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No more beach trips, I guess
ruthmendez
Posted: Sunday, May 26, 2019 10:57 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


I'm not sure what happened, but my dad may have had a seizure today. It was a very scary experience for me, because I've never seen one before.  
I have noticed a subtle change at night with his breathing, and I assumed the beginning symptoms of aspiration, but I'm no medical expert.

While I was bathing him this morning he would do sudden trembles with his arms.  As if he felt cold (but he's never done that before) or had sudden fears or memories of falling, losing balance-type of tremble/motion/reaction.  I just assumed that once I'm done bathing him, I can warm him up with two blankets.  

Then, as I was shaving him, he continued with short trembles.  After,  I raised the bed for him to watch TV in his room, then I prepared his breakfast.  Before breakfast he had a few strawberries and one sip of water.  Then when I began to hand feed him, that's when he had the horrible attack.  If was very intense, contraction of his arms and his face totally tightened up.  He made an intense tightness type of sound.  I f***en freaked out and ran to call 911.  I was frustrated being asked many questions and I don't have a cordless phone.  I was in the other room.  I thought that was it, he's dying.

The 911 operator asked me to check on him and I'm freaken out.  My dad just had his eyes sort of rolled up and breathing horribly.  Soon the ambulance arrived and I did hear one of the paramedics asking the other "...when was his first seizure?....."  

The ER doctor said there is nothing abnormal, but if my dad is to stay, more tests can be done.  I told him if I can get a Hospice evaluation order, to see if my father will qualify.  I'm assuming this attack can happen again, and I'll just be calling 911.  

So, my father has been admitted and I may get to have a meeting with the doctor to discuss my father's future.  

Currently, my father is ok, back to his normal.  Eating fine and still talking his usual.

I guess I will no longer take him to our trips.  Originally, I was planning for our outing tomorrow, but I guess I'll just be at the hospital all day.  

By the way, my cat Cookie, she might be sick too.  If it comes in 3's, I wonder who the 3rd might be....

Funny, because I just visited a mortuary on Friday after my neighbor's birthday celebration to start a contract.  I guess it should be paid sooner than I thought.

I feel anxious now....just like moving non-stop.....I'm not good with relaxing.  

I wonder why no one really mentions the word Hospice??  It's like we just have to know this stuff on our own and ask.  I'm guessing the reason why it was different with my mom is because she was always saying "I just want to die..."  So that's why Hospice would kick in.  

In my father's case, doctors will keep treating and treating and they don't want to say "the dead-plan word".

 


Jo C.
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 9:50 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


Ruth, I am so sorry; what a frightening time.  It is good that your father is having a complete workup; the seizure may be caused by something that is very easy to remedy; so having a few things done to ascertain cause is good.  He is in a place that is "one stop shop," for diagnostics and do not have to run to labs and radiology as an outpatient.

He has been pretty high functioning, so knowing the cause for these seizures can be helpful.  Also, you can contact various Hospices yourself and ask them questions.  If you need them now, you are started; if you do not presently need them, you will know which one you choose if you need them in the future. 

It is best when contacting a Hospice, to ask to speak to the Nursing Supvervisor rather than talking to the phone person.  If they ask why; just say, "It is private."  They will get you transferred or the Supervisor can call you back if they are in a meeting, etc.  You can ask about their approach and philosophy for care; whether they are for profit, or non-profit; you can ask if they are a large or smaller entity.   You can describe your father's condition and ask how they would approach his care and if they have RNs and other staff that have dementia experience.

I usually contact three Hospice organizations and pick the one that seems the best fit.  As an RN and one who has used Hospice privately, I prefer a larger Hospice rather than the smaller Mom and Pop organizations.  The larger most often has broader services and better staffing for each geographic area.   Non-profits are good, but there are not many of them.
 
If you decide upon Hospice and decide which one to go with; a doctor's order will be needed, but do not worry about that.  Hospice will contact the doctor and get the order.

