RSS Feed Print
Side Effects
nwlegaleagle
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 1:15 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


I'm moving from stage 2 to stage 3 and have become very depressed. I was prescribed Wellbutrin 5 days ago, but since I've suffered very loud ringing (tinnitus) in the ears. Thought it would go away, but it hasn't and it's been hard for me to ignore. Has anyone else experienced this and resolved it?
Ttom
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 2:25 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 182


nwlegaleagle wrote:
I'm moving from stage 2 to stage 3 and have become very depressed. I was prescribed Wellbutrin 5 days ago, but since I've suffered very loud ringing (tinnitus) in the ears. Thought it would go away, but it hasn't and it's been hard for me to ignore. Has anyone else experienced this and resolved it?

Happy to hear from you again Mim. I was diagbnosed at about stage 5 and due to the drug therapy and Gods good graces I have seeminly improved to about stage 4.

 

I've had tinnitus for a long time. Not really sure that I can blame it on the Alzheimer's but it definately has not ever improved. I even went out a bought some expensive hearing aids that were said to be able to reduce the problem. Don't waste your money!

 


JAB
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 2:40 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


Hi, nwlegaleagle.  Wellbutrin frequently causes "auditory disturbance", so I imagine that's what's causing the ringing in your ears.
nwlegaleagle
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 3:36 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Thank you Ttom and JAB. Guess I'll check to see if there is another anti-depressant  that doesn't have that side-effect.
Ttom
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 3:52 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 182


JAB wrote:
Hi, nwlegaleagle.  Wellbutrin frequently causes "auditory disturbance", so I imagine that's what's causing the ringing in your ears.
I've been taking Lexapro but just switched to something new and it still rings

ffwife
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 5:55 PM
How do you know you are moving from stage 2-3 what are you experiencing? As for the Wellbutrin, are you on the generic or non generic form? I was on the generic and had horrible headaches and switched to the non generic and then to extended release finally the headaches stopped. Sometimes the fillers in generic drugs can cause some untoward side effects?
April In Paradise
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:03 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 11


It is very common for Wellbutrin or any other SSRI to cause headaches in the beginning until your brain figures out how to adjust to the change the medications are making. Many people stop taking the drugs because of this and other side effects. The best thing to do is to ease into it very slowly. Talk to your doctor, but one way is to get the liquid form and start with a very, very low dose and slowly move up.
nwlegaleagle
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:16 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


ffwife wrote:
How do you know you are moving from stage 2-3 what are you experiencing? As for the Wellbutrin, are you on the generic or non generic form? 
Hi, ffwife. Yes, I am taking a generic, so that must be the problem b/c I've used Wellbutrin in the past without problems, but not its generic.
As for knowing I'm moving from stage 2-3, I spent a week at UCLA Ronald Reagan Hospital in July for testing under DIAN, and was told I was in stage 2. Since then, I have begun to notice some decline (I have always been keenly aware b/c AD gene runs in my family). But just joined a gym, began a Mediterranean diet, and taking other measures suggested on this Board. This Board is a blessing!

nwlegaleagle
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:17 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Many thanks, April.
April In Paradise
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:53 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 11


Let me recommend a specialist. Since UCLA Ronald Regan hospital was mentioned, I found this doctor in Brentwood. He is the one that got me onto a drug like Wellbutrin, plus when I mentioned to him my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, he would tell me what to expect. He is a Neurologist, but is practicing as a Psychiatrist. He is great for the med's and understands Alzheimer's, but probably would be able to recommend someone good...or at least help ease you onto something "with" your doctor.  http://www.lapsychiatrist.com/
April In Paradise
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 8:55 PM
Joined: 12/21/2011
Posts: 11


You are most welcome! I have been through the vicious cycle of medication and it can be quite frustrating, to say the least.
Lisa428
Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 9:25 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


Hi Legal Eagle,

Sorry you are having problems.  Please, speak with your doctor ASAP.

Medications often need to be tweaked in the beginning.  It was the same for me.

Good Luck with all the new things going on!

Don't start worrying too much just yet.  You are doing well.

Remember, STRESS is our enemy!!!!

Please, try to remain calm to keep the stress away

Good Luck and take care.

Peace and Hope,

Lisa


Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, December 22, 2011 2:46 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16187


Legal eagle do you have a formal diagnosis?  Depression can mimic dementia.  What is your goal?  Are you evaluated for depression or evaluated for dementia?  I treated my depression myself without antidepressants, when they only made me worse. 

 

what makes you say you are going from stage 2 to stage 3?

 

Iris L.


JAB
Posted: Thursday, December 22, 2011 12:46 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 740


Just a reminder ... the medical community often uses a 3-stage system, i.e., mild, moderate, and severe.  Those of us on the boards tend to use a 7-stage system.
nwlegaleagle
Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 1:54 AM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Thank you April, Lisa, Iris and JAB! 

