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StephanieZ, any ideas for help with eating?
rose_ro
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 1:25 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


I really enjoy reading your posts.  I haven't had a chance yet to go back and read more responses that might be there for my post on eating.

 

I was wondering if you had any ''tips'' for help in eating?

 

My mom is eating at all meals, but not always a lot.  We've been able to get her to have her ''usual'' mid-morning and afternoon snacks of pudding and fruit.

 

But - what kinds of food do some dementia folks like?  She's tired of getting a soup at every meal, lol.


Stephanie Z
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:24 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 4219


Hi Rose, Before we talk about AD, lets talk about aging. The body changes alot as we age and by the time we're 60 we've lost many of our taste buds. This is why a lot of people who are older complain that food tastes bland.

On top of this, the dementia probably skews the way we perceive taste to some extent. I found that with late stage dementia patients it's more about the texture of a lot of foods. Things that are creamy seem to be a favorite. Sometimes it's also the temperature.

Having said that, there are also ways to "spice up" foods to make them more appealing. You can add cinnamon or spices to some foods, honey to others. I had two patients that stand out in my mind. I wrote a story about one of them called Pickes, pickles and more pickles. Here is an exerpt:

 

One of our new patients had lost a lot of weight and this concerned me. I talked to Alice, Louise's niece  about her favorite foods and found out that she loved pickles. At her next visit, I asked Alice to bring in a jar of Louise’s favorites. I gave her one with her lunch and found that she ate the pickle but very little else. However,at dinner, I had the staff chop up half of a pickle and mix it into her mashed potatoes and peas. Amazingly, Louise ate most of the vegetables with the pickle in them. At breakfast we mixed a few bits of pickle with her scrambled eggs, at lunch we put them into her sandwich, and by dinnertime it was obvious that Louise would eat almost anything if it had bits of pickle in it. The staff started chopping up a half of a small pickle at each meal and sprinkling the pieces over whatever was on her plate. We started ordering low-sodium pickles to help avoid potential blood pressure problems, but Louise’s doctor gave this approach his blessing and was not concerned. Within a few weeks, Louise had begun to gain weight and was getting stronger.

 (Louise actually went from 85 pounds to 104 pounds by doing this)

 

I also had another resident who would not eat anything unless we drizzled chocolate sauce over it. This became a little bizarre as he even wanted it on his meat.  But for him it worked.

This is why I think the two most important things to consider is extra spice or sweetness, and consistency. 

Also, although it's best to give a healthy balanced diet, there will come a time when even the doctors will tell you to feed them whatever they will eat. I noticed another post just now that mentioned their LO was eating lots of ice cream. This is also not unusual and unless the person is a diabetic, people can survive a long time on ice cream if they won't eat anything else.

\Hope this helps, if not, give me more information on exactly what she will eat.

Stephanie



rose_ro
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 10:00 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


Thank you.  I'll write some more in a minute.  I was adding cinnamon to almost everything here at home!

 

Plus, I even have been missing it.  My food tastes bland without it, my coffee too!

 

(I actually didn't add it to everything for myself - but certainly some things)

 

My mom loves ice cream, loves pudding,yogurt...it's the texture, as you say, and I add cinnamon to all those things.

 

I feel like they're ''pushing'' food on her that she just doesn't want to eat right now.  It's almost like the kitchen staff feels bad that she won't eat more.  boo hoo, lol.

 

She had a banana and egg and juice and some oatmeal for breakfast.  My dad ''has'' to help her, but she's eating it no problem in the end.  I am making some steel cut oatmeal with raisins for my dad to bring tomorrow morning.  He loves it, too, says the oatmeal there isn't the same.

 

Just, thanks for now for your response. this is so disheartening to me.  My mom had a great appetite up until the summer.  Even after that, she was eating 5 times a day!  Breakfast, lunch, dinner and at least two or three snacks.  part of the problem I think is that the food is not available to her any time.  I am trying to schedule in real snacks, not just dry cookies, mid-morning, mid-afternoon.  She considers pudding or ice cream such a treat!