Initially you will get an RN who comes out to assess everything and takes pages and pages of notes; this is required by Medicare.  Equipment paid for by Hospice will come out within a couple of hours and you will be assigned your RN, Social Worker, bath aide. If you wish, you can also receive Chaplain visits.

 If you do not feel your RN or aide is a good fit, you can ask for someone else.  If you do not like your initial Hospice, you can change to another, BUT; you can only do this one time in any "certification period."  Ask the data collecting RN about cert periods.

 With any luck, this occurrence was a one time thing and perhaps related to electrolyte disturbance or other issue easily addressed.  If not; then you have your potential plan in mind.

 Again, dear Ruth; I am sorry and so hope all goes well. Please let us know how you are doing, I will be thinking of you.

 J.


w/e
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 1:01 PM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 1751


¡Ay, Dios mío!

What a scary experience it was for you, my dear.

I had a similar experience with 911 when my husband was on the floor of our bedroom having a sudden heart attack. I freaked out. After two or three directions from the dispatcher to me about checking this and that, I shouted finally to her, " I have no idea what is going on. I am no doctor. Get the f*** ambulance over here. Fast." They came in five minutes. The First Responders  tried to bring him back to me. I finally said, "No more. He is brain dead. Stop. No more. Do not resuscitate. It is his mandate." I still hear the echo of my words. My immortal beloved died in my arms ... I, loving him. He, loving me ... For all eternity... May he rest in peace.

Ruth, listen carefully to Jo C. She is the best. Follow her advice and guidance to a T.

Trust yourself in all you do. Whatever decisions you make, I am confident that you will make the right ones for you and your dad. In your situation.  I know you will have a clear mind. And a clear heart.

Kisses and hugs.



jfkoc
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 1:39 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 19534


 

horrible frightening!

Please let us know when you know more.........


ruthmendez
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 11:16 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Hello ladies.  I spent the whole day at the hospital.  When the doctor arrived he said that because of my father's disease, his condition will get progressively worse. 

He questioned me about intravenous feeding (I think he said intravenous??) and DNR.  I told him no tube feeding and yes to DNR.  Then he says, "...So we'll be checking him today, how he eats, and if all good, he can be discharged tomorrow...."  

WHAT?

Ok, so, I thought, "what happened to the tests for finding out what that attack was?"

I immediately asked him, "Do you know if that was a seizure??"  

He said he read my report, and because he didn't see my father having the attack, he cannot really know what that was.  BUT, he can order some tests to find out kinda where my father is.  MRI, EEG.  He later threw in a swallow test.

I also threw in the "hospice" request.  He said I can ask my father's primary or...(I didn't let him finish) I asked, "can a doctor here at the hospital submit the order so my father can come home with hospice if he qualifies????"

...he said it can be done and will send in a social worker.  

I'm not sure why it's like this.....I kinda get a weird feeling because my father only has Medicare....things are kinda different.  My mom didn't have Medicare, but did have health insurance and it was like we didn't really ask much (and obviously we didn't know much either), and mama sometimes would escape the hospital after being there too long because she hated waiting more days for more tests and tests after tests.  It was like they just told her, "we're gonna do this!"....With my father, it's like, "not much going on other than he's got dementia, but he looks good now....discharge"  

My neighbor told me maybe because I said the word "Hospice", the doctor felt that there is nothing I would do with the results of those tests.  However, she said, my father can still have those tests, and "....you're doing good Ruth!  Just be your dad's advocate and don't stop!"

I think I'm winding down now and will sleep in early.

Jo C, thank you for all that info.  I did read it prior to seeing the doctor.  He did ask me, "do you have any Hospice already in mind?"  I  said I haven't done any research.  He said, "...they are all pretty much the same...." (however, I'll keep your post just in case, and I have to especially remember about "certification period") And I asked if we can make sure the Hospice will accept his Medicare.

It's possible he still won't qualify.  My father is high functioning.  Today, everything was his normal.  He was nice today, smiling, talking (all gibberish, but talking), laughing, eating and drinking very well.

