope they post about that.
 

  

I appreciate the opportunity to provide information links and personal experiences and hope some have benefited. To post against MM on the Topic of Juicing Leaves which has NO PSYCHOACTIVE element but has allowed me to go to exercise class, clean up, sleep better etc is perhaps beyond an offering of concerned guidance but an attempt to silence the discussion. 

   

 Iris - I have been notified by email when my posts have been edited or removed, only on this subject, as someone apparently finds it a problem and reports them. I would prefer to write a blog but can not manage that, so thank you to ALZ.ORG for allowing this discussion to happen. But yes the Juicing posts were removed - this Topic went blank when I came back to it. I started writing new posts here and they have not been removed, yet.
 Now that I am OUT as an ALZ patient though, I suppose one must consider I deleted it all by mistake. You never know.

   

 love and courage
 

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 4:33 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5138


I am glad that we have a board where we can have these kinds of discussions. I know several people on and off these boards who take an herbal approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and they all have a great deal of knowledge.  They adjust as necessary and find the right doses and combinations for their bodies.   


 

For some conditions there may be no other alternatives to synthetic medicines, but Alzheimer's disease is not one of them.  The best chemicals for cognition and behavior come from plants.   


Forget-me-not
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 6:43 PM

Thank you, ALZ+ and Lane, for the information and links you supply.

 


Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 6:55 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Forget-me-not. i read your profile and do hope that you ad your husband search for the best diagnostic center in your area. There are things other than dementia that can cause the symptoms that you describe. These need to be checked. 

There are also many, many types of dementia. Meds that are good for one type may be contra-indicated for another.

And a good neurologist, as part of his discussion with you, should be checking the validity of each drug as necessary for your doctor. As my neurologist said to me: As far as I am concerned, the fewer the drugs, the better.


Forget-me-not
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 7:19 PM
Mimi S. wrote:

Hi Forget-me-not. i read your profile and do hope that you ad your husband search for the best diagnostic center in your area. There are things other than dementia that can cause the symptoms that you describe. These need to be checked. 

There are also many, many types of dementia. Meds that are good for one type may be contra-indicated for another.

And a good neurologist, as part of his discussion with you, should be checking the validity of each drug as necessary for your doctor. As my neurologist said to me: As far as I am concerned, the fewer the drugs, the better.

I am sorry, I have not updated my profile in ages.

 DH was diagnosed in April at an Alzheimer and Dementia Center of a well known university after two days of assessments by a geriatrician, a cognitive and behavioral neurologist, a social worker, history taking, MRI and extensive blood work. There are also a psychologist and a neuropsychologist on staff. DH is seen at their clinic every three months. The clinic coordinates care with his primary physician.

We will address the issue of MM on his next appointment.



Iris L.
Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 7:58 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18354


Alz+. I'm sorry your thread was deleted.  As I said before, I have not been following this thread, so I don't know what was discussed.  I only got involved now because my name was brought up by mistake.

I believe ANY topic could be brought up and discussed unless the discussion becomes vitriolic.  Where else can we discuss what concerns us regarding the many aspects of dementia?
 


 

Everyone should be able to comment, because everyone has an opinion.   I'm not for censorship. 

 

Members need to be mindful that we are discussing our OPINIONs, and not medical advice.  We get medical advice from our medical professionals. 


 

Iris L. 


 


 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 10:33 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5138


This is a case where the angel may be in the details.  Whereas high levels of THC in street marijuana may be bad for memory and mood (at least in people who are not cognitively impaired), high levels of cannabidiol in medicinal marijuana appear to have the opposite effect. 


 

Claims are sometimes made that the cannabis plant can reverse certain symptoms of dementia. There is no rigorous scientific evidence behind these claims nor does Dementia News endorse the use of cannabis as a treatment for dementia symptoms.

To quote Dr Tim Karl from Neuroscience Research Australia 

“We have noticed that most of the components of cannabis can actually worsen your cognitive performance and have behavioural side effects”.

