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jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 1:13 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 19534


This was an email from Abe's. I wonder if students read these any more.

https://www.abebooks.com/books/features/50-classic-books.shtml?cm_mmc=nl-_-nl-_-C190423-TRD-clabksBWRARE-_-b2cta&abersp=1


chrisp1653
Posted: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 2:27 PM
Joined: 1/23/2017
Posts: 1266


I can't recall being encouraged to read those particular books when I was a student in the Oakland, CA school system back in the 1960s, but at least six of them have passed through my hands. Some stories have been read and reread many times over the years. Some favorites of mine that are not on the list are Les Miserables, Advise and Consent, and anything written by David McCullough.

I don't know if these are too contemporary to be considered classics, but they do encourage introspective thought, and shed light on different horizons, so they're on my list of " must reads. "


Jo C.
Posted: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 3:30 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


I have read 20 of the 30 recommended classic fiction novels; so that leaves me with another ten good reads to go from that list.

What I would do without books, I do not know. I have been an avid reader since a small child.  from first grade on; I was a good reader. (Terrible at arithmatic.) I checked out books year round, but during the summer, I checked out five books per week or so from the public library and read and read and read; we had no television.  In my teens, I continued on making best friends with the library and it has carried on through my adulthood.

Gosh; there is nothing like a really good book; they carry me away.  I also enjoy good film, so that too is another form of a story.  This is what I do at night when going to bed and when I wake up before the rooster, I get some reading time in. 

God bless all good writers, we so need and enjoy them.

 J. 


jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 5:44 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 19534


Chicago schooling...I read all but 2 on the fiction list before I graduated from HS 1959. I guess reading was "big into".
Jo C.
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 3:04 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


I grew up in the U.P. of Michigan and we too had much assigned reading of the classics.  Some of those books on Abe's list were read in early childhood.

Interestingly, one of my favorites as a kid was, "Silas Marner."  I also liked Charles Dickens.  I learned to love the old language and still do today.  It is beautiful.

Kind of like reading a Bible; I do NOT like reading it in todays easy-peasy NIV language; I want to read the formal classic text; it is so much richer.

It is like Renaissance Art; takes the breath away just looking at it.

It is a wonder our heads don't explode from all the reading we have done.  Still lots of room up there I hope so we can continue on.

Kids in some schools today do get some classics to read; I know my grandkids did in Oregon.

I also find myself enjoying TCM for those old classic black and white movies.  Really an art to the lighting and shadowing; very complex during those times.  I gnash my teeth when I see those that have been colorized.  Awful and very artificial.  We are also thankful for PBS and are Members; they do a pretty good job of it.

Ah well; guess that is showing I am no longer 23.  Ha!

J.


SelEtPoivre
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 8:38 AM
Joined: 3/8/2018
Posts: 827


With a teacher-mom and a dad who “always had his nose in a book”, I’ve read 344 books since 12/2006

IMHO that list is missing a few as classics:

The Great Gatsby / FS Fitzgerald

Rebecca / Daphne Du Maurier

The Quiet American / Graham Greene

 Little Women

The Diary of Anne Frank

Frankenstein and Dracula

 


ruthmendez
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 9:22 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Oh my! The Great Gatsby and Little Women! Believe it or not, I read that whole Little Women book, but it was so long ago! I just remember being proud that I was able to read that whole book...and one time I named a feral black and white cat who appeared to be wearing a tux with white gloves, Mr. Gatsby....he was a cutie and popular in the hood.
jfkoc
Posted: Friday, April 26, 2019 11:29 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 19534


Long ago and far away I read every night. This illness brought on years when I could not concentrate. I am just stating up again and love having a library that is part of a nationwide system. I have yet to request something that they could not get.

Anyone else read all of the Agatha Cristies?


LizzieC
Posted: Friday, April 26, 2019 6:04 PM
Joined: 3/28/2018
Posts: 307


Years ago I read many books by Agatha Christie.  Raymond Chandler is another good detective novelist. (He wrote in early 1900's)

And yes, Jo, I also do not like reading the Bible in today's watered down translations. However, I have been know to "cheat" with an easier translation when I have a hard time understanding a difficult passage.


ruthmendez
Posted: Friday, April 26, 2019 10:02 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Another favorite but so long ago....Great Expectations.... I should reread
chrisp1653
Posted: Saturday, April 27, 2019 3:08 AM
Joined: 1/23/2017
Posts: 1266


Seriously... if there was any place I could go within the fictional world, I believe it would be 221B Baker Street. Every couple of years, I reread the entire collection of the Holmes stories.
Jo C.
Posted: Saturday, April 27, 2019 9:00 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


My favorite, favorite buildings are libraries.  I love the feel of them,  I love the smell of them, and I feel such peace when in one. Fits me like my hand in a glove.   Blindfold me, put me in a library without telling me where I am, and I would know without being told where I was.  Nothing like them and they hold so much knowledge, information, entertainment and escape within the wonderful world of books.  Bless the authors.

Where I grew up, there was no television reception in our tiny town.   I learned to read easily and very early; so I spent much time at the library.  The following photo is of the Carnegie Library in my home town that was built and depended upon iron ore mining.  Andrew Carnegie donated the library as he did for many small towns across the U.S.

The children's library is downstairs in the lower level.  I remember the libarian back then; a stern, tall, thin woman; gray hair in a bun and she had a wooden hand.  Rather disconcerting to a small child who walked over a mile to get there all by herself each week. 

Duing the summer, I would walk to the library to get my five books, (library limit), and then would walk downhill to a newspaper store that sold candy.  I would buy a small bag of red hots, (only candy my pennies would buy), and then on home.  If not playing, I would be propped up against a large tree with a book and my red hots being transported into a story.

In the bleak, dark, freezing days of deep winter, having the library and books was especially appreciated; couldn't go out to play much of the time because the weather was so bad.

I am deeply appreciative of libraries and books; they have added so much to all the years of my life.

Image result for photos carnegie library ishpeming mi

J.


GothicGremlin
Posted: Sunday, May 5, 2019 6:21 PM
Joined: 4/7/2019
Posts: 194


That's a great list of books!  I had to read many of them when I was in high school, and enjoyed them.  Some I read on my own, and there are probably 8 or 9 of them I haven't read.  The Secret Garden is one of my all time favorites.  What about A Wrinkle in Time though?

And the Agatha Christies!  I love those too. My aunt collected them, so I'd go over to her house and read them when she was done.