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shingles and Internal Shingles activated by stress
alz+
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 10:09 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


L lee posted about a whole body shingles condition her doctor thought she might have. (Turns out it was BlueSkies)  

that post led me to finding information about Internal Shingles which just cleared up a lot of questions regarding my health issues.

Miracle of boards.

First there are chills and fatigue. Then small shingles outbreak, when blisters clear up I'd have episodes of intense pain under my right ribs. Thought this was side effect of antiviral meds but it is the same nerve branch but inside. Also possible to have gastro intestinal pain and problems, vision problems, hearing loss and all over body itching.

Very dangerous if on area around eyes, face, ears. If you have shingles do NOT get vaccinated until clear for 5 years - advice from doctor I saw for this round. If you want the vaccine ask your doctor what they think risk/benefit.

Commonly triggered by a wave of stress. Every December it starts for me, this year I had the loss of my dog, family problems, my Mother's death.

At least I will know I am not imagining this pain and that it is not a gallbladder or something when I see doctor Friday.

Even if I am mistaken about thinking L lee posted about "all body shingles" it led to me information and hopefully getting some help managing it in future.

People discussing it said Olive Leaf Extract helped within a few days and a B complex. 

1 in 4 people over 60 will get shingles. The antiviral should be started within 72 hours of onset of symptoms. It is not contagious (except for children who have not had chickenpox?).

 I can stand being confused but itching 24 hours a day for weeks on end? nuts.



Iris L.
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 10:45 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


Alz+, I did a brief search for internal shingles, and there is a lot to read.  You might want to check more.  


The other thing I want you to think about is to focus on stress relief, since you say your shingles reactivation every December is due to stress.  I cannot stress this too highly.  We need to be as stress free as possible.   


I don't think it is unreasonable for us to seek a stress-free life.  Our lives have changed irrevocably in one direction.  We're not getting any smarter.  We don't have control over our cognition or our nervous system, but we can have a modicum of control over our stress level.  We may not have control over what happens to us, but we can have control over our RESPONSE to what happens to us.  We can work on this.


Iris L.


a_step@a_time
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 10:48 PM
Joined: 11/21/2015
Posts: 237


 Thanks for this share. So sorry for your losses.  {Hugs}

Can try looking up rosacea triggers, as rosacea can have itch too.  (Avoid things like caffeine and nuts and even some fruit with seeds even though we don't eat the seed, like peaches. Even raspberries bother me at times).  It is getting harder for me to read to boards (due to eye floaters).  But I continue to try and take mental notes.

 Haha, just realized browser set default to tiny font, no wonder I'm having issues! LOL


Iris L.
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 10:58 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


Step, I have rosacea and I eat a lot of fruit.  I don't know how to get a handle on  it.

 

There is a way to increase the size of the font.   

Click on CONTROL and "+" at the same time, and the font will increase.  

Click on CONTROL AND "-" at the same time, and the font will decrease.

I also use BOLD to make the type easier to read.

 

 

Iris L.


a_step@a_time
Posted: Monday, February 20, 2017 11:35 PM
Joined: 11/21/2015
Posts: 237


Thanks iris I using tablet.  I like bold font idea. Trying it now.

 

Sticking to rosacea trigger (food avoidance) list for long period then slowly reintroduce trigger foods helped me reduce inflammation. Like trying to build immunity up. The list is long.  Leaves very few healthy things to eat when start on this avoidance list.
llee08032
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 9:17 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


The nerve branches/endings can still cause pain even if the rash is not present or when there is not an active outbreak. It was Blueskies who had the rare type of shingles. I have resp infection and am taking steroids. I hate steroids like I hate antiviral!
alz+
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 9:55 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Ha! I sent L lee a ton of info on this! 

well then I thank Blueskies!

Iris - I need to think about ultra low stress life. Have never had it and am just NOW learning self soothing methods.

I lived alone most of my life because that was low stress. Now my life would seem low stress to most people who did not have dementia.

