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My recent neurologist visit
Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 12:36 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


I visited my neurologist two days ago. The following is a report of that visit, in no particular order of significance.

My MRI of two months ago showed mild generalized atrophy. This is a new finding for me.

The NeuroTrax computerized cognitive testing showed that I was below average for my age in the area of executive function and attention, but above average in memory and some other functions.

This test did not take into account my extensive educational background, so I am lumped in with all adults my age, regardless of educational level. In determining cognitive decline, it is important to note the decline from the patient's highest educational attainment.

My secondary insurance company sent me a denial letter for this test, saying it is for educational purposes, and there is no medical necessity. The neurologist suggested that I appeal this decision.

The neurologist wants me to begin to take resveratrol, in the dosage of 500 mg twice a day. He cited a study in which resveratrol in high doses reduced inflammation in patients with leukoariosis.

He wants me to participate in a clinical trial in which I could get the FDG-PET scan without charge. When I called the study coordinator, she told me the trial was for seniors age 70-80 with a dx of MCI. She will get back to me to see if I could be included at my age or if there are other trials I could be eligible for.

I am to continue Exelon patch and Namenda XR at the same dosages.

He said he does not believe I have Alzheimer's disease, because my progress has been slow, but he would like the information from the FDG-PET scan. He believes my cognitive impairments are related to inflammatory and vascular risk factors of systemic lupus, hypertension, diabetes, and sleep apnea. He wants me to focus on control in these areas.

He also suggested low dose (81 mg) aspirin a day.

He also suggested that statins reduce inflammation and reduce progression. So far, I have resisted statins. Although my cholesterol is within normal limits now, he is thinking of statins for the anti-inflammatory properties versus the cholesterol lowering properties.

Overall, things are status quo. I am awaiting information about the clinical trial and the FDG-PET scan.

I will look into the resveratrol and get some.

That's it for now.

Iris L.




llee08032
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 7:18 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Iris,

How much did the Neuro Tax cost? Do you feel it was worth taking given that your educational level was not a factor in determining level of impairment? There was something with atrophy (white or grey matter?) in my MRI also but I was told it is normal for the aging brain. I think Dr's need to be more clear about the criterion for the study's they recommend. How do you feel about how the appt went and what he said about the inflammatory and vascular risk factors?

Mimi S.
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:52 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


I seem to have gone for a testing to a guy who is out of the ordinary.

He feels that one's initial IQ or whatever other measurement including making a guess from education attained or employment must be considered. And Iris, because of where you went to school, you have a pretty good idea of you initial cognitive level.

It makes a huge difference in figuring out how much of a decline there has been.

Example, suppose your IQ is at the 99th percentile. And you test out at the 45th percentile in a test. This is a huge loss! However, if preclinical level is not taken into consideration, a 5% loss is not significant.

Re how long you've had it. I had the same declaration from a local guy who teaches dementia in the local medical college."I did not have AD because I've been diagnosed more than 5 years and still am in Early Stage." I was upset by his conclusion because he had never seen any of my test results. I happen to be acquainted with a big shot in AD Research, so I wrote him. His answer: Alzheimer's takes the time it takes.

Is mild atrophy appropriate for your age?

No comment on the resveratrol. I've been talking the low dose aspirin and statins for years on advice of internist closely associated with my neuro. Everything I've read says that heart health is important. The internist has been very proactive in caring for me. And my current health shows the results.

Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 12:25 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


Good point, Ilee and Mimi.

I do not know the total cost of the NeuroTrax test because Medicare did pay a portion of the charge. My insurance is denying paying $292.

I asked the doctor if the NeuroTrax scores were like an I.Q. score. He did not respond. My Global Cognitive Score was 102. If that is my current IQ, that is a significant drop from ~150, where I was in my early adult years.

Here are my scores:
Memory 112
Executive Function 90
Attention 87
Information Processing Speed 108
Visual Spatial 105
Verbal Function 108
Motor Skills 109

He wants to use this as a method of monitoring going forth into the future. There are other tests, such as the Montreal test, which monitor executive functions more than memory. But this is the one he chose.

Doctors like to have objective data to measure. But the results of this test do not tell me how I am functioning every day, or how to manage my life better.

It's like the MRI. So, now I have generalized atrophy. So what? Does this make a difference? Apparently not. Perhaps it is normal for my age. I will have to research further. But why should I have to do this research as a patient?

