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The positive side of ALZ
paolo38
Posted: Monday, March 19, 2018 2:32 PM
Joined: 11/9/2017
Posts: 6


From the Book: The Forgetting by David Shenk, page 194:

Alzlheimer’s keeps things new. After onset, the unfamiliar can never be familiar.

The Alzheimer’s mind is constantly flooded with new stimuli; everything is always in the moment, a rich, resonant, overwhelming feeling…

Ever-freshness, then, may be considered an Alzheimer’s consolation prize. ...”

 

 I heartily recommend this book for caregivers. It has been an excellent guide for me.


ruthmendez
Posted: Monday, March 19, 2018 8:51 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2329


Hello paolo38.  I haven't been able to enjoy a book for probably over 2 yrs now.  I was able to at least read a few pages of my abandoned book recently because I attended jury duty....

Anyway, what is David Shenk's personal experience with Alzheimer's?  Did he have a loved one with the disease?  

If I do purchase the book, why do you recommend it?  It seems it's about looking into the mind of the person with dementia.  I do believe my father is at that point right now where his short term is in chops.  Pretty much moment to moment, I would say in seconds.  Is that what the book describes?


Bob Sacamano
Posted: Monday, March 19, 2018 9:34 PM
Joined: 1/31/2012
Posts: 499


Paulo38,

No disrespect intended, but those quotes seem like something that could have been written in The Onion.
Jim Broede
Posted: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 4:07 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


We're all winners. If we look at life properly. And see the blessings we've missed. Oh, so many, many blessings. That we've overlooked.  --Jim
Jim Broede
Posted: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 4:29 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


Oh, Mr. Paolo. Are you, by chance, Sebastian or Guerrero? Give us your full and complete name. And where you come from. You owe it to us. Satisfy our curiosity. Tell us, too, more about your stricken wife. --Jim
BlossomsPack
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2018 8:10 AM
Joined: 2/21/2018
Posts: 83


Since Paolo didn’t chime back in and answer any of the questions asked by fearless readers, I took it upon myself to research one of the answers myself.

 

David Shenk is not speaking from personal experience. I found this information in an interview done about him that is available on the web. Here is a link to the interview. Within the interview David Shenk states that “Q. In your book you ask the reader to consider that after we cure Alzheimer's, it may be like life without winter. This is hard for some of us. I've had two relatives with it. Have you had any?

A. No. In no way am I saying that Alzheimer's is a good thing. It's just that by acknowledging that the disease exists there are some things that we can appreciate.”

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/02/health/conversation-with-david-shenk-forgetting-portrait-alzheimer-s-rising-toll.html

 


ThisLittlePiggie
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2018 10:46 AM
Joined: 2/19/2018
Posts: 44


Ummmm, if I were Paolo I might have been put off by the interrogation. But that's just me, apparently.
TiggerPooh
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2018 11:54 AM
Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 94


This little piggie, right!

I'm wondering on how much information I have to read that has to be about spinning this disease in some direction that is not at all real for me or my partner of many years?


Jim Broede
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2018 2:48 PM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


I believe in consolation prizes. Often they are better than the grand prize. Rather than give me a $200 million in the lottery. And not knowing what to do with it. I'll settle for a $1 million consolation prize. I'll find a way to handle it. Without lamenting over missing out on $200 million. A sign. That I'm not greedy. --Jim
ruthmendez
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2018 7:39 PM
Joined: 9/8/2017
Posts: 2329


I had to settle with $4.  I sign that I'm needy.
TiggerPooh
Posted: Monday, March 26, 2018 9:42 AM
Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 94


Honestly I wouldn't be here if it weren't for this blasted disease and I didn't wish to be here.
ThisLittlePiggie
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 7:12 AM
Joined: 2/19/2018
Posts: 44


Trying to look for the positive side as I was dressing my mom who doesn't dress herself, feeding her because she cannot feed herself. Couldn't really find it. Looking.
Jim Broede
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 11:38 AM
Joined: 12/22/2011
Posts: 5462


TiggerPooh wrote:
Honestly I wouldn't be here if it weren't for this blasted disease and I didn't wish to be here.

Might as well make the best of it. You could learn to love it here. With the proper attitude.


BlossomsPack
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:00 PM
Joined: 2/21/2018
Posts: 83


My husband doesn't have the alzheimer's brand of dementia, but rather FTD type, which manifests in more mood swings and behavioral issues. In this way, books that are dealing with alzheimer's type exactly are less helpful to me, but thankfully there is plenty written about other types of dementia as well now, so there is greater understanding too.
BlossomsPack
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:02 PM
Joined: 2/21/2018
Posts: 83


Jim Broede wrote:
TiggerPooh wrote:
Honestly I wouldn't be here if it weren't for this blasted disease and I didn't wish to be here.

Might as well make the best of it. You could learn to love it here. With the proper attitude.


Not sure I'm exactly "loving it" myself. And lectures on proper attitude are the last thing people going through this right now probably need. My opinion.


BlossomsPack
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:06 PM
Joined: 2/21/2018
Posts: 83


ThisLittlePiggie wrote:
Trying to look for the positive side as I was dressing my mom who doesn't dress herself, feeding her because she cannot feed herself. Couldn't really find it. Looking.

This is kind of close to what I am going through right now. I am also caring for my mom and my mom lives with us too. If I am gone from the house, even for a shopping, or a short errand, there has to be someone in the house with her. Thankfully my family is very helpful, but it isn't easy to see the positive side sometimes. Facing life with my husband deteriorating daily before my eyes is almost more than I can plan for sometimes, but being a practical sort, I am plowing through.