The shingles in itself is high stress. IF this is Internal Shingles, and I suspect it is, then my efforts to keep up with daily exercise might be non productive. I fight the fatigue every day and this has been going on for years. When the hour comes in my day where I feel like I have some energy I walk the dog, further then I would naturally to keep things moving. then it is back to bed. I do not have energy to clean up my house.

First time ever I will let doctor tell me if this is possibly a chronic low level shingles and if there is a hope of getting over it.

My self soothing stuff is kind of limited. I did relax when I was rock hunting last year.

Note: I stopped the gabapentin because I thought it was giving me the stomach pains and intestinal issues. It was really working for cognition but even at 100 mg I was like too energized, sort of like Aricept. Intense energy in a body that could not handle the extra activity.

I wish I was not thinking about this escaping the doldrums all the time. Shingles is awful, the meds are awful, the aftermath is awful, the  itching is torture.



alz+
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 10:04 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


llee08032 wrote:
The nerve branches/endings can still cause pain even if the rash is not present or when there is not an active outbreak. It was Blueskies who had the rare type of shingles. I have resp infection and am taking steroids. I hate steroids like I hate antiviral!

********

L lee - I have bad reaction to steroids but was thinking, if they stop your SHINGLES maybe it would stop mine!
Oy vey. 
Guess I still don't have my head on straight. Takes along time to recover from emotional trauma, maybe that is what iris is referring to, emotional stress. That makes sense but could use some pointers. I have been doing good with maintaining boundaries.

For today I can see I am still spinning. Had good sleep last night, hope to get a massage today. If I am posting here with incorrect info, references etc should I continue or withdraw? Where is Paul Hornbeck? When is time to retire from boards?



Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 6:35 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


Alz+, as long as you are receiving a benefit from the boards, you don't have to retire!


While the shingles is reactivated and causing you so much trouble, why don't you devote your energy to dealing with the shingles?  Allow your body to heal, and pamper yourself.  Do you know that your body heals when you are at rest?  It won't help you to over-exert yourself.


Your emotional stress has not been for a long time.  Some people think that a month is long enough for official grieving, but of course, grief can take as much time as it takes.  You can't force healing from grief, or any other emotional trauma.  Treating yourself well will enhance the grieving process. 


When I was very young the adults used to make snow cream.  I guess it's like ice cream but made with snow.  Do you do that?


Iris L.




BlueSkies
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 9:00 PM
Joined: 2/24/2016
Posts: 1096


Alz, mine is called systemic shingles or disseminated herpes zoster.  It's rare.  My doctor said, leave it to you to come in with something rare.  Seems typical for me lately.  I got a steroid shot antiviral pills and steroid creme.  It's helping some, but very slow recovering.  I thought it would be gone by now.  The itching is the worst.  The itching comes in horrible waves.  Takes everything not to claw myself to death during these waves.  So frustrating.  Had to postpone move.  Doing what Iris said.  Resting and taking care of myself.  Hope you get to bottom of your issues and itching.  I can definitely relate.  Take care of yourself. ((((Hugs))))
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 9:56 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


Atarax is an antihistamine and may impact cognition, but it might be used temporarily  to help with itching for several days.  I am not familiar with how effective it might be for treating the itch of shingles.   Its use can be discussed with the prescribing doctor.


Iris L.


alz+
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:09 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Atarax is old med that stopped my son's hives in one pill. He had hives for about 6 months when young and I remember that pill! Itching can drive a person nuts.

adding it to my list for doctor.

Iris - I am going to do that, concentrate on trying to get the shingles back into remission.

BlueSkies! - so even though I also got YOUR shingle version wrong I am STILL getting help figuring out this thing with the nerve pain. I  woke up at 4am with that damn pressure and pain under ribs so just took a gabapentin which might put me back to sleep.

My Dad had hives when he had dementia. I remember he went to a dermatologist who gave him something that worked.

this is unlikely to be related, but the magnetic field on planet is doing new things and that field affects everything but maybe the rocks.

I also used witch hazel to help with itching but needed repeated applications.

Hope you get relief soon BlueSkies. 


llee08032
Posted: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:36 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Good luck w/ Dr appt Alz+. Blue glad you are focusing on getting well before the move! Feel better!
alz+
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2017 11:24 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


update:

shingles recovery

I took the advice of Iris and decided to focus on getting over the shingles above everything else.

