RSS Feed Print
Process of Diagnosis
DogNut
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2012 10:01 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Hello all, thank you all for being here!  I am brand new to this board and really appreciate finding a place where I am among peers.  I am 54 and have been experiencing cognitive challenges for at least a year.   

 

They walked me out of work a month ago and won't take me back without a medical release.  Primary Care gal sent me to a Neurologist who said "probable neurodegenerative disorder", and then they expedited my Neuropsych testing which I just had today and will complete next Friday.   

My biggest fear is being diagnosed with EOAD...but my second biggest fear is NOT being diagnosed!  It would be really difficult to be having this much trouble functioning and not have some kind of explanation. 

Any tips on navigating the rocky process of trying to keep earning a living would be much appreciated.  thanks! 


Tonya2
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2012 10:19 PM
Joined: 12/8/2011
Posts: 33


Welcome dognut.....it can be a very trying process to arrive at diagnosis.....I am sorry about your job.....my suggestion would be to make sure your neurologist is a cognitive specialist....I know others will have good advice.....

Best,

Tonya

Lewy body dementia dx @ age 46 first symptoms age 35


Myriam
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 12:22 AM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


A small percentage of AD is genetic. Does it run in your family? Make sure to tell them if that's the case because the gene can be identified, though genetic testing can be expensive. Wishing the best for you! &gt;:D< big hug
kate4450
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 6:05 AM
Joined: 12/7/2011
Posts: 11


Welcome to our boards Dognut.  I'm truly sorry for what brings you here.  I too had to leave work suddenly because of cognitive disfunction.  It took almost 6 months to get a diagnosis so hang in there.  The neuropsych testing should help out alot with your diagnosis.  But as was said before, make sure your neurologist is a specialist in cognitive disorder.  My first neurologist was not and that's what caused part of the delay in my diagnosis.

 

Does your past employer have a short term disability plan?  If yes, look into it immediately.  I was placed on short term disability throughout the diagnosis process.  It was a financial lifesaver.  Once I was diagnosed I qualified for long term disability.  I have just recently applied for social security disability.

 

Take care and keep us updated when you get you neuropsych results.  Kate


Geegee
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 9:59 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 514


Dognut, welcome to our online family and boards.  I'm sorry about your job situation.  I echo the good advice above and add that you read as much as you can that's available on the Alz.org website. 


 

At this point, knowledge and trying to maintain a positive attitude will help you get through this.  Know that you are not alone.  We are here to help any way we can.   


 We have members like Tracy  and Lisa who were diagnosed at younger ages who can be helpful to you.  I was diagnosed with Alzheimer's 2 years ago in February when I turned 63.  Every person with cognitive issues is affected differently and responds differently to treatment. 

 

Please let us know more about you and how things are going.  Welcome. 


Mimi S.
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 10:06 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Dognut,

Another welcome to this site.
Yes information will be most helpful.
Please ask your library to order this book if they do not have it:
The Alzheimer's Action Plan by Doraiswamy and Gwyther of Duke University.
You can compare their gold standard of what testing should consist of to what you are getting. You should also have had a complete physical, lots of blood tests and one or more brain scan.  A PET scan and lumbar puncture test would be nice, but at this point very few insurance plans cover it.
Do get to know your local chapter. Calling the help line can get the phone #: 1-800-272-3900. Ask if there is an Early Stage Group in your area. They are few and far between. I've just begun one in my area of NE PA.
Stay with us.

JAB
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 11:15 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


DogNut, hi, welcome to the message boards. 

 

Do you have any family or close friends who can help you with getting the information you need, understanding the neurologist's diagnosis (when you finally get it), getting paperwork completed, etc?

 

If so, please suggest that they join us on the Caregiver Forum and/or the Spouse/Partner Caregiver Forum.  We may be able to help them help you.


Iris L.
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 1:14 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18354


Welcome to the message boards, Dognut  There are many diseases and conditions that cause memory loss and mimic Alzheimer's disease.  That's why it is so important to be evaluated by a neurologist who is skilled in ruling out these other conditions. 