 

I also found out she likes oranges or tangerines in orange jello.  She ate hers the other day, and then mine when I left the table for a minute!

 

I want to find those ''miracle berries'' - they make so many things taste sweet.

 

but more on the pickles and doing that.

 

 


bela
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 11:11 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 4105


I loved the pickles and chocolate sauce stories.  My mom had a daily routine of having a coffee mocha from Starbucks every morning.  When I came to visit it was one in the morning one in the afternoon.  Since the progression of alzheimers she no longer finds coffee or coffee mochas appealing...(I was in shock).  She used to love chicken pot pies and I brought her one once and she didn't want it.  I believe for most of us it is trial and error.  Since my mom won't drink the mochas i get a short misto at Starbucks and ask for a short cup of whipped cream for mom (and a spoon).  They happily oblige us and mom loves it!  Now of course we hope to introduce things more healthy.  I was reading in "O" magazine that you can add lettuce (spinach) to a fruit smoothie.  There is no hint of taste of lettuce but it gives the smoothie green speckles which are quite pretty.  I have made smoothies for mom and she likes them--will be throwing in spinach soon.  A good health drink. Start small.  

Just keep trying every little thing.  Buy in small sizes until you find the things she enjoys.  Just keep experimenting and good luck to you.


rose_ro
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 11:43 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


Thanks, oh it's so hard!

 

I never ever thought my mom would have these issues!  not at this age or stage, at least...

 

There's some psychology involved, too...my mom doesn't seem to want to eat ''too much.'' Sigh.

 

I have to be a psychologist now, too!  Like - MOM YOU DESERVE TO EAT!

 

My mom used to love chocolate.  Not any more!

 

They did have a dessert the other day, just cream and strawberries.  I grabbed it for her, and she ate it all (still not a lot).  But that's her taste these days.

 

She had 2/3's or 3/4's of an Ensure banana muscle building drink tonight.  (i get her to drink it by giving her some digestion supplements that help her...)  Some mouthfuls of soup and main course (with my father, at dinner).  half a jello with oranges in it.  Ice cream, of course, at least a half cup of it.  a mouthful of red velvet cake and a small piece of fruit. (SMALL! PIECE!  and then A slice of tangerine)  You can tell what she doesn't like and what SHE LOVES.

 

I told my father that she had about 350 - 400 calories for dinner, by my count.   Probably 300 calories for breakfast?  I wasn't able to find out about lunch, or if she had a snack in the AM or PM.   I just needed a break today.  I get so worn out from all the things going on.

 

if she broke 1000 calories, or even got to 1200 - well, that might not be the greatest, but it's what doctors tell you to eat if you're on a diet!

 

We're going to try to help her with some things tomorrow, perhaps adding cinnamon, honey...whatever!  Making sure she gets those 100 plus calorie snacks of pudding, fruit mid-day.

 

There's a dietician supposedly there.  I'm wondering why I'm doing SO MUCH!  When she was here, if we added fruit to yogurt or pudding, she'd eat every piece of fruit (berries, etc)...if there was any left, I'd just add more fruit and she'd eat the rest of that...

 


eloquentsolution1
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 11:57 PM
Joined: 12/16/2011
Posts: 108


the last flavors that AD patients taste are salt then last, sweet.

 

i try to keep this in mind while preparing food.  also, make it visually attractive.  serve on a pretty plate.  make the servings small so as not to overwhelm them.


hija514
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 12:19 AM
Joined: 12/2/2011
Posts: 77


We're going through the same thing with my dad recently - my mom will ask him what sounds good (old habit) and he has such a hard time making decisions that he just says "nothing."  I've finally gotten her to stop asking him and just put food in front of him, in small portions he'll usually eat it.  Some things we've found that help:

 

1. Large, colorful (red) plate makes the servings seem smaller and look more appealing.

 

2. The less work he has to do to eat it the better, as handling a fork and knife are much more difficult for him now.  She'll cut up his meat, or pancakes or whatever into bite sized pieces for him.  Finger foods are great too.