Dr Karl is leading research trials to determine detrimental and beneficial properties of cannabis and its compounds in brain disorders. One of his current research projects is looking into a specific compound called Cannabidiol, Dementia News asked him to tell us more.

“Previous international research and our own review of the literature a few years ago showed us that cannabidiol (a specific component of the cannabis plant; not associated with the hallucinogenic effects) seems to not have any of these negative effects and could in fact be beneficial for brain cells, so we decided to test this cannabinoid in an animal model.”

Cannabidiol has also been suggested to have neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties in previous studies. More specifically, in earlier research, cannabidiol has been shown to target the endocannabinoid system, which contain a group of receptors in the brain that are involved in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain sensation, mood and memory.

 

When cannabidiol was added to brain cells grown in test tubes (in vitro), its use was found to reduce amyloid beta production and subsequent cell death.

Dr Karl, his research team and colleagues at the Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, found that treatment in mice with cannabidiol was shown to reduce the severity of some of the behavioural symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease. This result was published in the Journal Psychopharmacology.

 

In the Australian study, mice with Alzheimer’s disease were given a daily injection of cannabidiol for three weeks. After being put through a variety of memory performance tests, the mice with Alzheimer’s disease, given the cannabidiol treatment, were shown to have better social and object recognition skills over the course of the treatment compared to the mice with Alzheimer’s disease who were not receiving the treatment. The researchers also assessed potential treatment side effects and did not observe fear or anxiety related behaviours associated with the use of cannabidiol.

 

Dr Karl and his research team are still undertaking research with this specific compound and the next step is to examine the brains of the mice from this current trial, he told Dementia News:

“We are not yet at a stage where we can consider testing this compound in human clinical trials, but we will keep working on it. Like many studies, we have an interesting finding that may or may not turn out to be clinically important.”


jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 10:34 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 21127


All of our Drs want a complete list of the meds we take ....every visit...and they want to know about alcohol use as well. I think it would not be in my interest to omit anything. 

I assumed, erroneously, that medical marijuana had to have a prescription. That would be the "medical" in MM.

 

So would someone please clarify...can one just go a get MM and if so is it not then a street drug


Myriam
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 12:18 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


There are 20 or so states that have legalized medical marijuana, including California. In Washington State, each clinic/dispensary has a medical physician whom, after an examination, will prescribe MM. With that prescription, you can purchase MM in that clinic/dispensary or go to another to have the prescription filled. I have an appointment this afternoon at a clinic that I chose after googleing "best medical marijuana clinics in Seattle". 

 

Iris, below is a website for the clinics/dispensaries in Los Angeles: 

  

http://listing.canorml.org/medical-marijuana-collectives-in-california/ 

 

jfkoc, this is a website for the medical marijuana clinics in Chicago: 

 

http://ilmmj.com/dispensaries/chicago/ 


Sea Field
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 12:51 PM
Joined: 8/5/2012
Posts: 1872


Wisconsin has not legalized MM but has passed a bill allowing Cannabidiol (CBD) to be used as a treatment for seizure disorders.   They expect this treatment option to become available this fall.

 

The bill was written narrowly to apply only to CBD, which must be administered by a physician and is not considered by advocates to be “medical marijuana.”

 

http://journaltimes.com/news/local/governor-signs-bill-allowing-use-of-marijuana-component-for-health/article_1a2931b2-c5c4-11e3-928e-001a4bcf887a.html 


jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 1:07 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 21127


Thanks for the further info.
alz+
Posted: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 8:59 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Sea Field wrote:

Wisconsin has not legalized MM but has passed a bill allowing Cannabidiol (CBD) to be used as a treatment for seizure disorders.   They expect this treatment option to become available this fall. 

  

The bill was written narrowly to apply only to CBD, which must be administered by a physician and is not considered by advocates to be “medical marijuana.” 