Some of them might be hormonal problems, including thyroid and testosterone (manopause), vitamin and other nutritional deficiencies, (vit B12, vit D), chronic infections, (Lyme), hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders, sleep apnea, and depression.  There are others, these are just the most common.  These causes of dementia may be treated and reversible if caught in time. 

Also, check ALL of your medications for side effects and drug interactions, including non-prescribed and over-the-counter and herbal medications.  You might want to consult a pharmacist or check online. 

Don't hesitate to post any questions or concerns.  You are on a rough road but we're here for you.

 

Iris L.  


DogNut
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 1:52 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Hi Tonya2, thanks for your kind reply.  Yes, I am being seen at a huge regional teaching hospital with a Memory Clinic recommended by my local Alzheimers Association, so I am incredibly fortunate to have access to some really good care.
SteveSanJose
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 2:17 PM
Joined: 1/3/2012
Posts: 189


Welcome dognut dog 3 clip art  I'm glade you found us.  I was diagnosed with MCI, the first step to posable AD at age 59. Thats when I stoped woirking for Paramount. I did graphics, anamation, and titles for 31 years. There is a retirement pension at my work ate ate 62. I asked if I could retire early do to health. Thats all I said. Thay said yes. Next hearest thing was giving up driving. Are you there yet ? I get Social Security Disabiliy also. Look in both. Cantct your locial AL ASSN chapter, also. You are not alone.   smiley toothy grin clip art
DogNut
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 2:31 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Hi Miriyam:  

Yes, my Mom died of AD at the age of 78 (although now that I've been doing all this research, I can see she showed symptoms 15-20 years before)  and my Dad's Mom died of AD at the age of 83.  So I guess I've got the winning ticket from both sides of the gene pool.  (Please, no offense to anyone intended...its just that humor IS my higher power.   )


Any thoughts on the Pros and Cons of genetic testing?  



DogNut
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 2:36 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Hi Kate:

Thanks for your kind advice.  Unfortunately, no Short Term Disability is offered from my employer, and my state does not offer State Disability Insurance either,  but I am checking out the paperwork for the Long Term coverage offered by my employer.  


DogNut
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 2:49 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9



\Hi Mimi:

Just downloaded the Kindle version of the book, thanks so much for the tip.  Have had 2 separate MRIs, a CAT scan, numerous tests on my blood, and physical exams by the Neurologists (still makes me giggle when then use that funny little red triangle shaped rubber hammer on my knee and my reflex makes me kick the doctor!).   


At this point, it seems like I know a lot of conditions and diseases I don't have, but my reading tells me that is how figuring out an AD diagnosis goes.  


Its so helpful that I get the benefit of all the wonderful folks on this board, I feel very lucky to be living at this time in history and to be a little more techno-savvy than the average bear.


DogNut
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 3:06 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


And yes, I have excellent support from my spouse/partner.  Fortunately she is a therapist and thus has a great capacity for understanding.


And wow, no need to check for medicine interactions because I don't take any.  Until these cognitive challenges showed up, I've been a very healthy gal.


And double wow, thinking about all your questions and suggestions has sorta helped me do a little "life inventory" and I'm feeling incredibly fortunate right about now!!!  You have also helped me remember that its always been my optimism, my humor and my stubbornness (hey, same as persistence, right?) that have helped me thrive in the past.  


Looks like I'm about as well-equipped for this adventure as one could be!




Ttom
Posted: Friday, January 13, 2012 3:10 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 182


DogNut wrote:

 I am 54 and have been experiencing cognitive challenges for at least a year.   

 

They walked me out of work a month ago and won't take me back without a medical release.  Primary Care gal sent me to a Neurologist who said "probable neurodegenerative disorder", and then they expedited my Neuropsych testing which I just had today and will complete next Friday.   

  

Any tips on navigating the rocky process of trying to keep earning a living would be much appreciated.  thanks! 

 

 Hello DogNut and welcome. I was 55 when I began my evaluation a know the feeling of "getting walked out the door". I hope your tests come back soon so you can begin to treat your problem.  