The rheumatologist told me that my cognitive impairments are due to the micro-clots from anti-phospholipid syndrome, which was more active in the early years of my illness. It is related to lupus, and could be confirmed by the hyperintensities seen on my MRI. At the same time, another doctor told me that the hyperintensities were due to elevated blood pressure. In any case, what I have to do is avoid the anti-phospholipids, and avoid elevated blood pressure.

The treatment for lupus includes having an anti-inflammatory diet and anti-inflammatory lifestyle, so I have been doing that for decades. Now I have to incorporate a low carbohydrate diet in order to protect against diabetes, and monitor saturated fats, to monitory against heart disease. I am not afraid of healthy eating. I can do this.

The difference about vascular dementia is that it is potentially controllable with lifestyle measures, such as the diet and exercise to control cardiovascular disease and diabetes. I think it is working. But we cannot be sure, because I am also responding to Exelon patch, which I have been told only helps those with Alzheimer's disease.

So do I have a vascular problem or Alzheimer's disease? I don't know. The neurologist doesn't know. I am going to keep on doing what I am doing. So far, everything is working.

I think a lot of attention is paid, rightly, to diagnosis. But we also must pay attention to how we will live. I do not want to sit around, just waiting for dementia to overcome me. I want to live a fulfilling life, right now! And I want to be strong enough physically and medically to enjoy my life. I do not want to be sickly.

I am happy that my neurologist is focused on testing and searching, but I wish I had a doctor that was interested in how I am doing every day. Ideally, that would be my PCP, but my PCP is not interested. So, I make do.

Iris L.



TheSteven
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 1:25 PM
Joined: 10/11/2014
Posts: 167


Hi Iris L,

I am sorry to hear about your doctor's lack of help. Given your early stages, a PET scan may not help doctor's diagnosis anything anyways. I had two PET scans in three years and although they both showed hypoglycemia in both fronto temporal and cerebellar regions they couldn't make a diagnosis. It may have represented frontotemporal lobar generation or something else. Later, the MRI's lack of brain size and neuropsych evals indicated Alzheimer's. So at your stage, I wouldn't worry much about not getting a PET scan IMHO.


From your writings I have read the past couple months I knew you were extremely intelligent but I didn't know how much until now. I commend you on wanting to enjoy a fulfilling life. That's why I didn't want to wait for a doctor to help me either since they have no incentive to do so.


If you read my blog you probably know that mercury amalgams also causes lupus as well as Alzheimer's and numerous other neurological diseases and some to the alternative treatments to combat inflammation is much the same - DHA and EPA fish oils, Vitamin D and Vitamin E. I don't know if you've browsed this link for Alternative Lupus treatments http://www.mollysfund.org/2013/03/alternative-lupus-treatments-and-therapies/ but I think those listed including the acupuncture treatments would help as they have with me.


Mimi S.
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 7:04 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Iris,
Do google that test. Too much information for me to delve through.

Physician gets a copy of report. You should also.

Are those raw scores? These have no meaning to me. Obviously they are not percentiles which are the most meaningful.

Attention is your lowest score. I have no idea what it means.

I doubt they are like an IQ score. That comes from being tested on many, many different parts of one's intellect. These are individual tests.

The Montreal Test is a 20 minute sampling of one's cognitive ability. It obviously tests a few more functions than the 45 minute miii-mental, but is still just a screening test.

How long did you spend taking this test? The more abilities tested the better picture one gets of what's going on.

Again, I guess I'm going to an exceptional neuro. He is most interested in how I'm doing day to day.

Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:25 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


Thanks for responding, Steven. I did not say my neurologist was not helpful. Indeed, he has been very helpful, because he was the one who prescribed the Exelon patch that has helped me so much, and he was the one who prescribed PositScience, which also helped me a great deal.

I became diagnosed with systemic lupus and began treatment in the early 1990s. After many years, I am in remission. I have followed an anti-inflammatory diet and lifestyle since that time.

I do not have mercury amalgams. All have been removed.

Mimi, you're right, your doctor is exceptional. Actually, my neurologist allows me to stay with him only because the PCP refused to refill the Exelon patch prescription. The neurologist told me that I did not have to come back to him any more, and that was about three years ago.

