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Life Ends Before It's Over
JLawson
Posted: Saturday, September 6, 2014 2:38 PM
Joined: 9/6/2014
Posts: 5


I wanted to share this song I wrote with the community here. I'm a year out of high school, and recently my family had to move my grandmother, who has Alzheimer's, to a home where she could be better cared for. Having watched her go from being the grandmother she was before, to the heartbreaking situation where she needs more than we can give, there was only one way a person like me could express all I was feeling; through a song. The words came tumbling out one night as I was thinking about all this. I've gone through so many emotions through all of this, and music was the only way I could appropriately express them all. I posted the song a few days ago for family and friends to hear, and since I participated in a walk today, I thought that many of you might be able to relate more. So, my song, entitled "Life Ends Before It's Over", is posted here: https://soundcloud.com/jdog612/life-ends-before-its-over The lyrics are posted with it, for the poetic aspect of them.

I hope you enjoy... of everything I've written, this song means the most to me.


Memorykeeperformom
Posted: Saturday, September 6, 2014 8:02 PM
Joined: 8/15/2014
Posts: 17


JLawson, Thank you for the song that you wrote, I think your you are a amazing young man, It is hard to see our loved ones forget who they are. and also  hard to see them regress. Keep writing and singing I know your Grandma would like that.

 

Peace


Because she's my mom!
Posted: Saturday, September 6, 2014 10:48 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 737


Thank you for sharing your beautiful song. It's incredible.
JLawson
Posted: Sunday, September 7, 2014 1:18 AM
Joined: 9/6/2014
Posts: 5


Thank you both for your kind words. It means a lot to me. I believe that every victim would love and appreciate everything we all do if they were still themselves. Music is the least I can do. Thank you truly again.
Jim Broede
Posted: Thursday, September 11, 2014 4:32 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


 

 

Unfortunately, life is over for too many. Even for some without Alzheimer’s. For those who choose not to fall in love. With life. --Jim

 


TessC
Posted: Monday, October 6, 2014 4:48 PM
Joined: 4/1/2014
Posts: 5190


I'm glad I came over to Musings to listen to your song that your grandmother inspired. The lyrics are powerful. Best to you always and to your grandmother.
JLawson
Posted: Wednesday, October 8, 2014 4:08 PM
Joined: 9/6/2014
Posts: 5


Thank you much for listening.

Jim, this is true. Life is not being lived when one does nothing but work. That said, life ends in a different, stronger, more permanent way for sufferers of Alzheimer's. Anyone else can choose to start living their life differently. But for those with Alzheimer's, that's it. Life is abruptly over. And it's not even like a terminal illness, where the patient might be able to choose to do this or that on their bucket list in the time they have left, no... with Alzheimer's, you're unable to really live before you've even died. When you go of old age, you may not be able to do much, but you're still you. Alzheimer's even takes that away.


Luise F.
Posted: Tuesday, November 4, 2014 3:18 PM
Joined: 11/4/2014
Posts: 5


Thank you for sharing your beautiful song.  I just joined this group today and so happy that I did.  We all struggle everyday caring for our loved ones and seeing them leave you before they're gone.  My mom has been suffering with Alzheimers for 14 years now and it's such a terrible and heartbreaking disease.  Your words ring so true.  Much love and happiness to you and your family.  Keep up with your creativeness.
JLawson
Posted: Thursday, November 6, 2014 7:24 PM
Joined: 9/6/2014
Posts: 5


Thanks Luise, I will. It's hard to remain optimistic sometimes but even if they're not fully there, we must enjoy and appreciate the time we have/had. Much love and strength to you too.
Jim Broede
Posted: Thursday, November 6, 2014 10:30 PM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


 

 

My friend Ron has Alzheimer’s, JLawson.  In advanced stage. He’s 86. And sometimes, I wonder if he would be better off dead. But not always. Because I, and others, interact with Ron. One-on-one. We bring him pleasure. By taking his arm. And strolling. In the great outdoors. Other times, I push his wheelchair. For miles and miles. Along a paved trail. In an idyllic woods. I talk to Ron. And describe what we are seeing. Ron is sensing pleasure. Later, he won’t remember any of it. But for a few minutes, Ron is genuinely alive. Feeling pleasure. Ron was a brilliant scientist. Not so brilliant any more. But still, he experiences moments of calm and tranquility. I talk to Ron in a soothing voice. Touching his shoulder. Ron feels the good vibes. Knows I’m his friend. Everyone with Alzheimer’s can be reached. Even the deaf and blind lady in a nursing home. Sobbing. Sobbing. I touch her shoulder. That’s all she needs. Reassurance. Knowing that she isn't alone.  --Jim

 


Jim Broede
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 11:01 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


 

Many with dementia retain musical abilities. Right up to the end. Has anyone noticed?  Amazing, isn’t it? They burst into song. Even play the piano. Though they can’t carry on a conversation.  Maybe it’s a form of spiritual expression. A way of conversing. With the spirits.  In a meaningful way. Sends a shiver of delight. Up and down my spine. --Jim


JLawson
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 2:57 PM
Joined: 9/6/2014
Posts: 5


Your friend Ron sounds like a wonderful person, Jim. What you do with/for him is truly wonderful. You are right that there are indeed other ways to communicate that they understand better than spoken language. Just a happy moment, or a song. And those moments can indeed be what keeps their life from ending.

 

I have noticed that they retain musical abilities too. Though, I don't know if my grandmother plays piano much anymore. She didn't play much even when she lived with us, not that long ago, but that ability didn't seem to be fading. But from other people, I have heard the same as what you are saying. I have performed some songs at the home where my grandmother is staying, and while I didn't see much visible reaction (which is what I expected), it still seemed worth it, you know? I will never know what it meant to them, but I do know it's something they understood. Just one of the many reasons I love music.