But I feel a whole new stress level and  on alert for the next horrifying attack.  The only thing that made me feel a little calmer was when the EEG technician explained to me that my father would not have felt pain during a seizure, if that's what it was.  

The EEG may have to be repeated, because my father kept talking, wouldn't close his eyes, I tried to hold his hands still.  The test was shaky, so I'm not sure, but the technician said she'll have the neurologist read it and decide if the test has to be redone (while asleep).  The good thing,  the MRI was completed today.  My father did move, but they were able to complete the procedure.  

Let's see if I find out anything tomorrow.


ruthmendez
Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 12:08 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Jo C, one more thing.  When I was going to ask Hospice questions a couple of years ago, I spoke to the phone person.  This hospice, I found through the Medicare web site.  The person on the phone said that sometimes some families will ask all the doctors to see which one would submit the order. After hearing that, I realized it's been frustrating for some families for this process.  From there, I did not care to continue asking questions and decided to wait until I felt it might be closer to time when he could qualify.
I just realized something right now too.  The EEG technician mentioned the neurologist's name who will be reviewing my father's tests. He happens to be the same neurologist who has been seeing my father for several years.  Maybe I can check with him and see if he'll submit the order, based on what he finds.

Jo C.
Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 9:20 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


Hello Ruth; Medicare will cover Hospice 100%.  At no cost to you, all staff including the twice to three times a week bath aide, all necessary equipment such as an electric hospital bed, special mattresses, and any other durable medical equipment, is paid for by them.  They even pay for Respite Care at intervals so the family can get much needed rest.  Medications for the primary diagnosis; (reason for admission to Hospice), is paid for; and some Hospices even provide incontinence supplies.   None of this is charged to the family.

With most Hospices there will be Hospice Volunteers who can visit and provide a bit of support.  Your Hospice can explain what is done with volunteers with their services.  Here is a good link that explains Hospice Volunteer services:

https://www.harborlighthospice.com/blog/roles-hospice-volunteers/

Sometimes even though the reason for admission to Hospice is the dementia, Hospice will admit with a different primary diagnosis for a co-morbidity; this is because it is sometimes best to do that for coverage acceptance; it is not at all unusual and is done all the time. Dementia and other conditions are listed as secondary diagnoses under such a dynamic.

NOTE:  The patient must be considered house bound except for doctor's appointments or church; this is something one can manage to meet with no problem.

The doctor must document the patient has six months or less to live . . . . BUT . . . . with dementia, there is often a bit of a different approach; Hospices know how to work with this.  By the  way, it is not at all true that one Hospice is the same as another. If by any chance, your father should not be accepted by one Hospice, contact another.   He should be accepted, but on the low chance he would be refused by one entity, it is often the case that he would be accepted by another.  It happens.

If the Neurologist or other doctor who comes to the room does not order Hospice; ask nursing to contact one of the other doctors for you and get a Hospice order.  No problem there.  And of course, if you speak to a Discharge Planner/Case Manager at the Hospital, she/he can provide you with Hospice names.  If you wish, you can contact Hospice and do as discussed in the above Post, and Hospice will make the call to the doctor and get an order.

Hospice may possibly not come out to do an assessment intake until you are home, but you can find out.  They will come out to the house usually within just a few hours of the referral being made, and when accepted - done on the spot, the equipment will be there within an hour or two.  Your primary RN will be assigned with other staff and you will see them asap though it may not be until the next day unless there are special circumstances.  It is best if your father is discharged on a weekday rather than a weekend as things will go more smoothly.

One must be aware that when one signs on to Hospice, one does not have their LO admitted to the acute hospital again unless there is a truly significant issue that Hospice cannot address and relieve.  You can leave Hospice any time you wish and then re-enroll again at a later date.

Since your father has had decline, and since he has also had a seizure, is a DNR and has other co-morbidities, he should be accepted into Hospice.  They will "certify" him for the first 90 day certification/benefit period; the second certification for need of continued Hospice is another 90 days; after that benefit periods for necessity of services are done every 60 days.