I am glad that he found a way to monitor my progress on the computer. That's fine. But that does not help me at home.

Iris L.

jess1992
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:51 PM
Joined: 10/11/2015
Posts: 32


I don't really understand all the medical technical stuff but the exelon patch helps you? I've been taking it for a week now so I can't tell if its helping
jess1992
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:52 PM
Joined: 10/11/2015
Posts: 32


I don't really understand all the medical technical stuff but the exelon patch helps you? I've been taking it for a week now so I can't tell if its helping
jess1992
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:52 PM
Joined: 10/11/2015
Posts: 32


I don't really understand all the medical technical stuff but the exelon patch helps you? I've been taking it for a week now so I can't tell if its helping
jess1992
Posted: Thursday, October 15, 2015 8:52 PM
Joined: 10/11/2015
Posts: 32


I don't really understand all the medical technical stuff but the exelon patch helps you? I've been taking it for a week now so I can't tell if its helping
llee08032
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 6:34 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Jess,

As I recall I started on the lowest dose of the Exelon patch and noticed a significant improvement by the 2nd or 3rd week. I was pleasantly surprised at how well the patch seemed to wake up my brain! Over the course of 8 months I was having allergic reactions to the patch. It worked so well I didn't tell the Dr until the rashes and burns became so severe that I could not stand it anymore. In between that time I had a terrible experience with Namenda also that landed me in the ER with severe ataxia and the worst headache of my life. I am happy for anyone who can tolerate the medications because they do work really well for many PWD (persons with dementia).

Jess, I hope the patch works well for you and am looking forward to hearing about how it is helping you.

TheSteven
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 11:16 AM
Joined: 10/11/2014
Posts: 167


Hi Iris,
I am glad to hear that you got your mercury amalgams removed and that you are on an anti inflammatory diet. My diet is also anti inflammatory but I still have a lot of detox to do otherwise the mercury will continue to do damage. I hope you did followed some detox protocols as well.

Unforgiven
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 12:09 PM
Joined: 1/28/2013
Posts: 2659


I used to roll my eyes at resveratrol pills, preferring to get mine from the natural source. But now that I don't like what even one glass of Merloy does to my sleep, I think I'll look into it, along with pomegranate extract.

I need to say that educational level achieved does not directly correlate with IQ, necessarily. Abraham Lincoln and Frank Lloyd Wright, just to name two, never went to college. I never finished, even though my high school admissions (IQ test) and SAT scores put me at 95th percentile or higher.

I have a friend whose second ex-father-in-law was a neurologist. He told her that everyone declines with age, but the higher you start out , the higher you end up. I imagine that applies to decline from disease process as well. If you know your IQ from younger days, that is the baseline, not whether you have your doctorate.

jess1992
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 2:29 PM
Joined: 10/11/2015
Posts: 32


I'm sorry you had those reactions llee I have only been on the patch about 8 days so I'm not noticing much I'm having headaches and tummy troubles like the aricept I guess I will just have to wait and see . I have been journaling everyday helps to see what I did for the day
Iris L.
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 3:44 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


Unforgiven wrote:
If you know your IQ from younger days, that is the baseline, not whether you have your doctorate.



I was tested at 154, from grade school. In fifth and sixth grade, I was an Intellectually Gifted Child. Yes, that's what they called us childen, IGC. Then I was in a special junior high program, SP for Special Progress, in which I skipped the eighth grade.

Then, after passing an entry exam, I was admitted to the Bronx High School of Science, the only specialized high school that accepted girls in those days. I have had eleven years of post-high school formal education. I'm not bragging, but I was smart from a young age. Now I feel that my intelligence is back to high school level.

Jess, I have been on Exelon patch and Namenda for almost six and a half years. I began to notice improvement in about two weeks at the initial dose of 4.6 mg, then after a month, I was increased to my current dose of 9.5 mg daily.

The Namenda was added about two months later. I had some side effects of insomnia and restlessness, but still noticed cognitive improvement.

Steven, I did not do any more detox. But the lupus is in remission now.

Ilee, did you try the Exelon tablets, if you had an allergic reaction to the patch?

Unforgiven, apparently I would have to drink wine all day in order to get 500 mg of resveratrol. I don't think I can drink that much.

I have not had a chance to research resveratrol, but perhaps I will have time this weekend.

Iris L.