 

If they do diagnose you with " dementia, probablly alzheimers' type" you will automatically (upon submission) qualify for SSDI. That will be equal to what you would normally qualify for at age 67. I will attach a link so you can start that process.

 

SSDI

The Alz Assoc has prepared a checklist on how to apply:
http://www.alz.org/documents/n...l/SSDI_checklist.pdf 

 

 

 

 

Three important things to remember. #1) It is very important to keep a positive attitude, there is always hope and #2) you are not alone and #3) re-read #1

. #1) It is very important to keep a positive attitude, there is always hope and #2) you are not alone and #3) re-read #1

My story,

 

 

I’m not a professional in this area. I’m a person with AD that serves as a volunteer on the message board. In June of 2008 (age 5 I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s related dementia. Maybe is Stage 5 but now in mid stage 4 due to the marvelous drug therapy. Yes, I’m very lucky and I wish the best for everybody also! I keep a journal to serve as my instant memory now.

My spiritual gift is one of caring and I hope that I can use it here. The Message Board and http://www.alz.org in general is the most informative site I have ever ran across. Feel free to use this site as well as seeking support from other sites. Please note that only this organization is working world wide with governments to fight Alzheimer’s.

I began visiting this message board in August 2008 and the people have become important to me. I’m sure that you will find a number of supporters here for you.

I will attach a link to a site that will lead you to your local Alzheimer’s Association

Chapter. Those people will be able to assist you with local resources and thoughts to improve your life:

http://www.alz.org/apps/findus.asp 

 

Please call the 24/7 Helpline at

 

 

1-800-272-3900 if you have any pressing issues!

 

 

My disclaimer:
I'm not a professional in this area, only a person with AD that cares about others and can express myself yet. Diagnosed at age 58 in Stage 5, now appear firmly in Stage 4 for now- wonderful meds! I 'm 62 now..

We encourage you to call the Alzheimer's Association's 24/7 Helpline

1-800-272-3900 . Ask for a Care Consultant who will be available

Helpful hints for slowing the progression:

  1. Get Early detection
  2. Start the required drug therapy
  3. Avoid stress
  4. Mediterranean diet with antioxidants and Omega 3
  5. Mental and physical exercise


LATER... Tom

 

 

 
 


JAB
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2012 11:01 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


Hi, DogNut.  If your mom and your dad's mom were that old when they died of AD, then they had what is called "sporadic" AD.  The risk of you developing sporadic AD is somewhat higher than the average person's ... but not a lot.  This type of AD -- which is far and away the most common -- is not inherited per se.

So it does not sound like genetic testing would tell you anything.

If you live in the U.S., and you've been working and paying taxes, then you've probably been paying into Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) all this time, and should be able to access that if your problems turn out to be something that isn't readily treated.  Early-onset AD was recently added to the "compassionate allowances", to expedite processing of applications for Social Security benefits.  So if you are indeed diagnosed with EOAD, you'll want to apply for that ASAP.

http://www.ssa.gov/compassionateallowances/

http://www.alzfdn.org/Medicare/allowance.html

As Ttom mentioned, the Alz Assoc has prepared a checklist on how to apply:
http://www.alz.org/documents/national/SSDI_checklist.pdf

I imagine it will be difficult to impossible to obtain long-term care insurance at this point.

Please do invite your partner to join us on the Spouse/Partner Caregiver forum.  I imagine she has many questions and concerns, and we may be able to help her.

 

One thing the two of you need to start looking into right away, if you haven't already, is Medicaid issues.  We have at least two members who ran into very serious problems because they lived in states that do not recognize domestic partnerships, their assets were commingled, and they did not seek legal advice early enough.  You would want to consult an elder law attorney specializing in estate planning and with plenty of experience in Medicaid issues. 

