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Night time movement problems
​NorthWoods
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 9:29 AM
Joined: 4/6/2016
Posts: 344


DH is mobile during the day, walks without assistance, does light activities etc... but at night he has trouble getting into bed or moving once there. Is this “normal” progression or something I should be concerned about? It’s like his limbs become dead weights and he can not move them. I have to physically lift them. So weird, and frustrating. Thanks in advance
ExpressoTime
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 9:40 AM
Joined: 3/11/2018
Posts: 548


I don't know what stage your husband is in, but my mother has a little bit of that problem. She is about a 4-5. The more tired she is, the more trouble she seems to have lifting her legs into the bed. She gets it done, but she will sometimes sleep too close to the edge. However she does get up in the middle of the night and uses the toilet, so she must feel better after several hours of sleep.
JJAz
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 1:18 PM
Joined: 10/21/2016
Posts: 2452


Northwoods,

I have the same problem with my DH.  It turned out that there were other subtle symptoms that I didn't see at first.  Ultimately, he was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia.  One of the symptoms of this disease are the stiffness of the body with symptoms similar to Parkinson's.  Do some reading and then talk with your doc.  If DH is diagnosed with possible or probable LBD, please note that there are medications that are dangerous (potentially fatal) for LBD patients.  Very important.

Blessings,

Jamie


Ikan
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 4:57 PM
Joined: 2/15/2018
Posts: 87


DW has the same problem, I have to help her get into bed and settle her in but she cna get up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom and manages to get back to bed although often she prefers to stay up and just sit on her lift chair and sleep there.

I thought it was due to her sore shoulder and back (she fell and broke her shoulder bone two years ago) and she is now doing some physiotherapy to help with her back and shoulder problems, so far after two months we have seen no improvement,  so maybe like mentioned, it is the progression of the disease.


wolfewoman
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 5:40 PM
Joined: 1/1/2018
Posts: 204


Yes, My mom has that problem.  She moves slowly in general (unless she is in a highly agitated state) but when she wants to go to bed it's like her feet are glued to the floor.  (Back home as a kid we would say 'slower than molasses in January')  Her doctor thinks she has Lewy Body Dementia.
​NorthWoods
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 5:47 PM
Joined: 4/6/2016
Posts: 344


Thanks for the inputs. JJaz, I will read up on lbd. The thinking is that my husband’s dementia is primarily due to a severe traumatic brain injury so he doesn’t really follow the more common, and better documented, alz patterns. Trying to tease out the cause of any given change is so frustrating. Is it progression or a new problem? Is it a new complication from meds?  As I think back over the last month or so, I suspect that this is progression but I will see how the weekend goes and touch base with his dr on Monday. He is scheduled to move to MC soon so we don’t need any more bumps in this road.
MRY4Mom
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 6:18 PM
Joined: 1/12/2014
Posts: 394


Is LBD more common among males? Does anyone here know a female diagnosed with LBD?
JJAz
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 6:25 PM
Joined: 10/21/2016
Posts: 2452


MRY4Mom wrote:
Is LBD more common among males? Does anyone here know a female diagnosed with LBD?
Yes.  As I recall it's about 4:1, Male:Female

MRY4Mom
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 6:29 PM
Joined: 1/12/2014
Posts: 394


Thank you
ExpressoTime
Posted: Friday, March 30, 2018 6:50 PM
Joined: 3/11/2018
Posts: 548


My mother has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's. I was reading online as much as I could before her diagnosis, and I was getting very confused because her movements also sometimes included a Parkinson's shuffle, and her left arm tight against her side in a cramped up position in addition to her legs appearing heavy, or difficult for her to lift into bed. So at first I thought it was Parkinson's. Then the tight arm against her side disappeared and never happened again. She still shuffles, but not in the classic Parkinson's style. I think all dementias are somewhat related, or present in similar ways at times.