Unforgiven
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 5:23 PM
Joined: 1/28/2013
Posts: 2659


Indeed you would. Same with the pomegranate juice. Some people might not see the problem in that, but you and I do. LOL
Iris L.
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 8:36 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


Iris L. wrote:


Unforgiven, apparently I would have to drink wine all day in order to get 500 mg of resveratrol. I don't think I can drink that much.



There was supposed to be a "" after that post.

Iris L.




Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Friday, October 16, 2015 8:47 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 4384


I once spoke to the scientist involved in the study. I think he said one would need to drink about 800 bottles of wine per day to get the same benefits. There is no bad reasons not to take it and some little evidence that it may help. I had ordered mine a few weeks ago. Nothing to lose.


jfkoc
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2015 8:00 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 21138


Exelon really helped my husband who was diagnosed with LBD. Is the reversatrol for inflammation?


llee08032
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2015 9:58 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


No Iris, the Dr did not recommend the Exelon tablets. I assumed if I had allergic response to the patch that I would to the pills also? It's something to discuss at my next appt.

It is true that persons can be highly intelligent w/o formal education. Education can increase one's IQ. IQ is culturally sensitive/significant. Persons can also educate themselves. I had an old uncle who did not go past the 3rd grade but he was obsessed with reading the dictionary for hours on end each and everyday. I was a straight 'A' student and in advanced reading/spelling classes. I used to be able to spell any word given the correct pronunciation. My step-father was illiterate and as a small child I read him the newspaper.

Today my spelling is atrocious even with simple words. I have word finding difficulties everyday but scored in the top percentile in verbal fluency on both neuro psych evals. There is a website where you can submit writing samples and it calculates the grade level of your writing. Last time I checked I was at associates degree level. I may be at high school level by now. I didn't have the opportunity to pursue higher education until I was in my early 30's. In addition to spending a lot of money I had to sacrifice time away from my family working full time while going to school. The time away from my family and kid's was the biggest sacrifice and family's don't get through that unscathed. It hurts at times to lose what you worked so hard for!




Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2015 10:23 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 4384


Also keep in mind that if you take a pill that really works and it cause a reaction sometimes you can take another pill to offset the reaction. It all depends on how bad you needed. I have already done that in the past. I also believe the pill may work different then the patch. I have reactions from any types of stick on items to my skin.


Mimi S.
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2015 10:47 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Llee,
What you wrote about IQ's is pretty much correct.

Since as a long time ago college teacher of Child Development, I was also involved in measuring IQ.

IQ means Intelligence Quotient. It's attempting to measure one's cognitive ability. Different tests measure some of the same and some different aspects of cognition. Each of the tests has good and bad points based o the use to be made of the score. An individual test, especially if combined with an observant tester's notes can be quite accurate. Group tests such as those given to a class as a whole are probably a rough guess.

And yes, cultural factors as well as language come into play. I have a favorite example from the old
Stanford-Binet Test. The child was asked to define Mars. Only the answer, Mars, was acceptable. The popular, at my time, candy bar was marked incorrect. We were told that the child should have realized he was in a testing situation and given the first example. An actual test, a child was given a list of things to give the common pair. Knife; her answer, blood. Incorrect. This little girl lived in a home filled with very serious domestic violence. It was a common occurrence for dad to chase mom around the park, knife in hand. Aha, but as the tester I had to follow the rules, but I certainly made appropriate comments in my written report.

And of course IQ is something we are born with; it has nothing to do with Education. This should be tested with Achievement tests. Unfortunately this is hard to do.

And yes, in a sense people with little education certainly may have very high IQs. What was meant in the original posting was the ability of a tester to guess at a preclinical cognitive level when no IQ is available, by the job the person held previously. And if the tester's opinion, based on actual conversation, says the person might have gone much higher, then the initial guess is just upped. It's only something, in my belief, a good tester uses to ascertain where a person was before the emory was affected.

And now that we are diagnosed, where we once were is immaterial. We are where we are. And we must be proactive in our use of meds, Best Practices and whatever else we feel helps to delay the progression of the disease

Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2015 2:48 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


llee08032 wrote:
Over the course of 8 months I was having allergic reactions to the patch. It worked so well I didn't tell the Dr until the rashes and burns became so severe that I could not stand it anymore.