 

3. Small, frequent "snacks" work better for him than actual meals.  It also encourages him to drink more water or juice, more often.  Some of his favorites are trail mix, "cuties" (small oranges/tangerines), apple slices with peanut butter.  We are going to try smoothies next (I like the spinach idea!)

 

It is hard to see your LO stop eating, especially when they always had a big appetite and loved food.  Good luck to you and please let us know how it's working out!


rose_ro
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 12:48 AM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


eloquentsolution1 wrote:

the last flavors that AD patients taste are salt then last, sweet.

 

i try to keep this in mind while preparing food.  also, make it visually attractive.  serve on a pretty plate.  make the servings small so as not to overwhelm them.


My mom does not like salty tastes at all,  And things often seem to taste salty when they're not really.  She's had high BP for some years and taught herself to avoid salty tastes.

 

The funny thing is, at one point we talked about making more soups, a few months ago.  But I think her idea of a soup is different than what reality is..It reminds her of home...She is not liking most of the soups!

 

I totally agree about the presentation.  I don't understand why they don't put more effort into it.  I like to go to the IL, get a nice plate, put a small amount of food on it, and let her pick her food.  If we have to do this for every meal, we will!  Plus, she can always have ice cream!

 

The food they're giving her is a large portion, but they say it's small! 

 

At the IL place, I got one meal, and divided it between us!  She so did not want the sauteed spinach...she scraped it to the side and told me she would not eat ANY of it!  Flashback to being a kid - and mom telling us to eat spinach!

 


rose_ro
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 12:52 AM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


hija514 wrote:

We're going through the same thing with my dad recently - my mom will ask him what sounds good (old habit) and he has such a hard time making decisions that he just says "nothing."  I've finally gotten her to stop asking him and just put food in front of him, in small portions he'll usually eat it.  Some things we've found that help:

 

1. Large, colorful (red) plate makes the servings seem smaller and look more appealing.

 

2. The less work he has to do to eat it the better, as handling a fork and knife are much more difficult for him now.  She'll cut up his meat, or pancakes or whatever into bite sized pieces for him.  Finger foods are great too.

 

3. Small, frequent "snacks" work better for him than actual meals.  It also encourages him to drink more water or juice, more often.  Some of his favorites are trail mix, "cuties" (small oranges/tangerines), apple slices with peanut butter.  We are going to try smoothies next (I like the spinach idea!)

 

It is hard to see your LO stop eating, especially when they always had a big appetite and loved food.  Good luck to you and please let us know how it's working out!


I think it will get better, if she can hang in there and keep getting some calories...but I'm frustrated that they're not more help in the SNF (the IL actually has nicer looking things to help eat)...I have to agre about the small snacks...it's kind of how we did things here before...I do have those tangerines, my mom liked them a lot at one point..I think Jerry Seinfeld's wife wrote a book about putting veggies into things to make them healthy...will look into that! 

 

A supermarket near us had these healthy chicken tenders...my mom used to like them...it just gets so tiring, when you think a place like this would KNOW more, as we all do here!

 

I do have a red bowl she likes, I'll work on using it more, and get some more.


rose_ro
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 1:00 AM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


I promised myself I would go to bed ''earlier'' today!  It makes such a difference...

 

I put together a care package for Dad to take tomorrow...I'll be there at some point, hopefully mid-morning to make sure she gets a ''real'' snack...

 

I put some things in it she should like, a lot perhaps.  If not one, then the other!

 

Oranges in orange jello (she loved something similar the other day)

A muffin (forget what kind,  lol)

Some tapioca pudding with strawberries, which she loves

Assorted tea bags

napkins, to make things look nice

a bottle of cinnamon

Cut up fruit (blueberries, melon)

Steel cut oatmeal with raisins and cinnamon...I added some honey too, tasted great!