 

http://journaltimes.com/news/local/governor-signs-bill-allowing-use-of-marijuana-component-for-health/article_1a2931b2-c5c4-11e3-928e-001a4bcf887a.html 

Minnesota has legalized MM for patients with specific illnesses. Because it is legal does  not mean people who are Against Marijuana/Cannabis will be forced to use it. So people who feel strongly against it can relax.

In regard to GETTING PRESCRIPTION or informing a doctor one uses MM, in an ideal world of course it would be wonderful to be able to educate a doctor that this non Pharmaceutical helps (only military physicians as far as I have ever heard) will tell a patient to use it and work with the patient on its affects with other prescriptions.

Doctors in the USA are mostly part of corporate medicine under thumb of Big Insurance. Even in legal states, there are very few (I know of none) medical doctors who prescribe and they are subject to all kinds of harassment. In the case of mental illness one can have their life turned upside down because a zealot reports the patient who uses MM for anxiety to some other authority to protect themselves. Being LEGAL does not prevent the patient from enduring job loss, being cut off from doctor, having uninformed family members interfere and worse.

 

This is why people go to dispensaries where a physician who has chosen to help the people no one else can help works daily, takes information, follows what helps and what to be cautious about.

 I do not owe anyone, not even my physician, every bit of information from my life.

 

This has been a couple months or more of using the juiced leaves. I have not lost any weight but my walking is still better than before I started, I have had days in a row of feeling really good - days when I forget I have the illness. I have been staying off boards to enjoy my summer as a person, not a person with Alzheimer's. I have taken a break from counseling, and my last visit with psychiatrist is next week due to budget cuts to low income residents.

 

Using anything in excess can be harmful. I believe people in desperate situations, as I was when first diagnosed, should be able to find their best help since my Internist has nothing to offer. No one should be forced to use Aricept or Namenda or patches, and for now we are not. Many people ca not afford these drugs anyway. It took 25years for doctors to acknowledge acupuncture. They do not prescribe it, or massage.

 

Because MM is being legalized is not an endorsement of cartels, children using marijuana for recreation, or a stoner drop out lifestyle.

I am not repeating that again.

 

But if one is caught in the anxiety of a dementia illness, the daily, hourly oppression of fear of the future, and using this old herb helps them - then I support their choice, and I support as well as those who prefer a different path.

 

Enjoying my summer! love and courage to ALL



jackalar
Posted: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 5:53 PM
Joined: 11/25/2013
Posts: 29


I really appreciate this discussion. Thank you ALZ+ and Lane for the information and links!

 

My husband was diagnosed with AD this spring.  He has a recommendation from a dispensary physician for medical cannabis and now awaits state approval and the official “card.”  

  

My husband’s internist does not prescribe cannabis (few doctors in this state do). Yet he is aware of the plan and stated: “I have no problem with that.”  

  

We are in our early 60s. Other than trying it in our early 20s, we have not been recreational users.    

 

My husband is on no prescription drugs.  He is following a protocol of various supplements, aromatherapy, exercise, diet, and other natural practices. I have researched medical cannabis and feel it could be a helpful addition to his regime. Especially since we live in a (medically) legal state, it’s definitely worth trying. 
 

I will report back when he gets started.    

 


jackalar
Posted: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 5:55 PM
Joined: 11/25/2013
Posts: 29


Oops... I have to learn how to format posts!
Myriam
Posted: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 9:58 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


jackalar, I would be very interested in the results for your husband. Next week, I'll be getting my medical mj card. But first, I have to find and provide medical records indicating I have AD.
jackalar
Posted: Wednesday, August 6, 2014 10:27 PM
Joined: 11/25/2013
Posts: 29


Myriam, my husband had to submit a copy of his medical records to verify his condition, also. 

 

I will keep you updated.  We can compare notes!

 

Best wishes Myriam.

 

~ Jackie



llee08032
Posted: Friday, August 8, 2014 7:13 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


I hope at this point we mutually and respectfully agree to disagree. There is an upside and a downside, pro's and con's and a plethora of research on marijuana and MM that points to both negative effects and positive effects that can be hurled back and forth at each other for years to come. There are very strong and passionate opinions and different belief systems. There is no need to be attacking, biting, angry and beating one another over the head with your opinion. What works for some may not work for others. Take what you need from the board and what works for you and leave the rest. 