You can look for an elder law specialist at:
http://www.elderlawanswers.com
http://www.naela.org/MemberDirectory/
http://www.nelf.org/
http://www.caring.com/local/elder-law-attorneys

See also:
http://www.alzconnected.org/discussion.aspx?g=posts&t=2147484706
 


SteveSanJose
Posted: Saturday, January 14, 2012 1:52 PM
Joined: 1/3/2012
Posts: 189


Some Alzheimer's Association chapters of elder law attorneys, volunteer their time for clients of that chapter. I got one from the Northern California chapter. I don't know if all chapters have their service. I am also, not diving disability insurance, per say, from my former employer. I get a retirement pension. There was a option in my tension that let me get in early for health reasons, if you retire early because of health. You don't have to give a reason. Having EOAD is long-term disability, not short. All states have the federal SSI and SSDI plans though Social Security .With EOAD or her role is within 30 daysaprovel is within 30 days. Coolest Smileys
Michelle 50
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2012 8:34 AM
Joined: 12/28/2011
Posts: 43


Glad you found this board. Very sorry for what your going through! I am 56 and  was there just one month ago. Fortunately my Dr was very good about rushing the testing process and all testing was completed in a week neuro testing, blood work, MRI, and and EEG I had to wait another week for the final results and I was diagnosed with EOAD. I was started from day one on an antidepressant and anti anxiety. I have also been started in Aricept. I have not needed the anti anxiety for the past couple of weeks since things have settled down. I was able to get disability from work since I had to leave because of the anxiety and also am waiting to hear about SS disability. I would look into trying to collect short term disability from your job if you had it. Even though they let you go I'm sure it was probably related  to your disability. I know getting the diagnosis was hard but I have a lot of hope. My family and friends are very supportive which I'm very greatfull for. I am looking forward to getting involved in a clinical study in Boston on neuro imaging but I have to be on the aricept for 3 months. Hang in there!
Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2012 7:45 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Michelle,

 

You sound in great spirits and that's important.

Have you been told about Best Practices? I believe that, my attitude and meds have kept me cognitively ahead of the game since I was diagnosed over five years ago.

 

Best Practices.

1. Take meds as directed.

2. Strenuous physical activity. You have to get that heart beating !!!

3. Strenuous mental activity.  Learn a new language, musical instrument. Write your life story and correlate with all those pictures waiting to get sorted. Use non-dominant hand. Do art activities.

4. Mediterranean diet. I also take Omega 3 and antioxidants. No smoking.

5. Maintain or increase socialization. No couch potatoes.

 

Have you gotten to know your local Aliz. Assoc. Chapter people?

 

Think about joining us in DC at the Aliz. Forum, April 23-25. There is a special gathering for those of us with the disease at 2 PM on Monday, the opening day. 

 

Those of us with the disease do not pay a registration fee!  

 

If you can travel by yourself, your local Chapter may be able to find you a roommate. 

 

And think about that wonderful express service from Boston, either downtown or Route 128, direct to DC. Look for the "Quiet Car". Although I was on another one the other day and it was pretty quiet. Just a little kid asking her mom, "Why don't I ever get to sit next to the window first?"  Roomy and a short cab ride to the hotel.

 

See you there?

 


hpuckett
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 6:19 AM
Joined: 1/17/2012
Posts: 5


Am 65 yo male, still working. hope it is ok to be in your group. my genetic link is trong for AD, and last year had a cranial mri indicating atrophy that is "atypical". short term memory issues, and some agitation / confusion as sun starts to go down of a day. coping so far.  workin fulltime still but finding it harder and becoming a bit oc about "keeping things going". sucessful so far and "undetected" although have made a few boo-boos that are uncharacteristic of me. work as a database admin for a large company.

 

just trying to get a a grip at this point. want to work until they boot me, no plans at all to ever not work, God willing. what should i be asking my personal doctor to do to assist me (diagnosis, treatment, etc).

 

thanx.


Geegee
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 1:32 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 514


Hi Michelle, welcome to our group and family.  Mimi has given you some great newcomer advice.  Would love to see you at the April 23 Forum.  I'm jealous that you and Mimi are within the area where you have the option of taking a train!  For me it's the hassle of a flight and cab.