Got my armada of supplements: B12 complex, Olive Leaf extract, D3, C + Minerals, and cut back on exercise, took what I needed to make me sleep.

Seems the fatigue is lessening, the itching has improved to tolerable, the blisters are gone.

I needed to be told to focus on healing.  

Even though I went through a crazy couple days fighting off my brother and sister over money (I won) and worried my rage would create another outbreak I am doing better!

The Olive Leaf extract supposedly helps eliminate viruses. Even if it is placebo, focusing on recovery was so smart.

thank you board for being there for me.

Doctor appointment was canceled due to her having flu, we go this Friday. Looking into if the Gabapentin is ok to use for awhile since it gives me ability to work around house.

I am still loopy and even though I was told to remember how stress knocks off cognition by 50% I did not believe it would come back.

It has come back somewhat, but I am still confused in new ways, this is taking more time to edit than a month ago, other things.

Having boundaries about who I can handle in  my life is new to me and I love it. I just can not endure other people's issues and problems bringing me down. 

love you all so much!


julielarson
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2017 11:44 AM
Joined: 9/30/2015
Posts: 1155


Alz, Love you too honey!
grandmalynda
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2017 6:22 PM
Joined: 12/3/2016
Posts: 374


alz+,I don't have any better suggestions for you other than the great advice you've been given.  But I do want to wish you peace and relaxation!

(((HUGS)))

--Lynda


Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2017 10:39 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


First things first!  I'm glad the shingles is getting put into its place!


I hope you will be pleasantly surprised by a resurgence in energy once the virus has receded and your immune system is back to its normal level of activity, Alz+!


Iris L.


llee08032
Posted: Wednesday, March 1, 2017 6:20 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Alz+ wrote: Having boundaries about who I can handle in  my life is new to me and I love it. I just can not endure other people's issues and problems bringing me down. 

I think at this point and time and stage in our lives that it is pivotal that we are selective of who we choose to be in our lives. 

First things first. Heal and get better, Alz+.


alz+
Posted: Thursday, March 2, 2017 11:13 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


I think many of us relate more to some people on boards than others, the advice just seems targeted for our constitution (?).

well Iris has always said things that I could understand and accept and she told me to "focus on getting over the shingles".

I might have already written this but the update is this:

I made a place in kitchen for my supplements to combat the lowered immune system from stress.

B 12 complex, Olive Leaf capsule, D3, C + minerals

I use the Gabapentin at night to sleep 7 hours straight.

I quit forcing myself to exercise when I was exhausted. Lots of water and veggies. I got a massage.

*****

this morning itching was down, no skin signs, the pain under my ribs is gone. I feel refreshed.

so I needed to be told to do this - it never would have occurred to me.

Hope we learned sometimes I need to just focus on healing and not try to accommodate other's issues. My family backed off went I went a bit berserk over hasseling me. Who would think ALZ could give me a chance to round out my ... ability to put myself first?

We can learn. The Gabapentin is making a huge difference esp now that shingles virus is retreating. Mini dose.



Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, March 2, 2017 2:33 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


alz+ wrote:

Who would think ALZ could give me a chance to round out my ... ability to put myself first?


We can all do to learn this lesson!


I'm so glad your life is coalescing on a better path, Alz+!



Iris L.

alz+
Posted: Sunday, March 5, 2017 8:29 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Intent is 95% of everything or something like that.

When I grasped the concept of healing the dang shingles everything else in my life fell into place. The itching is only occasional, the internal pain and pressure is gone.

I figure by summer I will not think about the shingles virus. Thank you all for providing direction and support.

ps: I have complained about my family trying to play me as an outsider and demanding I prove I repaid a short term loan from my mother from 2001. I refused. My son found the date I sold my house in Florida and knowing I paid the loan back within a week of that he told my brother and today my brother said he found the deposit entry in my mother's checking in that week, so I was "exonerated". 

I took offense as I never questioned my honesty but I thought right away "Don't get stressed or shingles could come back!" and let it go.