Protein powder, just a teaspoon to add to something like the oatmeal, after it's warmed up (it has a little fiber in it, too)

 

 

I have other things I could have added, but she will probably eat her breakfast, and we'll see what she likes...

 

What's so hard for me is that I would like to lose weight!  Seriously, as I'm trying to make sure Mom gains some weight, or stay at the same weight, I would love to lose a LOT of weight!  It's so hard, so filled with conflicting emotions!

 

 


AlphaLeah
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 8:52 AM
Do you know what were her favorite or comfort foods during childhood?

Here are a couple of examples from my experience:

My grandmother (who died of end-stage ALZ) ate cornbread soaked in buttermilk (with a spoon - which had been a traditional dish when she was growing up in the hills of South Carolina) long after she stopped eating other foods. Also canned peaches were a favorite (the hills of SC are a big peach growing area - and the canned ones were easy to swallow).

My grandfather (who had vascular dementia) ate a type of cookie called Benne Seed Wafers (sesame seed thin cookies) with great delight when he was not interested in eating much else (his mother was so well-known in Charleston, SC, for her version of these that her recipe is enshrined as part of a well-known local cookbook).

So if you can find out from her or others what types of things she ate as a child, that might be helpful.
Stephanie Z
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:25 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 4219


Rose, don't get hung up on how many calories she is consuming. She is almost totally inactive and will need a lot less than an active adult on a diet. The facility should be weighing her every month at a minimum. You can request it more often. They are supposed to let the physician know if she loses more than 5 pounds. this will also trigger the dietician to make a visit and review what she is eating. She can adjust the diet so mom gets enough protein to prevent bedsores, and calories and nutrients to sustain her body.

You might also try melon if you can get it. The texture of a ripe melon, especially watermellon is pleasing and the taste is usually not altered by age changes, chemotherapy or side effects of medications.

Stephanie


rose_ro
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:28 AM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


Stephanie Z wrote:

Rose, don't get hung up on how many calories she is consuming. She is almost totally inactive and will need a lot less than an active adult on a diet. The facility should be weighing her every month at a minimum. You can request it more often. They are supposed to let the physician know if she loses more than 5 pounds. this will also trigger the dietician to make a visit and review what she is eating. She can adjust the diet so mom gets enough protein to prevent bedsores, and calories and nutrients to sustain her body.

You might also try melon if you can get it. The texture of a ripe melon, especially watermellon is pleasing and the taste is usually not altered by age changes, chemotherapy or side effects of medications.

Stephanie


  Thanks, actually, I haven't worried so much about calories.  I was trying to point out to my dad that adult women are often told to go on diets, with about 1200 calories eaten!  (a lot of men don't know much about diets, lol)

 

I did kind of want to do a quick count, if anyone talks to me, but once done, I'll just keep more in mind what she is eating..I do want her to get back some of her ''joy'' in eating...I saw the way she ate the jello!  She loved it!  And then she took mine when I wasn't there, lol!

 

Melon is a great idea.  Thanks.  I know she likes watermelon also.  They have it cut up often, and one day I gave her a plate when she didn't have a lot to eat.  She loved it, and ate it all with her hands, not fork or spoon.  But then when i wanted her to have more, she refused.  That's ok with me.

 

They did weigh her in the beginning, and I was amazed at how much she'd lost in the last 6 weeks or so, for her.  She was 111 in about mid-October?  or early October?

 

She was 102 the first week at the place (almost 4 weeks ago), then the next week 100.  I am not sure if they weighed her the next week, but this week she was 97.  This is with clothes and shoes on. 

 

Before she went in the hospital in the summer, I think she was about 120 or 116.  Because of the diverticulitis, they had her on an IV and didn't give her ''real food'' for some time, and then slowly...and then the meds affected her tastebuds.  She remember for some time after that she ''wasn't allowed to eat'' in the hospital!   

