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differences between Lewy Bodies and ALZ
alz+
Posted: Thursday, April 28, 2016 9:18 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


https://www.lbda.org/

"Early and accurate diagnosis of LBD, while not always easy to do, is of critical importance for two reasons.

  • First, people with LBD may respond more favorably to certain dementia medications than people with Alzheimer’s, allowing for early treatment that may improve or extend the quality of life for both the person with LBD and their caregiver.
  • Secondly, many people with LBD respond more poorly to certain medications for behavior and movement than people with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, sometimes with dangerous or permanent side effects.
- See more at: https://www.lbda.org/content/it-lbd-or-something-else#sthash.br3BtosI.dpuf

"Alzheimer’s disease symptoms include a progressive loss of recent memory; problems with language, calculation, abstract thinking, and judgment; depression or anxiety; personality and behavioral changes; and disorientation to time and place.

Lewy body dementia (LBD) is an umbrella term for a form of dementia that has three common presentations.

  • Some individuals will start out with a memory or cognitive disorder that may resemble Alzheimer’s disease, but over time two or more distinctive features become apparent leading to the diagnosis of ‘dementia with Lewy bodies’ (DLB). Symptoms that differentiate it from Alzheimer’s include unpredictable levels of cognitive ability, attention or alertness, changes in walking or movement, visual hallucinations, a sleep disorder called REM sleep behavior disorder, in which people physically act out their dreams, and severe sensitivity to medications for hallucinations. In some cases, the sleep disorder can precede the dementia and other symptoms of LBD by decades.
  • Others will start out with a movement disorder leading to the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and later develop dementia and other symptoms common in DLB.
  • Lastly, a small group will first present with neuropsychiatric symptoms, which can include hallucinations, behavioral problems, and difficulty with complex mental activities, leading to an initial diagnosis of DLB.

Regardless of the initial symptom, over time all three presentations of LBD will develop very similar cognitive, physical, sleep and behavioral features, all caused by the presence of Lewy bodies throughout the brain.

- See more at: https://www.lbda.org/content/it-lbd-or-something-else#sthash.br3BtosI.dpuf
alz+
Posted: Thursday, April 28, 2016 9:21 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


  • LBD can have three common presentations:

    • Some individuals will start out with a movement disorder leading to the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and later develop dementia. This is diagnosed as Parkinson’s disease dementia.
    • Another group of individuals will start out with a cognitive/memory disorder that may be mistaken for AD, but over time two or more distinctive features become apparent leading to the diagnosis of ‘dementia with Lewy bodies’ (DLB).
    • Lastly, a small group will first present with neuropsychiatric symptoms, which can include hallucinations, behavioral problems, and difficulty with complex mental activities, also leading to an initial diagnosis of DLB.

    Regardless of the initial symptom, over time all three presentations of LBD will develop very similar cognitive, physical, sleep and behavioral features.


  • The most common symptoms of LBD include:

    • Impaired thinking, such as loss of executive function (planning, processing information), memory, or the ability to understand visual information.
    • Fluctuations in cognition, attention or alertness;
    • Problems with movement including tremors, stiffness, slowness and difficulty walking
    • Visual hallucinations (seeing things that are not present)
    • Sleep disorders, such as acting out one’s dreams while asleep
    • Behavioral and mood symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, agitation, delusions or paranoia
    • Changes in autonomic body functions, such as blood pressure control, temperature regulation, and bladder and bowel function.
  • - See more at: https://www.lbda.org/content/10-things-you-should-know-about-lbd#sthash.UoA5rgex.dpuf
    jfkoc
    Posted: Thursday, April 28, 2016 9:49 AM
    Joined: 12/4/2011
    Posts: 21248


    Thanks alz+....I have read that DLB/ is the second largest cause of dementia and that 25% of person's diagnosed with dementia have DLB.

    Because it  seems to be difficult to diagnose and the fact that a whole lot of Drs know little about it makes me believe that the percentage may be higher.


    Mimi S.
    Posted: Thursday, April 28, 2016 3:43 PM
    Joined: 11/29/2011
    Posts: 7027


    And this strengthens the advice to go to a good diagnostic center. Too often the GP says Alzheimer's with nothing but a 5 minute mini screening test to base the diagnosis on.
    llee08032
    Posted: Sunday, May 1, 2016 10:17 AM
    Joined: 5/20/2014
    Posts: 4408


    Twice over the past week I've noticed that my right leg seems to give out, sort of like it's caving in when bearing weight walking down the stairs. This caving in did cause a fall at work several months ago where fortunately I landed on the top landing on my butt. It felt like my whole body caved in but maybe it was the right leg. I have periods where I feel more alert but I imagine other do also? 

    I am being very careful coming down the steps. The black bug was back yesterday for a little while. They want another neuro psych eval this coming August. This will the 3rd. Also I'm hearing this type of pounding noise like the base is turned up in a speaker but it's in background noise when I'm watching TV and it's not coming from the TV. It's similar to how some people have the base turned up real loud in their cars these days but w/o the music. I always hated that loud pounding noise pollution and now I'm hearing it when it's not there! 

    llee08032
    Posted: Sunday, May 1, 2016 10:19 AM
    Joined: 5/20/2014
    Posts: 4408


    Thanks for this post alz+
    Iris L.
    Posted: Sunday, May 1, 2016 4:49 PM
    Joined: 12/15/2011
    Posts: 18513


    Ilee, it seems that we develop so many new symptoms, and then wonder if each one is related to dementia.  It can become tiresome.  Keep a record, so you can tell the doctor about your leg.  Be extra careful on stairs and on curbs.  Also, check your ears for wax buildup.  That can cause strange sounds.


    It's ironic--just as I posted, my neighbor began booming his car stereo--boom, boom, boom!


    Iris L.


    a_step@a_time
    Posted: Monday, May 2, 2016 12:42 AM
    Joined: 11/21/2015
    Posts: 237


    IIris, I agree about wax buildup.  Even when my sinuses do not drain, my hearing is weird.

    Those booms make the car move down the road.  


    a_step@a_time
    Posted: Monday, May 2, 2016 1:03 AM
    Joined: 11/21/2015
    Posts: 237


    LLee, rereading your post ...reminds me of some mild side effects I get from statin med.  Random muscle spasm like feeling in my thigh.  Some mornings I feel like I'm an 80yr old getting out of bed.  Hope you can get help !
    llee08032
    Posted: Monday, May 2, 2016 9:02 AM
    Joined: 5/20/2014
    Posts: 4408


    So true with the new symptoms always cropping up. I always have the sense that it's all relative to the motherboard that is our brain in some way shape or form. It's taken me a while to realize how all systems are impacted by the brain in sometimes seemingly strange ways. 

    Feeling eighty today waking up. It's damp and bones are achy. 

    Iris, I hated that boom, boom, boom when living in the city. It goes through you and startles at times. It's not as close here here in the 55 + community but sometimes filters in from the highway. 


    Iris L.
    Posted: Monday, May 2, 2016 12:48 PM
    Joined: 12/15/2011
    Posts: 18513


    Ilee, early morning stiffness is a sign of arthritis.  Have you been told you have arthritis?  If you feel cold and damp, you might change how you sleep.  I sleep in long johns, sweats, and woollen knee socks so that I stay very warm.  I also sleep on a synthetic sheepskin over the flannel sheet, because even a flannel sheet is not warm enough for me.  I like to be warm and toasty in the bed.


    Iris L.