Since there will be test results; it may possibly show whether he had a stroke or whatever else; this will go into his Hospice reasons for providing service along with his dementia and other existing conditions; the more documentation, the better.  Even UTIs during the last twelve months count as part of it all.

Having a swallow test is a good idea while he is in the hospital.  It is non-invasive, done while sitting up on a guerney.   Nothing touches him.  A speech therapist usually conducts the test.  As tolerated, the therapist will give sips of water or thickened water, perhaps a bit of applesauce; sometimes a bit of cracker depending on how he is doing.  This is done with a fluoroscope placed in front of him.   Hospice intake will note any swallow difficulties as part of their intake, so be sure to find out the results of this test too.

It is fascinating to watch this test, because while he is swallowing, the fluoroscope shows it inside the body in real time starting at the inside of the mouth with tongue and chewing, then swallowing all the way down.  If there is any issue, they will be able to see exactly at what point the issue is and then can put a care plan together to deal with it.  I watched it being done with my LO and it really was interesting.

New territory, and I know how confusing and even overwhelming it can feel; hang in there.  Ruth, as always, you are doing a very good job of it under some really difficult circumstances and the unknown.  It will take just a bit of organizing and once everything is in place, it will be very helpful.

Keep us informed, we will be looking for your writing.

J.


w/e
Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 10:21 AM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 1751


Ruth, a bear hug for you and a soft hug for papi... You both are fearless. ( You can always fall apart in the quiet solitude of your bedroom-nest. Momentary tears, they can be cleansing. They can bring serenity to ones mind and heart. Been there. Done that.)

Accolades to you for your clarity of mind when you were working/dealing with the medical and social services bureaucracy. The bureaucratic hurdles that we have to jump over, it is the same all over the world. Especially for us "plain-common-peasant-working-class" folks... Just keep on keeping on. Being focused, determined, firm and clear. One hurdle at a time. And, remember, keep your cool.

Lastly, didn't I say that Jo C was the best, eh?... Study her guidance and advice... I wish I would have had her as part of  my team during my dementia odyssey.

Kisses.


jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 7:16 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 19534


I made the call to Hospice myself...no referral. In addition we kept our Dr. Please continue to update us.
ruthmendez
Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 12:21 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Finally made it back here.  First of all, thankyouthankyouthankyouthankyou Ladies! For the support and advice.
 
Jo C, thank you for checking on me and giving me tips that helped very much. As you all know, I don't know anything about medical stuff...so with your tip about the case manager/discharge manager, I realized I did a boo boo.  They both made their rounds yesterday and didn't say anything about the Hospice, so I assumed they were not the initial coordinators. I believed I heard the doctor say "social worker" so I was just waitin' and I didn't say anything to the case manager/discharge manager either....

Well, when I saw your post, I jumped on that right away.  I called this morning and told the nurse in charge to contact me when the case manager walks through (I went to work for a few hours).  I told her I would be there at noon.  So, she said she would call the case manager as soon as I arrived.

The doctor in charge came by at noon and took care of that part.  He had the case manager come in again to make sure I can get the Hospice started.  THAT'S RIGHT, Hospice.  We get started this week.

The MRI did not show any stroke or anything that would pin point what occurred, other than a typical view of someone with Alzheimer's/dementia.
Also, I believe the EEG was not repeated and it did not show any current activity of seizures.  Just "slow activity".

Yesterday, I had asked the doctor if my father should get any medication to reduce the intensity of the attacks.  He was not interested in prescribing medication for seizures and his reason at the time was "...we can, but why give him medication for seizures when we don't know if that's what he really has?..."

Today, he told me that the reason he was hesitant about prescribing the medication is because it can cause other side effects.  However, he did prescribe the Keppra and referred my father to his neurologist to see if that should be continued or whatever.

He also discontinued the bedtime Seroquel (which is a high dose).