 

About this time last year, she was probably 125?  But she had been 116 for some time before that (I think the beta blocker caused some weight gain)...

 

My mom is probably about 5 foot, or at the most 5' 1''.

 

I hate to say this, but when she was in the 116 range, i was like, yes, do stay at a good weight Mom, but I want that weight, too!

 

Ok, once again, I have gotten lost in all the details and have to re-read this, lol.


rose_ro
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:34 AM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


AlphaLeah wrote:
Do you know what were her favorite or comfort foods during childhood?

Here are a couple of examples from my experience:

My grandmother (who died of end-stage ALZ) ate cornbread soaked in buttermilk (with a spoon - which had been a traditional dish when she was growing up in the hills of South Carolina) long after she stopped eating other foods. Also canned peaches were a favorite (the hills of SC are a big peach growing area - and the canned ones were easy to swallow).

My grandfather (who had vascular dementia) ate a type of cookie called Benne Seed Wafers (sesame seed thin cookies) with great delight when he was not interested in eating much else (his mother was so well-known in Charleston, SC, for her version of these that her recipe is enshrined as part of a well-known local cookbook).

So if you can find out from her or others what types of things she ate as a child, that might be helpful.

b  Thanks so much!

 

well, I now think that jello is a love of hers

 

great ideas....my mom was born in the depression era, so i think they ate whatever they could!  Which is why this is also a bit strange for me...my mom always appreciated ANY food!

 

I do think some of the food they cook is ''off'' for some folks...my mom has always wanted some of the foods she grew up with, and I've thought these folks at this place should sell some items like that in their little store, and cook some too!  But maybe the foods would be too ''plain'' for their place...

 

My grandmother (dad's mom) spent time growing up in Ireland.  She loved when she had certain foods, esp candy from Ireland.

 

I last week gave my mom an Italian cake I thought she'd like.  It's along the lines of what you say.  It's called Tres Dulches (darn, is that the spelling?)  We're not italian, but I love it.  It's basically a kind of Italian cake, soaked in cream.  Some fruits on top.  She liked it and told me she'd eat it again.  But I've only been able to get it in one place, which is the opposite direction of where she is now, and not close.  So - I've been thinking - should I soak some cake in cream, and add fruit?  I could try it.

 

I like your idea of canned peaches.  I haven't seen them serve a lot of peaches.  My mom will eat almost any fruit.

 

 


rose_ro
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 9:51 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


Dinner tonight was a lot better!

 

First, my dad said when I called this afternoon that my mom did a lot better at lunch...she had some soup, and then put her macaroni and tomatoes in it  

 

She had a snack, too, of some orange jello and oranges at some point.

 

My sister's family went to visit, and they went outside, to the courtyard - amazing weather for January.  My mom got into bed for about an hour or so, and my dad fell asleep in his chair.  When I got there, I found out what was for dinner in the IL, and persuaded them to eat there with me. 

 

I like eating there so much better.  As my Dad said, which is what I said in another post, the people in the IL dining area are so much ''more conversant.''  Turns out several people that saw us knew us from other places (church, whatever).  My mom and I didn't really talk to them, but my father did and he really likes that  kind of stuff.

 

My mom and I got there first, and we chose a table (I think she actually chose it) near another that we've sat at other times.  her back was to a lot of people, but also they had one of those fake fireplaces with actual warmth, and that was not far from her...My dad was doing something else for a short time.  I wish he was with us, then she wouldn't be by herself for any time...But she did ok.