Ilee, if the adverse reaction is due to the patch, the pill might be more tolerable.



The point about dementia is that it means a decline of one's highest level of achievement. There are many people who function perfectly well at my current level of functioning, but they have always been at that level. So they do not have dementia. In my case, there is a huge decline in functioning. This is how I knew there was a problem.

In fact, I am in the process of developing a new perspective. When I first began treatment with my rheumatologist for systemic lupus, he told me that he could not get me back to 100% functioning, but he could get me to 70% functioning. And that is what he did.

For many years, I functioned at ~70% of my prior functioning, and I did pretty well. I was able to get married and raise a teenager, travel overseas, take care for my home and finances, engage in activities, and interact comfortably with all types of people.

Then, in 2003 and again in 2007, I noticed declines. I was less able to function. My life came to a standstill. Now, I believe I am functioning at 40-50% of my highest functioning. Sometimes, less. I have been comparing myself to the 70% level of functioning. But I need to accept my current level of 40-50%. Then, I can move forward.

The point I was trying to make about the NeuroTrax report is that the neurologist was trying to reassure me that I still tested within the normal limits for my age. But I have never been at the normal limits for my age, I have always been way above normal. Now I am at the lowest level of normal in some areas for my age group. This is indeed quite a difference for me!

This type of report is what can allow many people to say that there is nothing wrong with us. If someone wants to accept that there is nothing wrong with him or her, then fine. But most of us know differently.

The challenge is to get other people to understand this. This is why we cannot function at our work. This is why we cannot manage our households or finances well. This is why most patients are not diagnosed until they are well into dementia, and medications are less likely to work, and there is not much that can be done except get them ready for a nursing home. We are not at that point, but we have to fight to be taken seriously.

I don't have the life I had, but my life can still be fulfilling and enjoyable. I just have to make accommodations and change my expectations. That is what I am going to do.

Iris L.

llee08032
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 10:02 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


There is biological intelligence also known as neural efficiency and psychometric intelligence, a measure of your IQ score. The IQ score is not a precise or perfect measurement of one's biological intelligence. A individuals intelligence quotient can change with education. Newer imaging studies even indicate physiological brain changes with certain learning and training regimens. A score may change not because of any real change in general intelligence but that different tests may be used which measure different areas of abilities . Some abilities such as fluid reasoning, verbal abilities and crystallized intelligence are more stable over time. Conversely, short term memory and cognitive processing speed are not stable over time.Also a factor in intelligence is how a person uses their intelligence. For example, how well do you plan when you approach a task? How well do you respond to a task that is not going well?


llee08032
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 10:10 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Actually, You Can Change Your IQ If You Work Hard Enough

www.businessinsider.com/actually-you-can-change-your...
Business Insider
Nov 29, 2011 - "Scores can change gradually or quickly, after as little as a few weeks of cognitive training, research shows. The increases are usually so ...

llee08032
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 10:49 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


IQ or EQ: Which One Is More Important? Intelligence

psychology.about.com › ... › Cognitive Psychology › Intelligence
Could EQ be even more important that IQ? ... Traditional Intelligence versus Emotional Intelligence ... Today, scores on most IQ tests are calculated by comparing the test taker's score to the scores of other people in the same age group.

llee08032
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 11:20 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


The point I was trying to make about the NeuroTrax report is that the neurologist was trying to reassure me that I still tested within the normal limits for my age. But I have never been at the normal limits for my age, I have always been way above normal. Now I am at the lowest level of normal in some areas for my age group. This is indeed quite a difference for me!

It is a huge difference Iris, and one that takes some getting used to! I've wondered if I can no longer do the work that I do now and perhaps don't meet the criterion for disability what I'll do with an under average IQ?

This is not relative to me but I'm thinking of the show Under Cover Boss. I've watched it a few times and was amused at how a boss with MBA from Havard could not perform a laborer's job.

Mimi S.
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 1:45 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


I haven’t seen the movie. The gentleman living next door to me is a carpenter. There is no way I could build the things he does. And so many laborers jobs call for skills, sometimes just physical, that we don’t have.

And I do believe Iris’s point is that when a neurologist is trying to assure her that she tests within normal range, he is not acknowledging what her preclinical was. I think she would like to have him acknowledge that.

Lee you are still employed. I don’t know if you have lost cognitive skills and how you are dealing with it.