This is kind of ugly: Staying stuck on what anyone ever did or said became very much like beating a dead horse. I actually saw a figure doing that, how horrible it was for the person beating the dead animal, how horrible for even the dead animal. It was not going to bring any good or wanted result. Like an awake mini-nightmare.

Everyday I find something I like about ALZ. To let go of thinking people ought to be like I wanted is great news to this home.


Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, March 5, 2017 10:47 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


alz+ wrote:

Everyday I find something I like about ALZ. To let go of thinking people ought to be like I wanted is great news to this home.

 

This is a great lesson to learn, Alz+.  Isn't it wonderful that lessons come in odd places?  Lessons are all around us, if we only open our eyes and minds.



Iris

alz+
Posted: Monday, March 6, 2017 10:34 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


It seems ridiculous to me to feel this way, that ALZ has many benefits, but once I accepted I have it, life is precious, and my priest said this was my time to prepare according to our traditions (one of which is that "cheerfulness is a virtue") then the disease became another thing to handle. It stopped being a monster.

My views may be useless to many people, I think my lack of dread is because I have witnessed a few people who have lived with dementia and their deaths. None of them were empty vessels, mindless, unknowing, unfeeling. pitiable creatures who lost their humanity.

Becoming disabled is kind of part of life if you live long enough.

I also reject the brain's plaques and tangles are the cause of dementia.

So - maybe we all should define our disease in our own terms instead of thinking anyone can say "You have a few years left."

But yes, Iris, it is teaching me a lot, none of it is about preserving some past persona I once had. What experts call memory loss I experience as shedding memories I wish had never been created.

Love is always available to be tapped in everyone I have ever known, even at the very end. Maybe esp at the very end.



llee08032
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 9:40 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Thought I started with a winter rash like my son had. Started itching here and there a few weeks back and now I'm on full tilt with rash spreading and unbearable itching! Did not start taking antiviral  until last night because I didn't feel the usual burn and sting pains of shingles. There is some burning but it could be from scratching...Scratching so hard there is bruising! Have appt with NP for other issues and now trying to get to dermatology. NP does not like to treat rashes and will just send me to dermatologist anyway. 

On my 3rd bottle of colloidal lotion. Will look for olive leaf at pharmacy.

Ugh! Dermatologist can only see me at 1:30 same time I'm scheduled to see NP! The rash wins and trumps the other issues!


Will work on "ultra" stress reduction, not scratching so hard, healing and getting rest this weekend.


llee08032
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 10:28 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Now have 2 medical appt' to manage one at 1:30 and one at 3:15! Overwhelmed and vulnerable.
BlueSkies
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:18 PM
Joined: 2/24/2016
Posts: 1096


Omg llee, this is so crazy.  So many of us having the same problem.  I also had bruising everywhere and the doc said it was from scratching.  I didn't think I scratched that hard, but guess I did. Could be scratching in my sleep too. 

The dermatologist said this is related to dementia.  I did not know it is a common symptom in dementia.  Learning new things every day.  My heart goes out to you.  I know how horrible that itching is!  Hope you get some good help from the doc.  Hang in there and keep us posted on how you are doing. 

Sending a big hug and lots of love your way....(((((llee))))))


julielarson
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:31 PM
Joined: 9/30/2015
Posts: 1155


Wow dementia related! That is interesting to say the least.. Did he elaborate? I have been itching all over the place of late.. No bruising going on and not constant but still having it..
BlueSkies
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:42 PM
Joined: 2/24/2016
Posts: 1096


Julie, it's a she and she said it has something to do with the immune system and the body attacking itself.  I hope I got that right.  I also have chronic uveitis, costochondritis and intermittent joint pain and swelling.
jfkoc
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 12:48 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 21248


About rashes...We used to have a member JAB who started this site:

http://www.alzcompend.info/?p=233       

Maybe something here will be helpful


Iris L.
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 7:47 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


Thanks, Jfkoc, you read my mind.  I was trying to find JAB's website.  Thanks for posting.


Iris L.