 

I got some food for both of us, two things of orange jello with oranges for her...I took the food from one plate and put it on the other (I had meant to get a smaller nicely shaped plate but forgot).  Then I put some things back on it for her.  I took meat off the chicken thigh (SO tender), some veggies, a few small potato things (I don't know what they were, but they were good), some corn..She started eating it all just like a regular meal.  I was so happy!  She ate some and I told her, 'if you want that jello, you need to eat all your food''   She did, for the most part.  It wasn't a ton of food, but she seemed to enjoy it, and I kept talking about how much I enjoyed our time there.  When my father got there, he got his food and my mom offered him one of her jellos.  I encouraged him to get another one, so we could take her 2nd one back to her area.

 

She ate all of the one jello, and I asked her if she wanted any ice cream.  "Yes!''  (How come there's always room for ice cream?)  I got her to come with me, so they didn't think I was eating all this stuff myself, lol.  She enjoyed being around the food, seeing them serve people...and the woman serving up her ice cream.  She got to choose her flavor, and see what other flavors were available.

 

She gobbled it all up  

 

Just one good sized scoop of strawberry ice cream. 

 

When we got back to her room (and she did call it ''home'' )  I got her to drink about 2/3's of her dixie cup of their protein / vitamin drink (the one she had yesterday was in a bottle, and she had a lot more). 

 

A lot of the tension I felt about trying to get her to eat seemed to ease up. 

 

One funny thing, I asked her, "do you like the chicken?'' She looked at me and said, ''this is turkey.'' 

 

"Oh ok, Mom.  I thought I got chicken.''

 

She looked at me again.  "It's turkey.  REAL turkey!"'

 

 

 

Thanks for all the ideas, I'm going to get some canned peaches.  She also had a chance to see how many desserts they have.  I'd like her to go over there for at least one meal a day.  The dining area is open two hours, while the SN is just one.  You have a sense of being more relaxed AND they don't rush and take your tray away from you before you have a chance to decide if you're done! 

 

I'd also like to soak some cake in cream.  I thought a few weeks ago that things were going to be ''ok,'' but then realized this is going to be a work in progress.  But from the help and support here on this board, and what I know she likes, I think things will get better.


Stephanie Z
Posted: Sunday, January 8, 2012 12:03 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 4219


Rose, just a bit of caution when you give her things like cake soaked in cream. Some cakes get crumbly enough when soaked to cause coughing, especially if her breathing/swallowing pattern is off and she has a tendency to "swallow down the wrong hole" Unless she's had it before, give her only a tiny bit at first and if she does OK, still keep the spoonfuls small.

 

 Take care

Stephanie


rose_ro
Posted: Sunday, January 8, 2012 12:13 AM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


Stephanie Z wrote:

Rose, just a bit of caution when you give her things like cake soaked in cream. Some cakes get crumbly enough when soaked to cause coughing, especially if her breathing/swallowing pattern is off and she has a tendency to "swallow down the wrong hole" Unless she's had it before, give her only a tiny bit at first and if she does OK, still keep the spoonfuls small.

 

 Take care

Stephanie


  I totally agree.  The thing with the Italian cake is it is very very soft, and not crumbly.

 

i tried another kind of cake the other day, in some pudding or yogurt, and my mother wanted none of it.  i think she was afraid it might make her cough.  she does have a tendency to have ''issues,'' some can vary as to what's actually happening.  I usually give her very small bites, and haven't offered the cake to her again.

 

I have to look up what's actually in this Italian cake, see if anyone near us has it.

 

Thanks, I just feel so much better that things were ''good.''

 

Ah ha!  This is why i can't find it in Italian bakeries, and why the spelling threw me off - it's not Italian   it's in a supermarket, with mostly Italian pastry things, but this is just delicious and soft.

 

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/tres-leches-cake-with-dulce-de-leche 

 

I would leave the rum out!

 

---

''Dangerous. That's what this cake is. Dangerous. 

This is the type of cake that prowls through dark alleys at night, waiting to attach itself to an unsuspecting healthy person's hips and thighs, never to let go.
This cake is a fugitive. And the reward for it's capture is sheer delight and bliss... and a few extra pounds.
I kid you not when I say I could have devoured this whole cake in one sitting. This cake is deceptively bad for you.