If you want to start a new topic at any time, just select the green "add topic" and title it.  We look forward to hearing more about you.


Geegee
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 1:44 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 514


Hpuckett, welcome!  We are glad that you joined our group but are sorry to hear that you are beginning to have problems.  It's good to know you are still working.


My advice is to hang on to any long term and short term disability insurance that your company offers.  If you have it in place, you are fortunate.  Once you have a diagnosis, it seems impossible to attain it.  However, I am not a professional in that area and cannot advise you.


Other members may answer your question here about questions for your doctor.  However, I would recommend that you start a new topic (thread).  By doing so, all of the members will see you question as the title and then respond directly to you.  That gets you more feedback.


Go to the top of this page and select the green "add topic" bar.  Title your discussion and then start your question.


Sorry I don't have the answers.  Just know you aren't alone.  We are all here to help you any way we can.



SteveSanJose
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 5:29 PM
Joined: 1/3/2012
Posts: 189


Have you contacted your states department of rehabilitation? They could help people that are currently working keep their jobs as long as possible. They do more than help disabled people look for work. If you had read genetic tests, that check for the Alzheimer's gene; and that should've come counseling. I would contact your local Alzheimer's Association Chapter. They can give you referrals to agencies that will help you deal with the problems you were having at your job and living skills.
JAB
Posted: Saturday, January 21, 2012 10:35 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


DogNut, I saw your avatar last evening, and was hoping to see a post from you, letting us know how you're doing...
DogNut
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 12:30 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Update: 2 long days of Neuropsych testing (with a week off in between) and the diagnosis seems to lean toward Anxiety and too much job stress.  While I am relieved that they didn't diagnose EOAD I am also not so sure I trust their accuracy.  Sure seems to me that the memory and concentration problems came first, causing said anxiety.  


They want to follow up with testing again in 6 months.  Work won't take me back in ANY position without a release, and the docs won't give me a release.  They recommended a 6 month "medical leave" which caused me to burst into tears.  Having NO short term disability coverage offered by either my job or my state, I may be "lucky" enough to get a few hundred bucks a month from my company's version of Long Term Disability insurance.  Most of that would go to paying for my health insurance, for which I am on my own because the company does not contribute at all when on any kind of leave.  FMLA ends in about a week, which probably means I better resign before they officially list me as "fired" just in case I ever have the opportunity to get another job.  Guess that would mean COBRA for health insurance...no idea how much that costs but hey, probably won't matter since I will have no income anyway.  I am pretty sure my state has a program to get some kind of coverage, and while there is only one medical center I can use, fortunately I live in the same city where it is located. 


Ok, sorry to be such a whiner, but DANG!  Who the heck wouldn't be a little anxious at the prospect of the loss of their ability to earn any kind of income?  Does anyone actually ever get an SSD application approved for a diagnosis of Anxiety?  


(yes, yes, doing the Best Practices:  exercise, diet, don't take any meds, have support from friends and family, check out these boards regularly) but I am frustrated and scared and feeling a huge loss right now.  Don't care so much about the job per se, but the loss of any income really sucks.


thanks for listening to me rant...you folks are the best.


  


 




SteveSanJose
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 1:26 PM
Joined: 1/3/2012
Posts: 189


If you're not contacted your local Alzheimer's Association Chapter about this do so. They have people that have experience with this kind of problem that cab help. Blame problems like this on the recession.

This Recession Sucks

 


Michelle 50
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 1:36 PM
Joined: 12/28/2011
Posts: 43


DogNut,

 

I am so sorry for what your feeling Sorry 

 

My word you don't need to apologize to anyone at all . We are all here to listen and support you with your feelings and experiences. What a heavy load you are carrying

right now. It's  so sad that money or lack of it can cause such havock in our lives and to our spirit isn't it! I'll think of you with very positive thoughts today in hopes of sending you some  peace of mind.

 

Michelle Polar Bear 


JAB
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 3:33 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


Hi, DogNut.  I guess that's good news, in its own way, but boy, does that leave you stuck.

