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Genetic component to EOAD?
hope716
Posted: Sunday, September 28, 2014 10:21 AM
Joined: 9/28/2014
Posts: 4


Hi all,

 

My mom has been recently diagnosed with Early Onset AD.  She is 64.  She has been symptomatic for probably the last 3 1/2 or 4 years.  But we were attributing it to stress, anxiety, etc.  She is adopted, so we have no family history. I am scared beyond belief for my mom and also for my sister and myself and our children. I had no idea until now that AD could have a genetic component or that it could occur this young in otherwise healthy individuals.  Does anyone have any experience or information regarding the genetics of the disease?  I know this is not the caregivers board, and appreciate any insight or feedback you could all share.  We are obviously completely devastated.

 

Thank you in advance for your time.

 

 


Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, September 28, 2014 2:00 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18520


Hello, Hope.  I can't give you a detailed answer today.  But I can tell you that yes, there is a genetic component to Alzheimer's disease.  Some genes will definitely cause a person to develop Alzheimer's, usually in the younger ages, before age 65.  The other genes increase the possiblity of AD in the usual years, after age 65.  What you can do as prevention is to reduce the risk factors for AD as much as you can.  That's what I am doing, because I have a gene for increased risk myself.

Iris L.

Lisa428
Posted: Sunday, September 28, 2014 3:25 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


Hi Hope17,

 

Welcome to Alzconnected Message Boards.  I'm sorry to hear about your Mom.  I was diagnosed @53.

 

I do carry one of the ALZ genes but not the younger-onset gene.  That usually runs in families.  Although I do have Younger-Onset AD.

 

You may want to post on the Caregivers board to get more information.

 

I know you all are very upset and scared. You are NOT alone.  We are here.

 

Please, try calling the toll free 24/7 Helpline @800-272-3900.  You may want to ask to speak with a Care Consultant.

 

You can also go to Alz.org.  It is full of wonderful information.

 

Good Luck.  Take Care.  Please, post as much as you can.  We will all be here to help you.

 

Peace and Hope,

Lisa

 

 


hope716
Posted: Sunday, September 28, 2014 8:28 PM
Joined: 9/28/2014
Posts: 4


Thank you so much for your responses.  I feel like we sort of categorized in the middle of everything.  Some of the literature I read delineates early vs. late onset at age 60, others 65.  I think my mom's symptoms became apparent around the age of 61.  And at that point, it was still sketchy because of the stress, anxiety component.  She was just retiring that year from teaching...and had taught a brand new grade for the first time in 30 years during her last school year. Quite a feat for someone who was having the onset of dementia.

 

We are following up with the local neurologist (with whom I have little faith) tomorrow and she has an appointment at the Cleveland Clinic on Friday.  I want to thank everyone on this board who shares their experiences.  There is life after a diagnosis and you all give me a lot of hope.

 

All my best.


Lisa428
Posted: Sunday, September 28, 2014 9:20 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


Dear Hope,

Good Luck with your Mom's first neurologist appointment.  Remember, this is NOT the only neurologist in town.  If you are not satisfied with him/her please call your local AD Assn to get assistance in finding another one.

 

The second appointment sounds better. Please find someone who specializes in diagnosing and treatment AD/other dementias.

 

I saw three neurologists and even went out of town to a Memory clinic.  I knew something was wrong but I did not believe it was EOAD/Younger-onset AD.

 

Please, try to be calm.  Write down any questions you may have to ask the doctor.

 

Please, keep us posted.

 

We are here!

 

Peace and Hope,

Lisa


Iris L.
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 12:33 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18520


Hope, depression/anxiety can mimic dementia.  Your mom needs a thorough evaluation by a neurologist who regularly diagnoses and treats the dementias.  Google pseudodementia.

Iris L.

Lisa428
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 7:42 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


Hope,

 

How did today's appointment go??

 

I've been thinking of you and your Mom all day.

 

Please, let us know.

 

Peace and Hope,

Lisa