I was formerly a teacher. Even if I could teach the material from my long term memory, I would no longer be able to keep my knowledge up to date. And horrors of horrors, I would not be able to remember the students names. Nor would I have the physical stamina to teach all day and then begin the to me, the necessary prep work and grading of papers necessary to teach the way I would want.

Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 7:21 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


The question is not how to measure intelligence and other aspects of cognition, but how to measure and monitor the decline in intelligence and other aspects of cognition for a specific person, not a group.

Ilee, disability is based on two points, as it was explained to me. The first point is the inability to perform your usual occupation. This is what private disability insurance policies may look at.

The second point is the inability to perform any occupation, more than sporadic chores. This is what Social Security Disability Insurance is based on.

All areas are taken into account--knowledge base and skills, physical stamina and strength, and overall capability of performing gainful employment. So, think about if you would be able to perform a minimum wage, unskilled labor job. If so, you are not considered to be disabled. If not, you are disabled. It is not a matter of what you know to do, but what you are medically not capable of doing.

The question that is asked on the disability forms is, Is the patient capable of being rehabilitated and retrained for another vocation? The doctor will be expected to provide an opinion. This is a serious question and should be thought about thoroughly before answering. Myriam used to advise consulting with an attorney.

You might begin to note where you notice the inability to perform your occupation. In what areas? This will help you know what to write in your application.

Mimi, you may not be able to perform at your prior level of teaching. But society has already given you an out. Society has said that at age 65, or thereabouts, a person can retire from her occupation, and is not required to work, but may receive a pension.

Many people who "retire" in their 50s and early 60s do so for medical or caregiving reasons, not because they don't want to work any more.

Iris L.



llee08032
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2015 10:48 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


I thought this was interesting in follow up to the discussion about IQ:


How Einstein's brain helps study intelligence and lifelong ...

sharpbrains.com/.../how-einsteins-brain-helps-study-intelligence-and-lifel...
Apr 20, 2015 - Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News. Icon ... How Einstein's brain helps study intelligence and lifelong neuroplasticity.



alz+
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2015 12:38 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


there is huge billboard along the highway with Einstein's photo and it reads "Einstein was no Einstein in school! Don't give up!"

Highly educated people and geniuses get dementia.

I heard a doctor Grayson talk on NPR People's Pharmacy yesterday about Resveratrol as anti inflammatory. He had about 25 herbs and supplements proven effective for all kinds of stuff to prolong life.

At end of program they said "This was a replay of an earlier interview with Dr Grayson who passed away unexpectedly last week."

Iris, how do you make emoticons? oh wait, I don't feel like learning anything new today. Yes I do want to learn how to make other faces.


alz+
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2015 12:46 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


doctor was named Mitchell Gaynor, not what I wrote above.

http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2015/10/22/show-990-diet-and-lifestyle-as-gene-therapy/

I have been craving beets, eating lots of beets, he said they help blood pressure. But had lots of anti inflammatory herbal info and what foods create inflammation (sugar, soda drinks, etc) and how probiotics help everything including cognition.

OK, time to walk dog.

Iris, your IQ is HUGE! Much of my intelligence I lost to distress and trauma.

There are some really bright people on this forum, so far everyone I've read seems very smart!


Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2015 12:48 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


On the old board we had access to many emoticons. Now we have fewer.

Smiley face
semi-colon plus right parenthesis : + )

Wink face
colon plus right parenthesis ; + )

Frown face
semi-colon plus left parenthesis : + (

Iris L.


Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2015 1:45 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18362


Ilee, I watched a PBS documentary on The Brain. One of the segments was about how taxi drivers in London must prepare to get a taxi license. They must memorize every street in London. They call this "the Knowledge". It takes at least two years for complete memorization, about the time of junior college education.

Studies show that their hippocampus, the area of the brain that is involved in memory, is enlarged over the average hippocampus. The drivers who had been driving the longest had the largest hippocampus.

I have questions.

Is the hippocampus the area of cognitive reserve?

How many of these drivers develop Alzheimer's disease over time, and at what ages? Was their disease progression slower than for other patients?

Would massive memorization be a way of preventing Alzheimer's or slowing it down?

Should we get rid of GPS and go back to maps?


Here is a video.

London Taxi Drivers' Brains


http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/london-taxi-sci

Iris L.