Does the Memory Clinic have a social worker you can talk to, about where you've been left financially?  I mean, first they say you're not all that disabled and then they won't sign a release ... how do they justify that?  Perhaps the social worker can talk with the doctors and get a bit better feel for your situation and what you need to do to protect your financial future.

Do NOT resign without discussing all the in's and out's with someone who really knows the laws where you live.

In many states, you cannot get unemployment if you resign.

Here in California, an employer can "allow" an employee to resign if the employee was unable to do the job and would have been terminated otherwise to still claim unemployment.  (Our unemployment office realizes it's to everyone's benefit.)  But ... the employer has to be willing to go that route, and is not required to do so.

I have no idea what resigning would do to your ability to collect long-term disability.

And ... do you think you'll start looking for a new job right away?  You can always look for a new job while still "employed" at your old job.

DogNut
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 4:12 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Howdy, JAB, help me understand...it seems my only two choices right now are resign or get fired.  Can't get unemployment if you get fired, right?
JAB
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 4:48 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


DogNut, generally speaking (at least, here in California), you cannot get unemployment if you are fired "for cause" OR if you voluntarily resign.  Unemployment is for those willing and able and qualified to work who are unable to do so for various reasons. 

  

If you resign, that implies you could have kept your job if you wanted to.  Ergo, the state of California isn't willing to pay unemployment.  (For example, I had an employee who resigned to accept what she thought was a better job.  I was very unhappy about it -- she left at a horrible time and without adequate warning, and I had trouble replacing her.  The new company went bankrupt almost immediately.  She tried to collect unemployment based on her work history with my company.  She was not allowed to do so because she voluntarily left, even though there was a position for her with us.  I.e., it was her choice that she ended up unemployed.)
 

  

In the exception to this rule I was mentioning earlier, if I, as the employer, tell an employee that I am going to terminate her because she simply isn't up to snuff (or because we're downsizing, etc), but I will offer her the option of resigning ... and she accepts my offer and resigns ... I can then tell the unemployment office that she resigned because I would have terminated her otherwise, and the unemployment office will let her collect unemployment.  The unemployment office realizes she's more likely to get a new job by accepting my offer.  But ... my company had to be willing to pay its share of the unemployment for this arrangement to work.  We weren't required to.
 

  

Note that I was not going to terminate her "for cause".  She was a sweetheart and really tried hard, but she just didn't understand enough to do the job effectively. 

  

Now, I don't know what happens in a situation when you are let go because you are unable to work for medical reasons.  I would think you should be able to collect unemployment.  I don't know whether that would be better or worse in the long run than collecting disability. 

  

So ... I would urge you to find out what you can and cannot collect if you voluntarily resign ... before you resign! 


JAB
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 4:54 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


DogNut, why don't you start a thread on the Caregiver Forum, and maybe also on the Spouse/Partner Caregiver Forum, to ask for advice on when and what to do.  Those are much larger forums and you're more likely to find people who have considerably more expertise than I do.

 

Also, see if there's a social worker at the Memory Clinic and discuss this with him/her. 

 

 And call the 24/7 help line 1-800-272-3900 to ask their advice.


DogNut
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 7:32 PM
Joined: 1/11/2012
Posts: 9


Thanks so much for all your info and insight.  I researched my state's requirements for unemployment insurance and they indicate that I must be "available and able" to work in order to receive unemployment compensation.


So "available" yes, but according to the docs not "able".  Geez, I miss California where they have SDI.  


I will try to track down a Social Worker as you suggested, that is excellent advice.  




Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, January 29, 2012 11:15 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18354


Dognut, I think it's terrible that you don't have short term disability.  Are you sure?  Suppose you had a broken leg.  Would you still not have short term disability?  Mental illness should be treated the same as physical illness.   

 

Do the doctors think you might eventually return to the same work?  If not, can you be trained for another line of work?  What exactly are the doctors telling you?  Are you getting treatment for anxiety?

The doctor's progress notes and testimony is so important in these matters.  They must be CLEAR or else any applications will be denied.

 

Iris L.