 

The recipe doesn't contain butter, so the cake doesn't feel heavy. On the contrary. Despite being soaked through, this cake is as light as air. But that doesn't mean that it's not bad for you. Oh no, my friends. Where the butter leaves off, the heavy cream, condensed milk, and sweetened evaporated milk pick up. The three milks seep through every pore of this spongey cake and the result is a cake that drips with sweet, almost caramel-flavored milky goodness with each bite. And because I always feel the need to add rum where appropriate, I added rum. Yum to rum.  

 

This cake is Bad News Bears. It's a Highway to the Danger Zone. It's any other out-dated pop-culture reference I can use to describe this cake which is so bad for you but so good.

I dare you to stop after one bite piece half a cake cake.'

 

http://www.sporkorfoon.com/spork_or_a_foon/2010/01/tres-leches-cake-with-dulce-de-leche.html

 

 

I definitely think i could make this cake for her...the problem is - HOW DO I avoid eating it all before it gets to her!  lol

 

I might make a very small cake for her and see how things go...but I want her to eat more ''real'' food, as she did this evening.  This would just be ''extra'' or ''emergency''...

 

But everything i give her is basically small bites, small pieces.  And she has had an evaluation for her swallowing, although it's gotten better as time goes on.  Worse after the anesthesia.

 

 

 

 

 


rose_ro
Posted: Sunday, January 8, 2012 10:18 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 2431


Things at least are not so much in that ''crisis mode.''

 

My dad said she had half a bowl of soup at lunch, and half a sandwich.  Some other things. 

 

I mean - that's what Panera sells for lunch!  Half a sandwich, and half a bowl of soup.

 

I also pointed out to my father the other day that my mom never had really huge portions here for any meal.  I just knew how much to give her (and she did eat 5 times a day, with 2 snacks and the 3 meals)...

 

For dinner, my father went to Mass, and my mom and I took our time to get to the dining area in the IL area.  We stopped at the library, and she ''borrowed'' a newspaper, lol (which I returned, after I found it under her scarf!)

 

We sat in the same area as yesterday, with her back to the fake (yet wam) fire, and a lot of the people.  I could tell she was hungry and I was actually happy  

 

I took out the tres leche cake, and put it out for her (yes, I did pick up a couple of pieces this afternoon!)  I told her she could have it while I got some other food for her, and water.  Boy, she dug into that!  She was hungry, and I almost did a dance.  I have been so amazed when she said she wasn't hungry!  I don't compute that, at all! 

 

So she had about 1/4 of the cake piece (and it's a deep slice), really enjoying it.

 

I got her some water...should have gotten some soup, I think she would have liked this one today (forgot to check).  I got meatloaf, eggplant, mashed potatoes - just one meal, but then took a clean plate and put some small-ish pieces of each on it.  "Manageable.''  She ate it all, though!  And eating it all must make her feel good.  Instead of thinking she didn't accomplish something she was supposed to.

 

I feel like i had something else there, but maybe not.

 

But then, I had a plate of fruit that I gave most of it to her, cut up.  She loved it, and a scoop of sorbet.  And then, we went to get her a cup of strawberry ice cream!  So, a little heavy on the sweets in a way, but she's eating!  And she's feeding herself, which is a huge thing.  I didn't feed her anything.  Only a few days ago, I was feeding her a little, which she didn't like.

 

I don't worry about calories too much, I know - but she had at least 300, maybe even 400 or more? 

 

My father came back from Mass, and she enjoyed talking to him.

 

I saw the menu for this week, and my father made choices for the week.  There are some great items on the menu, so I think things will continue to work out.

 

i did buy some sliced peaches (Dole, in a jar, with juice in it not syrup) and a few other fruit items I know she'll like.

 

Thank you!  I do want to make some shakes for her.  And she also had some of her protein shake (1/2 a dixie cup)

 

I'm hoping she might even gain back a pound or two!