For now, I decided I won't start the Keppra and not change his current medication until I discuss with his new Hospice team.

Now, I just have to get used to all this help they want to throw at me...(I prefer to be the bath aide person....but, my neighbor almost slapped me, telling me I have to get used to accepting more help). 

Ok, so, I'm not sure how the Hospice worked it out to approve service for my father, but apparently the administrators (two visited) took a look at my father's medical condition and the report of why he was there.

The reported reason for the visit in ER was dehydration.  I was not too concerned with it, because I know he gets plenty of fluids, and on Sunday I was running late starting his fluids.  So I didn't think much of it, until the administrator pointed that out, and explained to me that even though I'm giving my father fluids, his body is changing, and will not absorb the fluids as well.  

I told them I was concerned if he gets discharged from Hospice ("because my father is very healthy..." I thought) and asked them what happens then? Do I take him back to his current primary??  The administrator said she can help me with that part if that is to happen...but, I sort of got a feeling by the way they talked to me about the progression of the disease, that my father might not be getting discharged because they are expecting my father's body to be changing.  I guess we're on a new road again.

 

 

 

 


ruthmendez
Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 12:29 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


w/e wrote:

...

 And, remember, keep your cool...

I was a good girl ;o)

Jo C.
Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 7:39 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


Dear "good girl" Ruth, you got it accomplished!  What a time of it you have had.  I can imagine you must be pretty tired about now.  You were and are wonderful in how you stayed focused and got things accomplished even though it was all in a muddle.   Good for you, well done!  Hospitals and the heealthcare sytem are such a difficult places to maneuver.  It is confusing and most people do not know how it all works; things fall through the cracks and so many physicians through sins of omission do not do a decent job of interacting with the family regarding specifics of discharge planning and the actual needs in the home. 

Sweet Ruth; your neighbor did you a good service by giving you a mental wake up smack regarding the aide.   You can start with the bath aide and after a few weeks if you do not want her anymore; then you can make changes.  I am willing to bet you will keep the aide.

The aide bathes, shampoos as necessary, shaves. grooms, dresses as wanted, the patient and also does light housekeeping in the space the patient is in such as the bedroom and the bed will usually be changed.  The aide will only be there two to three days a week depending on need; it is usually twice.  They are only there for a couple of hours or so.  You can make a request regarding time of day the aide comes in so it suits your father best considering dementia is in the mix with all that means about his tolerance, acceptance and behaviors.

As for the Keppra;  it is good to consult with Neuro and Hospice about this.  To get yourself in a good place for discussion with Neuro, please do Google the drug and the side effects.  One must weigh the benefit versus risk.  The possible impact of severe behavioral changes needs to be part of the discussion.  There are multiple different meds for seizures of which Keppra is only one.  I so hope that the seizures your father had was a one time event and will not happen again.  It sure is scary when something like that happens.

You will now have support and guidance from Hospice.  They are there solely for your father AND for you.  That is priceless as things move forward.  You already have the first 90 day certification period locked into place; that is good for three months.  The RNs will be helpful in the recertifications.  You will have 24 hours access to a Hospice RN  including weekends and holidays. 

By the way, the Chaplain service can be started or omitted at any time. They do not come in all high gear with religiosity.  Most are just so kind and drop in as support and for talking if you wish.   If you want a prayer, that is there too, but it is not mandatory if that is not your thing.  You can pass this service by if you want to; it is not mandatory.

Did anyone say when your father is being discharged?  I so hope it is on a weekday rather than the weekend.  My favorite days for discharge were Monday thru Wednesday as that left a few weekdays in place prior to the less staffed weekends for many things.

I am wishing you a very, very good and supportive experience with Hospice. We will all be looking for your Posts to see how you are and how your dad is.

Big hug and warmest thoughts are being sent your way,

J.


w/e
Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 9:50 AM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 1751


First hurdle accomplished. Well done.

 ¡Olé!

Now, on to the next.

Always learning, adjusting, adapting.

 And ... bending with the winds of fate. In the time of dementia.