Iris L.
Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 7:53 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18513


You ladies have been posting about itching, now I'm itching.  It's not shingles, though.  I have been using a new soap and a new lotion.  I read that bar soaps are more eco-friendly than the liquid soaps that I have been using for years, so I purchased a soapbar.  I went to a seminar on foot care and was recommended a lotion with urea for very dry skin.  Both purchases are backfiring on me.  I'm itching all over and my skin is drier than usual.  Fortunately, the weather is getting warmer, so I should be better soon.  I hope you ladies soon find relief with your itching and rashes!


Iris L.


llee08032
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:26 PM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Dermatologist does not know what its is. Prescribed steroid cream and strong antihisitmine. I have t tke antihistimine because itching is too much to bear w/o it. Forgot to tell dermatologist about dx. It's weird that we are all going through this skin rashey thing!
alz+
Posted: Saturday, March 18, 2017 12:50 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


My Dad had hives when he had ALZ and scratched the heck out of himself.

I am still itching, been years now. I think my Dad was given Atarax by a dermatologist - the only reason I can name that pill is because my son had hives as a child and we finally found a doctor who prescribed that pill. One pill and hives were gone and never came back.

I wondered about itching and ALZ. I think it is common but who would connect the itching to dementia processes?

Hope you all get relief!

The other night I woke up and poured with hazel down my back because I  did not want to wake up keeper. I have zero rash day I take Gaba, I take gabapentin once every 3 days so I don't get manic motor mouth disinhibition thing.

the choices! how about Mexico or Caribbean? 



llee08032
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 10:55 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Constant Scratching / Picking at the Skin

Many Alzheimer’s patients scratch themselves bloody — my mother did that.  Sometimes it’s an obsessive/compulsive behavior that’s almost impossible to stop. Other times, though, there is another cause. Among the many tips I’ve seen for trying to help the patient:

>> FIND THE CAUSE

First, evaluate the Alzheimer’s patient thoroughly to see whether something may be causing itching.
– Perhaps the patient has developed an allergy to the bath soap s/he uses.  Try different soaps, or perhaps substitute shampoo, instead of soap, to cleanse the skin.  Liquid soaps may be very harsh to delicate skin, so avoid those.
– S/he may also have developed a reaction to a laundry detergent or fabric softener.  Try different ones, preferably without scents or perfumes.
– If a woman’s face itches, it may be due to the makeup she wears.  Try switching to a non-allergenic makeup, or see if she’ll stop wearing makeup altogether.
– Also consider whether face creams or cleansers, perhaps a man’s shaving cream or lotion, might be causing the problem.
– The culprit could be bed bugs, lice, or scabies, all of which are on the rise all across the country; or (if you have pets) fleas.

The problem could be dehydration.  Be sure your Alzheimer’s loved one drinks plenty of fluids, preferably 2 liters of water a day.

Many of the drugs prescribed for dementia patients – for behavioral problems, sleep aids, slowing down memory loss, and depression – can cause severe itching as a side effect.  Other drugs commonly prescribed for older people, for blood pressure, prostate issues and many others, also can cause intense itching.  Look up the potential side effects of each medicine your loved one is taking.  This side effect may be listed either as itching or urticaria. You may find it listed under “Integumentary System.”  One of the best sites for researching side effects is RxList.

If you identify a medicine that can cause this side effect, talk to the doctor about the possibility of discontinuing it for a while, to see if it’s the culprit, and/or switching to a different drug.

An Alzheimer’s patient may develop obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms, although it is fairly rare.  Certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline, have been found to be helpful for treating OCD patients, and OCD symptoms in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients.  Talk with the doctor about the advisability of trying one of these drugs.

>> SOOTHE THE ITCHING

Keep any scabs soft with ointment, such as Mupirocin. (Dry scabs invite more scratching.)  Treat open sores with an antibiotic such as neosporin.  Sometimes Alzheimer’s patients will leave bandaids alone, so cover healing scabs with bandaids.  (NOTE:  keep an eye out for allergic reactions to bandaids with latex in them!  Allergic reactions can develop very quickly, and itch like crazy.  All bandage boxes are required to have warning labels if the bandages contain latex, but the warnings can sometimes be very hard to find.  Keep looking until you find something that indicates latex is not in the bandage.)