 

Everyone here is on the same ship sailing toward the same destination and you need to support each other and respect each others differences. Especially, in a world where someday what makes us different and unique may no longer be a part of our person or exist. 


Congratulate and be happy for the success of others and be open to possibilities. There is too much to chance and such a long journey and we never know what could lead to positive outcomes, a cure or someday maybe even have a positive impact on yourself. 
Let's pull it together and celebrate our differences and uniqueness!

alz+
Posted: Friday, August 8, 2014 9:04 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


jfkoc wrote:

 

 

All of our Drs want a complete list of the meds we take ....every visit...and they want to know about alcohol use as well. I think it would not be in my interest to omit anything. 

 

I assumed, erroneously, that medical marijuana had to have a prescription. That would be the "medical" in MM.

 

So would someone please clarify...can one just go a get MM and if so is it not then a street drug

Good question on what is the difference.

 Cannabis has been a widely used herbal medicine for 1000 years andconsidered a Street Drug if you purchase it from a friend or dealer for relaxation or whatever in a state that enforces the Federal Law against it.

 

MM is cannabis grown under regulated clean safe conditions with no pesticides or harmful additives and sold through dispensaries which are also regulated and generally have a physician who does an intake and may recommend a form (edible, sublingual, vaporized). In my state it is legal but dispensaries are denied permits so it is grown by patients or their caregivers and provided to members of Compassion Clubs for various illnesses once they have a MM patient card.


A prescription and dispensary assures quality (no mold or additives), labeled by the strain, (Indica or Sativa dominant), in a safe place and

the chance of ingesting something toxic is eliminated along with the threat of being arrested.  Growers today are sophisticated botanists and chemists, and capitalists. The plant has potential for many new medicines.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090401181217.htm

I personally want to support safe production as I have 2 close relatives with MS who benefit from Cannabis but live in non legal states, along with another relative who suffers from epilepsy, and a friend with cancer.

 

Hope this helps understand the difference.



alz+
Posted: Tuesday, August 19, 2014 1:11 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Update - august 2014:

 

I am able to stay out of bed during day time for 2 weeks. Cleaned a bedroom that was filled with stuff TO GO but never went. Took me 2 weeks to complete, but the big word there is COMPLETE. My son came to visit, I was able to walk around for several hours each day, got to visit my 94 year old Mom because I could ride in a car for 3 hours each way. I did sleep 10 - 12 hours each night but feel ready to start strengthening my body.

 

Is this all from Cannabis? I can't prove it, but feel less...INERTIA. I was able to follow conversation at lunch with my Mom and 4 others. There are moments when I feel unsure again, forget words a lot, but am really doing better than when I took Aricept.

 

Thank you to those who have sent me private messages regarding your success with Cannabis! It is sometimes hard to suggest its benefits based just on me. Really terrific feeling when you tell me your personal stories.

Thank you all.

 

Love and Courage


Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, August 19, 2014 1:17 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5138


Bravo!
alz+
Posted: Thursday, August 28, 2014 9:03 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


 At my brightest i could not understand the workings of the chemistry of  Lane's posts on the scavnger effect but it seems to me we ought to, as people with a diagnosis, be willing to try alternative remedies asap to preserve our lives. 

 I had forgotten about my aromatherapy oils until I read Lane's older posts today and will get back on the rosemary and lavender oils. 

  

I put drops of the oils on a cotton ball and put the cotton ball in a small 3" glass bottle with a screw cap. I leave it bedside and at my favorite chair and simply unscrew the cap and inhale. 

I forgot because it worked. I had a chronic cough for years that came on with exercise and tried lots of medical solutions, none of them worked, no one understood what it was. had been "diagnosed" with COPD, asthma, chronic bronchitis etc. One month inhaling eucalyptus, lavender and rosemary and the cough was gone...and forgotten. 