Kisses and hugs.


ruthmendez
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2019 12:02 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


w/e wrote:

First hurdle accomplished. Well done.

 ¡Olé!

Now, on to the next.  ...

NO! No more hurdles.  I'm getting old and tired!



ruthmendez
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2019 12:32 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Jo C, I forgot to mention that my father was discharged yesterday late afternoon.  He's home and looks the same.  Like nada happened.  

I'm a little annoyed that he was given a laxative at the hospital.  So now we're dealing with clearing that up.  We never give him laxatives....we give him pitted prunes.  

Yes, I agreed to once a week for the bath aide. Especially since summer is near....bath aide during the week, and I can continue the Sunday Super Wash with the Works Special! Ha ha.  

I'm also thinking that  if he develops contractures, it will be much harder for me to bathe him.  So I'll definitely need help.  I do move/exercise his joints to prevent contractures, if possible.

Tomorrow I will meet with the nurse at 10.  I plan to go over the meds and see what he thinks.  I'm not interested in the prescription for seizures at this time.  I want to see what happens first, and I hope he does not have anymore of those attacks.  I'm wondering how many attacks he may have had already....probably minor ones....

 

 


Jo C.
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2019 7:13 AM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


You are spot on Ruth, you have good instincts and are good at thinking things through and are practical; this will carry you far.

J.


w/e
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2019 10:29 AM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 1751


For everything, there is a season...

 Life is a process. It is not a linear process. There are splendid seasons of joy. Contentment. Tranquility. Peace. Love. Health. Prosperity.. Life has, as well, seasons with hurdles and heartaches and pain and despair and anxieties and fears. ¡Ay, Dios mío, there is no escape!... acceptance.

¡Ah, the body! It gets old and gray and wrinkled and easily fatigued no matter how many different "facelifts" we attempt to do. There is no so-called Fountain of Youth in my neck of the woods, as of yet. ¡Ay, Dios mío, from the biological age, there is no escape!... acceptance.

But... some-what, some-how, in some-way, we go on with the courage to be... ¡Oh, the "mind" ! It has the capability of remaining forever young. And fresh. And full of energy. Always being. Doing. Oftentimes, serene in non-doing. Always becoming... Like a kaleidoscope of a thousand colours, patterns and textures. The possibilities are as endless, as infinite, as is our imagination. ¡Bravo, magnífico!

Siesta time. Try to rest your tired body and soul. For you have been tossed around in a whirlwind.

Besitos to you and papi.


Jo C.
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2019 1:25 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


Sometimes I am surprised when I look in the mirror because I see that I am; ahem, "matured."   (Sounds better than being older.)  Seems strange as there is a great big party going on inside my head.  The outside should match, but alas.

"No more hurdles!" Declares our Ruth.  Let's hope for that to be. 

There were those times my LO had me tied up in knots and I was SO tired; then if I could; when I could, I would drive the 20 minutes to the ocean and sit for an hour or two.  It never failed to calm and renew me.  I could feel my shoulders coming back down to their proper anatomical position from where they had been up around my ears.

Watching the gulls play on the air currents, the sound of the waves, the smell of the ocean, the taste of salt on my lips and the breeze lightly touching my face; all of it so calming and renewing.  I really do love the ocean; especially in the winter when there is almost no one there. I do not even have to get out of the car; just park next to the sand and roll down the windows and slightly reclne the seat and I am so peaceful.  It simply seemed to lessen the tired feelings.

If I did not have the ocean, I would find a local park with lots of green lawn and trees and park myself there, listening to the wind soughing in the branches, the birds twittering, and just feeling a semblance of peace.  I am also a tree lover.

Hopefully, our Ruth can find a way to get out of the house for an hour or two from time to time.  Just so good to be able to breathe and not be walking on egg shells for a bit.

For me; it if was not for books, heaven only knows I would have been outside howling at the moon sometimes; I am a reader, cannot be without books.  They take me away for a bit of time, and have always been a big part of my life.  When I could not get to the ocean, when my LO was not an issue and there was nothing critical to address, I could escape between the pages of a good novel.  (A little chocolate along with that helps too.)

