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Lyme's Disease and ALZ connection?
alz+
Posted: Thursday, June 19, 2014 5:20 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


http://lymedisease.org/news/hardscienceonlyme/802.html

 

better links than this one to spare research, but what if taking the IV treatment for Lyme's spirochete in brain eliminated one's "ALZ"?

 

There is research connecting MS to Lyme's infection and people can now be treated for Lyme's. If you are interested in finding a cause for your brain shrinkage and memory loss and all the other difficulties that are now now labeled ALZ through process of elimination of other possible causes (except Lyme's) please post info here.

 

The treatment listed here...

http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/treatment/

 

Patients treated with appropriate antibiotics in the early stages of Lyme disease usually recover rapidly and completely. Antibiotics commonly used for oral treatment include doxycycline, amoxicillin, or cefuroxime axetil. Patients with certain neurological or cardiac forms of illness may require intravenous treatment with drugs such as ceftriaxone or penicillin.

For detailed recommendations on treatment, consult the 2006 Guidelines for treatment developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.External Web Site Icon

Approximately 10-20% of patients (particularly those who were diagnosed later), following appropriate antibiotic treatment, may have persistent or recurrent symptoms and are considered to have Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded several studies on the treatment of Lyme disease which show that most patients recover when treated with a few weeks of antibiotics taken by mouth. For details on research into what is sometimes referred to as “chronic Lyme disease” and long-term treatment trials sponsored by NIH, visit the NIH Lyme Disease web site.External Web Site Icon

Additional information on prolonged treatment for Lyme disease is also available.


alz+
Posted: Thursday, June 19, 2014 5:39 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


CDC: Late disseminated stage (months-to-years post-tick bite)

Approximately 60% of patients with untreated infection may begin to have intermittent bouts of arthritis, with severe joint pain and swelling. Large joints are most often affected, particularly the knees3. Arthritis caused by Lyme disease manifests differently than other causes of arthritis and must be distinguished from arthralgias (pain, but not swelling, in joints).

Up to 5% of untreated patients may develop chronic neurological complaints months to years after infection4. These include shooting pains, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, and problems with short-term memory.

Arthritis

Arthritic kneePain and swelling in the large joints (such as knees) can occur.

Lingering symptoms after treatment (post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome)

Approximately 10-20% of patients with Lyme disease have symptoms that last months to years after treatment with antibiotics5. These symptoms can include muscle and joint pains, cognitive defects, sleep disturbance, or fatigue. The cause of these symptoms is not known, but there is no evidence that these symptoms are due to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi. This condition is referred to as Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). There is some evidence that PTLDS is caused by an autoimmune response, in which a person's immune system continues to respond, doing damage to the body’s tissues, even after the infection has been cleared. Studies have shown that continuing antibiotic therapy is not helpful and can be harmful for persons with PTLDS.


Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, June 19, 2014 12:51 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18519


This is a plausible area of investigation.  It is well known that untreated late (tertiary) stage syphilis can result in dementia.  Syphilis is also due to a spirochete.    

 

Tertiary syphilis is easily confirmed by  blood testing.  Testing for untreated syphilis and lyme disease should be part of the work-up for dementia. 

 

Iris L. 

 

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Thursday, June 19, 2014 9:38 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


Some researchers believe that certain chronic bacterial and viral infections may increase the risk for Alzheimer's disease.  Spirochetes release an enzyme (phospholipase C) that is also implicated in Alzheimer's disease.


Good insight, Iris.


Iris L.
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 11:59 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18519


Lane, is phospholipase C involved at all in anti-phospholipid syndrome?


Iris L.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 2:24 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


Excellent question, Iris.  This is the closest I could find.


Anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACA) are antibodies often directed against cardiolipin and found in several diseases, including syphilis,[1] antiphospholipid syndromelivedoid vasculitisvertebrobasilar insufficiencyBehçet's syndrome,[2] idiopathic spontaneous abortion,[3] and systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE).[4]

ACLA [anti-cardiolipin antibodies] + Col [collagen] increased the activities of phospholipase C (PLC)...


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12199800


I suspect, however, that anti-cardiolipin antibodies by themselves can activate phospholipase C early on because phospholipase C activation leads to the production of peroxynitrites.


Vascular disease and atherosclerosis are significant clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome. Oxidation is one of the major factors responsible for atheroma development in this context. Anticardiolipin antibodies seem to play an important role by inducing nitric oxide and superoxide production, resulting in enhanced levels of plasma peroxynitrite, which is a powerful pro-oxidant substance.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12967525


Lane Simonian
Posted: Friday, June 20, 2014 9:48 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


This takes two steps, but it probably provides the link between antiphospholipid syndrome and phospholipase C.


Thrombin generation in antiphospholipid syndrome.

Thrombin Stimulates Phosphorylation of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor, Insulin Receptor Substrate-1, and Phospholipase C-γ1 in Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

Potentially anything that increases phospholipase C activity such as various autoimmune diseases, various chronic viral and bacterial infections, environmental toxins (such as mercury, aluminium fluoride, various pesticides, diesel fumes, etc.), high levels of glucose and fructose, high blood pressure, and stress can contribute to cognitive impairment.

Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, June 21, 2014 1:31 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18519


Thank you for the research, Lane.  The rheumatologist tells me that my cognitive impairment is due to antiphospholipid syndrome.  This is the first I've seen about the biochemistry involved.  You've given me an area to research for more  information.  Thanks again.

Iris L.

Lane Simonian
Posted: Saturday, June 21, 2014 10:15 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


You are quite welcome, Iris.  I think this is definitely an area to research more. From what I have read so far your rheumatologist may be right.  It seems that Antiphospholipid syndrome can affect the same pathways that lead to Alzheimer's disease.  Not to say they are exactly the same, but the same things that help in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (Mediterranean diet, aromatherapy, Namenda or perhaps some day Nitromemantine) should help with cognitive impairment that may be caused by Antiphospholipid syndrome. 


 


 


Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, June 21, 2014 11:53 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18519


Good to know.  There are many causes of dementia.  The majority of systemic lupus patients  have some degree of memory loss and cognitive impairment, and perhaps antiphospholipid syndrome is the cause for many of them.

Iris L.

Lane Simonian
Posted: Saturday, June 21, 2014 1:15 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5161


I think that you might very well be right on the mark again, Iris.