  

Since I suspect ALZ is caused by a virus it now makes sense on a non scientific level that THC (anti viral properties) and essential oils (anti bacterial and anti viral properties) can change the pattern of my illness. 

  

This was in my mail box this morning: 

  

  

  

   

 Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Marijuana May Be a Treatment for Alzheimer's disease


 
 
A new preclinical study indicates that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease. 

Alzheimer's Reading Room

Marijuana May 

THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) is the active ingrient in marijuana that produces a psychoactive reaction. THC is a naturally occurring chemical substance in the marijuana plant.

Cancer patients have used marijuana medicinally to find relief from the pain, nausea, and loss of appetite that can be caused by cancer treatments.
Marijuana compound may offer treatment for Alzheimer's disease 
New preclinical study indicates THC may slow or halt progression of memory-robbing disease 
  • Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. 
  • Researchers from the USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute showed that extremely low doses of THC reduce the production of amyloid beta, found in a soluble form in most aging brains, and prevent abnormal accumulation of this protein -- a process considered one of the pathological hallmarks evident early in the memory-robbing disease.  
  • These low concentrations of THC also selectively enhanced mitochondrial function, which is needed to help supply energy, transmit signals, and maintain a healthy brain. 
"THC is known to be a potent antioxidant with neuroprotective properties, but this is the first report that the compound directly affects Alzheimer's pathology by decreasing amyloid beta levels, inhibiting its aggregation, and enhancing mitochondrial function," said study lead author Chuanhai Cao, PhD and a neuroscientist at the Byrd Alzheimer's Institute and the USF College of Pharmacy.
"Decreased levels of amyloid beta means less aggregation, which may protect against the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Since THC is a natural and relatively safe amyloid inhibitor, THC or its analogs may help us develop an effective treatment in the future."
  • The researchers point out that at the low doses studied, the therapeutic benefits of THC appear to prevail over the associated risks of THC toxicity and memory impairment. 
Neel Nabar, a study co-author and MD/PhD candidate, recognized the rapidly changing political climate surrounding the debate over medical marijuana.
"While we are still far from a consensus, this study indicates that THC and THC-related compounds may be of therapeutic value in Alzheimer's disease," Nabar said. "Are we advocating that people use illicit drugs to prevent the disease? No. It's important to keep in mind that just because a drug may be effective doesn't mean it can be safely used by anyone. However, these findings may lead to the development of related compounds that are safe, legal, and useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease."
  • The body's own system of cannabinoid receptors interacts with naturally-occurring cannabinoid molecules, and these molecules function similarly to the THC isolated from the cannabis (marijuana) plant. 
Dr. Cao's laboratory at the Byrd Alzheimer's Institute is currently investigating the effects of a drug cocktail that includes THC, caffeine as well as other natural compounds in a cellular model of Alzheimer's disease, and will advance to a genetically-engineered mouse model of Alzheimer's shortly.
"The dose and target population are critically important for any drug, so careful monitoring and control of drug levels in the blood and system are very important for therapeutic use, especially for a compound such as THC," Dr. Cao said.

alz+
Posted: Tuesday, September 2, 2014 11:32 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


September, still off dementia pharmaceuticals and using juiced cannabis leaves.

Dreaming has increased and I am remembering dreams again.

Blood pressure down 15 points.

 

I was given a low THC MM bud through compassion club member to try, felt incredibly calm and was able to do some icky basement cleaning  A FIRST IN A YEAR.

 

Current self treatment for EOAD post 4 years (estimate longer than that)

 

aromatherapy - small glass jar with screw on cap and cotton ball inside, put drops on cotton ball so not opening and closing essential oil bottles every day. Lavender, Rosemary, Bergamot

 

ADDED coconut oil to juiced drink

 

Lemon Balm capsules before sleep

 

Exercise (now keeping up with Silver Sneakers class)

 

Zoloft 25 mg a day   Ativan as needed

 

Feeling hopeful even with end of summer at hand.