So; with guidance and assistance coming in, perhaps Ms. Ruth can find a way to let herself catch her breath and even give herself a bit of time to renew. 

J.


chrisp1653
Posted: Thursday, May 30, 2019 5:57 PM
Joined: 1/23/2017
Posts: 1266


Ruthie, every time I read one of these " beach " posts, I remember that although I enjoy the beaches here in Oregon, it was really Barbara's thing more than mine. I would contentedly sit in our motel room reading a book, while she would roam for hours on the sandy horizon, poking her stick to see if another treasure would find its way into her always handy ziplock bag. I admit freely that the idea of having a day " off " from taking care of her, so that I could go and enjoy the beach, would be an unhappy experience. On the other hand, I remember in my early days as an automotive technician, no one wore gloves, contrary to what we do nowadays... so it was with great pleasure today that I took apart an old machinist's vise, and forgoing the gloves, got my hands totally slimed as I cleaned, and then lubed it up.

By the way, for what it's worth, perhaps w/e meant hurdies, as opposed to hurdles. Hurdies is an old Scottish word meaning rump, or buttocks. At my present age, I would much rather jump over some rumps than attempt to hurtle over some hurdles. Just sayin', you know ?


ruthmendez
Posted: Friday, May 31, 2019 12:22 AM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


chrisp1653 wrote:

….

By the way, for what it's worth, perhaps w/e meant hurdies, as opposed to hurdles. Hurdies is an old Scottish word meaning rump, or buttocks. At my present age, I would much rather jump over some rumps than attempt to hurtle over some hurdles. Just sayin', you know ?

I've never heard of the word "hurdies".  But, I agree Chris.  I prefer hurdies from now on.

w/e
Posted: Friday, May 31, 2019 10:55 AM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 1751


Chris, I loved it! Thanks.

Jo C... Mirror. Mirror. The lenses in the eyes. And cultural differences...  Ways of seeing.

 A human being. A being of a certain age. An older adult. Mature. A senior. An old fart. A geezer. A wise elder. An old person. In all of her/his glory.

 Ahh! All of the above.

Mirror. Mirror. I contemplate. In awe. A unique splendid sapling. Developed. Transformed. Mature. With lots of sap. And a full-grown-white-crown. A long-lived. Well-lived. Life. A humongous leafy Tree of Life. An ancient tree. Wise. Serene. Still bending with the wind and sands of time. Surviving... Yes. An old human being. Somewhat detached from material life. In contemplation. Meditation. With herstory. To be admired. Respected. And hugged.

Ruth, now that your dad is back in the nest, what about starting a new post?


ruthmendez
Posted: Friday, May 31, 2019 4:24 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


w/e wrote:

...An old fart. ...

Ruth, now that your dad is back in the nest, what about starting a new post?

I think I'll go by the old fart.

For a new post, I need time to come up with the next big hit for Musings....everything has become boring at home again....  All I got is a bunch on youtube videos of cats and music I can share???

Anyone else wanna fill in? 



Jo C.
Posted: Saturday, June 1, 2019 2:59 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 11564


No Ruth; you are not being asked to "perform," finding stuff for our entertaiment.  We are interested in you and your Dad; how both of you are doing, and how Hospice is doing, and those sorts of things that matter to you; that means it matters to us too.

You seem more comfortable here on Musings rather than on the other Forums, so this is where we shall meet you.

This Thread is a bit long . . . . t'would be efficient to start a new Thread and then keep up with that now that Dad is out of immediate acute danger, out of the hospital and is home under Hospice.

That is what we care about.  Any other Threads you feel moved to start re other topics or "things," are only because you feel like doing it.  No harm, no foul; it is all good. 

J.


ruthmendez
Posted: Saturday, June 1, 2019 3:34 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2324


Ok ladies....I'll start a new thread.