My Story: My father was one of 13 children (3 different fathers). Eight or 9 of the children died with symptoms of AD. All were early onset in their 50's, so when I turned 60, I thought I was safe. But at the age of 62, I came to a 4 way stop near my home and completely blanked out on which way to turn to get home. Three or 4 minutes later, I got it. A couple of days later, I went to my doctor and told him of the AD family history. I underwent a battery of tests, including 3 hours of memory lab. It came out normal with no sign of dementia. Six months later at Thanksgiving (2009) at my daughter's house, as I was getting ready to leave I became alarmed and turned to my family to tell them that I did not know where I was. That Monday I told my doctor I had AD and he sent me to a neurologist. She prescribed Aricept (did not tolerate it, now am on Excelon) and Namenda, and ordered genetic testing. Turns out I have the PSEN 1 gene. 

I was practicing law and 5 months later I made the decision to tell my employer, who in turn said because of liability I had to resign. I wasn't financially prepared, but I have no regrets.

I volunteered for three different research programs, including DIAN (Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network). This past July, I spent a week at UCLA getting tested. The PhD who tested my memory kept telling me my memory was better than hers. In the end, the neurologist told me I had MCI, which I take to mean level 2 on the level system spoken of on this board. But I have recently begun to experience problems with recollection, indecisiveness,and inability to sleep longer than 3 - 4 hours a day.  

 

 


Ttom
Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 7:19 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 182


Copied from  www.alz.org  

 

 Stage 1:

   No impairment (normal function)
The person does not experience any memory problems. An interview with a medical professional does not show any evidence of symptoms of dementia.

  Stage 2: Very mild cognitive decline (may be normal age-related changes or earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease)
The person may feel as if he or she is having memory lapses — forgetting familiar words or the location of everyday objects. But no symptoms of dementia can be detected during a medical examination or by friends, family or co-workers.  

 

  Stage 3: Mild cognitive decline (early-stage Alzheimer's can be diagnosed in some, but not all, individuals with these symptoms)
Friends, family or co-workers begin to notice difficulties. During a detailed medical interview, doctors may be able to detect problems in memory or concentration. Common stage 3 difficulties include:

  • Noticeable problems coming up with the right word or name

  Stage 4: Moderate cognitive decline
(Mild or early-stage Alzheimer's disease)

At this point, a careful medical interview should be able to detect clear-cut symptoms in several areas:

  • Trouble remembering names when introduced to new people
  • Having noticeably greater difficulty performing tasks in social or work settings Forgetting material that one has just read
  • Losing or misplacing a valuable object
  • Increasing trouble with planning or organizing
  • Forgetfulness of recent events
  • Impaired ability to perform challenging mental arithmetic — for example, counting backward from 100 by 7s
  • Greater difficulty performing complex tasks, such as planning dinner for guests, paying bills or managing finances
  • Forgetfulness about one's own personal history
  • Becoming moody or withdrawn, especially in socially or mentally challenging situations

  Stage 5: Moderately severe cognitive decline
(Moderate or mid-stage Alzheimer's disease)

Gaps in memory and thinking are noticeable, and individuals begin to need help with day-to-day activities. At this stage, those with Alzheimer's may:

  • Be unable to recall their own address or telephone number or the high school or college from which they graduated
  • Become confused about where they are or what day it is
  • Have trouble with less challenging mental arithmetic; such as counting backward from 40 by subtracting 4s or from 20 by 2s
  • Need help choosing proper clothing for the season or the occasion
  • Still remember significant details about themselves and their family
  • Still require no assistance with eating or using the toilet

 Stage 6: Severe cognitive decline
(Moderately severe or mid-stage Alzheimer's disease)

Memory continues to worsen, personality changes may take place and individuals need extensive help with daily activities. At this stage, individuals may:

  • Lose awareness of recent experiences as well as of their surroundings
  • Remember their own name but have difficulty with their personal history

 

  • Distinguish familiar and unfamiliar faces but have trouble remembering the name of a spouse or caregiver
  • Need help dressing properly and may, without supervision, make mistakes such as putting pajamas over daytime clothes or shoes on the wrong feet
  • Experience major changes in sleep patterns — sleeping during the day and becoming restless at night
  • Need help handling details of toileting (for example, flushing the toilet, wiping or disposing of tissue properly)
  • Have increasingly frequent trouble controlling their bladder or bowels
  • Experience major personality and behavioral changes, including suspiciousness and delusions (such as believing that their caregiver is an impostor)or compulsive, repetitive behavior like hand-wringing or tissue shredding
  • Tend to wander or become lost
  •  

     

      Stage 7: Very severe cognitive decline
    (Severe or late-stage Alzheimer's disease)

    In the final stage of this disease, individuals lose the ability to respond to their environment, to carry on a conversation and, eventually, to control movement. They may still say words or phrases.
     

    At this stage, individuals need help with much of their daily personal care, including eating or using the toilet. They may also lose the ability to smile, to sit without support and to hold their heads up. Reflexes become abnormal. Muscles grow rigid. Swallowing impaired.