Tea Tree Oil can help scabs heal and stop the itching.  But be careful when first starting to use this product — it can sometimes be painful.  Watch for signs that the skin is turning red.

Some caregivers have reported success with Pure Aloe Vera Gel.  Be sure to get pure gel, without any lotions or other ingredients.  (If you try using sap from an aloe plant, be forewarned that the sap may stain linens.  Some caregivers have warned that it can also stain the skin a yellow-brown color.)

If the itching is caused by the Exelon patch, remember to put the patch on a different place every day.  Don’t “re-use” the same place for 12 days.  Clean the site well and moisturize the area.  If the itching/light rash persist, some doctors recommend applying Flonase to the skin after removing the patch.  A light coating of a cortisone ointment may also help, but be sure to talk with the doctor before trying this.  Cortisone is absorbed, and it might interfere with some other medicine the patient is taking.  Consult a doctor if the rash persists or spreads, or if the patient develops a rash in any place other than the site where the patch was applied.

Older patients often have very fragile skin.  Frequent bathing may not be advisable.  Switch from a bath to a shower, warm water rather than hot, and only twice a week.  If that doesn’t help, try sponge baths with a no-rinse product.

Keep the skin moisturized. Slather on lotion (people have recommended Eucerin, Aveeno or Cetaphil or other non-allergenic lotions) after each shower while the skin is still moist. Also put lotion on before the Alzheimer’s patient goes to bed. (Accompany this with a massage of the back and shoulders, to make the patient feel loved and pampered.)  Some doctors prescribe a Kenalog/Lubriderm lotion, to soothe the itching and keep the skin soft.

Over-the-counter cortisone cream may ease the itching, but use it only for small areas and only for short periods of time.  If it helps in the short-term but does not break the itching cycle, consult the doctor to see whether continued use is advisable.

Just as tylenol relieves minor pain, it will also reduce the sensation of itching. This can be helpful to break a cycle of itch/scratch or help to determine if there is an actual itch sensation that is causing the scratching. (Be sure to ask the doctor whether it’s okay to give the patient tylenol.)

Make an appointment with a good dermatologist if there’s any rash or redness or any other skin changes.

>> STOP THE SCRATCHING

If no cause for itching can be identified, and nothing you try seems to soothe it, then try other methods to stop the scratching:

Keep the patient occupied; and when s/he is just sitting, keep the hands busy.  Give the person something to hold – small, soft objects to “finger and fiddle” with.  This lessens the picking and gives the skin time to heal.  Some patients like a doll or plush animal.  “Stress balls” come in different colors and shapes, and won’t do any harm if the patient decides to throw it.  “Worry beads” may also work well.

Keep fingernails cut short.  For a woman, get her acrylic nails done, and tell the manicurist to make them very short and very thick – that can make it a bit more difficult for her to “gain purchase” under a scab or loose piece of skin.

See if you can get the patient to wear soft cotton gloves.  Tell a woman they are part of a “spa” treatment – if she thinks she’s being pampered, she may be more cooperative.

If the patient scratches his arms, dress him in long-sleeved shirts, or use “wristies” — elbow length sleeves with elastic at the top and bottom.  The patient may still pick, but at the fabric rather than his skin.  These are sold at websites such as Buck & Buck.

If all else fails, “posey mitts” can be used to give the skin time to heal.  These are sold by many companies … google to find the best bargain.  However, posey mitts are considered to be “constraints”, and may be frustrating and distressful for your loved one.  Only use them as a last resort; and try using just one, on the loved one’s dominant hand, and only during times when your loved one is agitated enough to pick or scratch his/her skin.


llee08032
Posted: Sunday, March 19, 2017 11:11 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4408


Back itching really bad to day. Found back scratcher which is probably making it worse. Having hard ime applying oinmtent on back.

Did not relize how dry skin is until I was in bright light at dermatologist office. She said while the colloidal lotion calms the itch it also drys the skin and told me to sue Cervae or something like that. 

Going to take lukewarm shower and apply ointment. Hope this finds everyone  feeling better.