     

    Remember:

    It is difficult to place a person with Alzheimer's in a specific stage as stages may overlap

     


    JAB
    Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 1:01 PM
    Joined: 11/30/2011
    Posts: 740


    nwlegaleagle wrote:
    In the end, the neurologist told me I had MCI, which I take to mean level 2 on the level system spoken of on this board. But I have recently begun to experience problems with recollection, indecisiveness,and inability to sleep longer than 3 - 4 hours a day.  

     

     

    MCI is not the same thing as level 2.  It is a betwixt and between diagnosis.  It may eventually progress to a dementia, it may hold fairly stable indefinitely, or in some people, it may eventually get better and even resolve completely.  See:


    http://www.alzcompend.info/?p=225 



    Iris L.
    Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 7:54 PM
    Joined: 12/15/2011
    Posts: 16187


    Anxiety/depression also causes problems in recollection, indecision, and poor sleep.  With these new boards it's hard for me to scan the thread so I can't review your story.  You need a thorough evaluation including 5 hour neuropsychologic testing. 

     

     

     

     

     

    I wrote several long posts about how I pulled myself out of deep depression without drugs, but it's on the old board.  Your anxiety/depression must be addressed and gotten under control. Several members here are dealing with depression which complicates the diagnostic process for dementia. 

     

     

     

     

     

    I don't remember if I introduced myself.  I was a pediatrician before I became a memory loss patient.  I'm age 61, on Exelon patch and Namenda for 2 1/2 years.  I'm fed up with antidepressants, because they make me worse.  That doesn't mean that they don't help other people.   

     

     

     

     

     

    Giving up a professional career is depressing in itself.  No one can relate.  Even the psychologists don't know how to address it.  At least the several that I consulted did not. 

     

     

     

     

     

    Iris L. 


    nwlegaleagle
    Posted: Friday, December 23, 2011 8:56 PM
    Joined: 12/6/2011
    Posts: 3326


    With these new boards it's hard for me to scan the thread so I can't review your story.  You need a thorough evaluation including 5 hour neuropsychologic testing. 


    Thanks, Iris. If you scroll up a few messages you will see my story (nwlegaleagle). I had the thorough evaluation, including the neuropsych test in July. I have the PSEN 1 gene, and understand that if you have that gene, you will develop AD.


    Iris L.
    Posted: Saturday, December 24, 2011 5:33 PM
    Joined: 12/15/2011
    Posts: 16187


    Dear Legal, 

     JAB is the one who knows about the PSEN 1 gene.  She posted several times about it on the old message boards.  I am positive for the APOe 4 gene. 

     

     

     

     

     

     Many members who are already diagnosed with Alzheimer's or vascular dementia are  proponents of Best Practices, which is the way to manage and even counteract some of the symptoms of AD and keep it at bay. 

     

     

     

     

     

    These new boards are so awful I can't review this thread so I don't know if this has already been posted.

     

     

    I relied on the old board so I can't give you a link to a thread about best practices.  But basically, it's taking the prescribed medications, eating the Mediterranean diet including omega-3s, exercise, brain stimulation (learning new things) and socialization. 

     

     

    Don't give up!  Your life is not over! 

     

     

     

     

     

    I don't have access to my link for Mimi S's video but I'm going to search for it online and bring it back for you.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2w9LG3hMlU 

     

     

     

    I put paragraphs in my post but no paragraphs came up so I had to re-edit my post.

     

     

     

     

     

    Iris L.


    nwlegaleagle
    Posted: Sunday, December 25, 2011 12:37 AM
    Joined: 12/6/2011
    Posts: 3326


    Many thanks, Iris L! Just got home from a wonderful family gathering. Still able to drive. Merry Christmas!
    Tonya2
    Posted: Sunday, December 25, 2011 6:03 PM
    Joined: 12/8/2011
    Posts: 33


    Dear NW,

    How nice you had a nice time with family!

    Best wishes,

    Tonya


    Geegee
    Posted: Monday, December 26, 2011 9:38 AM
    Joined: 11/29/2011
    Posts: 514


    Hi NWLE, I'm glad you are still able to drive and that your Christmas with family was Merry.  I think I previously welcomed you to the boards officially!  I too have Alzheimer's and the transfer to this new Messgae board has me a little more forgetful and confused.  ??   I definately know I have read and kept up with your posts! LOL! 


     

    I had tinnitus for many years prior to my diagnosis.  Therefore I have not noticed any changes with prescription changes.  it is just a terrible thing to have to live with.    I hope  you get yours resolved. 


     

    Stick with the best practices and a positive attitude! 

    Happy New Year!

    GeeGee


     


     

      


    nwlegaleagle
    Posted: Monday, December 26, 2011 5:58 PM
    Joined: 12/6/2011
    Posts: 3326


    Many thanks, GeeGee. I'm so sorry for all of you who had to move to this new Boards from the old, and especially sad for those who have not been able to join this one. I'm new, so never used the old boards, though I look forward to reviewing the posts once they are archived here.