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Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease
cjrichard
Posted: Friday, April 8, 2016 7:13 AM
Joined: 4/8/2016
Posts: 3


I am new to this site, however I just recently started a blog about Early-onset Alzheimer's, as my mother was diagnosed a couple years ago at age 52.  I feel that there is a stigma attached to the disease, as if it is something to be embarrassed about.  I do not think that people are educated enough about the topic, so I am just hoping to open some eyes.

https://thejaniceweknew.wordpress.com/


julielarson
Posted: Friday, April 8, 2016 9:00 AM
Joined: 9/30/2015
Posts: 1155


Hi, I enjoyed looking at your blog. I feel there is a stigma related to this disease due to the fact that people wonder what if it happens to me or one of mine.
a_step@a_time
Posted: Friday, April 8, 2016 12:19 PM
Joined: 11/21/2015
Posts: 237


Nice blog!  Glad your mom has a loving family surrounding her.

I Live alone. I undiagnosed early onset dementia. (My parent had it so i know the signs.). Today I messed up date order on a pkg shipment tracking.  I felt so stupid and well "old" when I 'realized' what my problem was on reading the sequence.

II personally had onset after bout of severe flu.  It is so frustrating not getting answers from doctors and being dissed as "getting old".  

AAs far as stigma. Seem all mental illness has stigma.... but I would guess 80% of the population is struggling with something at any given time in life.  We just have something that is interferring with functioning 'Normal'.

In my area, I wouldguess there is more money going to helping people with alcoholism than dementia.


TheSteven
Posted: Friday, April 8, 2016 3:21 PM
Joined: 10/11/2014
Posts: 167


Hi cjrichard,

Have you looked into your mother's mouth for dark mercury dental fillings? If she has them, they may be the source of her ALZ. Your mom was just a four years younger than I was when I was diagnosed. I have since stopped its progression. See http://amalgam.org/education/scientific-evidenceresearch/results-removal-amalgam-fillings/ or

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/02/Sep02/091602/80027dde.pdf


I have more links to this type of information about this in my July 4, 2015 blog entry at http://thestevenalztreatment.blogspot.com


cjrichard
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2016 9:49 AM
Joined: 4/8/2016
Posts: 3


Hey,

I have noticed a long time ago she has darker fillings in her back teeth, but I never really thought anything of it.  How would that go about being tested?


Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2016 1:13 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2856


I would start by using the right terminology. Young Onset Alzheimer’s Disease.

 

And as far as the two step dying. I would disagree with that. A piece of me is lost every day and it goes on until I die. This is the longest grieving process especially for the caregiver. At least mine ends.   


TheSteven
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2016 9:25 PM
Joined: 10/11/2014
Posts: 167


Darker fillings are amalgams that are always 50% mercury which releases 150 mcg of mercury into the body per day, more if she drinks any hot liquids.  As my blog states, you can get her blood, hair and urine tested via https://www.quicksilverscientific.com  Tri-test though you need to have someone draw blood at your doctor's office.  You probably need to contact your them to get an order to draw from your primary.

Alternatively, since you live in the Boston area, like me,  you can go to Groton Wellness 
http://www.grotonwellness.com  which has a phlebotomist on staff who can draw it and send it to Quicksilver.  You would need to use them to remove the mercury fillings any ways since there are only about six IAOMT certified dentists in MA able to remove them properly without giving your mom a bolus of mercury during removal.   

I know there are a lot of links in my blog to hundreds of pages of study info and about 20 hours of video and lectures and lots of books but they are worth reading.


alz+
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2016 8:04 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3555


A Step -

I am interested in your experience of having the flu and THEN feeling the dementia begin.

Seems to be there are some common over the counter flu/cold medicines that are very bad for dementia, even the old one for allergic reactions - Benadryl - is not good for dementia.

I do not doubt there are triggers and your experience seems to have been very clear to you.

 

 


Caring4two
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2016 2:24 PM
Joined: 7/6/2014
Posts: 660


Michael Ellenbogen wrote: 

I would start by using the right terminology. Young Onset Alzheimer's Disease.....

Currently, Michael, if it shows up in medical records or insurance billing forms as a diagnosis, it will be coded and referred to as "Alzheimers disease with early onset" G30.0, so technically this poster's "terminology" is correct. It appears in general discussion literature that either term Is used and accepted. 

Codes for Alzheimer’s disease are found in Chapter 6 of ICD-10-CM, Diseases of the Nervous System.

There are 4 codes in ICD-10-CM:

  • G30.0 Alzheimer’s disease with early onset
  • G30.1 Alzheimer’s disease with late onset
  • G30.8 Other Alzheimer’s disease
  • G30.9 Alzheimer’s disease unspecified

Category G30, Alzheimer’s disease instructs coders to assign an additional code when associated with:

  • Delirium, if applicable (F05)
  • Dementia with behavioral disturbance (F02.81)
  • Dementia without behavioral disturbance (F02.80)
Thorough documentation of symptoms and tests will be required by physicians. Patients suspected of having Alzheimer’s disease are given neurological tests. Also, a CT scan is ordered to rule out the possibility of stroke, brain tumor, or other conditions that may cause symptoms similar to Alzheimer’s disease. For example, if the patient is younger than age 60, and exhibiting symptoms; diagnosis code G30.0, Alzheimer’s disease with early onset will be assigned.


Mimi S.
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2016 4:41 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7035


When I first read Michael's original comment, I thought picky, picky.

But then, The term used helps allay the confusion between Early Stage which is the first stage of the disease for diagnostic purposes and Younger Onset which refers to the age at which a person is diagnosed.  This is usually considered anyone younger than 60 or 65. I can never remember which. By % of cases diagnosed, these are much fewer than the normal age of onset, 65 and older.

In my opinion, the Younger Onset folks are far more proactive in their own care and Advocacy than us older folks.

As long as we know which group is being discussed, I wouldn't worry too much about terminology. We have more important things to try to remember.


Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2016 5:07 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2856


.   According to the Alzheimer’s Association about 5 years ago they are moving to Young Onset Alzheimer's Disease for those under 65 because of the confusion of the other term. The reason for that is because every dementia patient actual goes thru the stage of Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease at the beginning. They can be 90 years old.

 If we are going to write blogs we must be right. The point of dong them is to educate people rather then add to the confusion.


cjrichard
Posted: Tuesday, April 26, 2016 7:49 AM
Joined: 4/8/2016
Posts: 3


I definitely agree, and I am glad to have learned the difference.  Thank you for the clarification.
wendyj
Posted: Monday, May 2, 2016 11:43 PM
Joined: 3/12/2015
Posts: 2


Wow. I personally am convinced a particular medication triggered early onset. I was fine before starting it and within 2 months found my brain function changing...although I'm off it, I continue to progress. It's like looking through a glass window at my old self, but unable to tap into it..
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, May 3, 2016 12:14 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16327


Welcome to our online support group, Wendy.  Feel free to start your own thread by clicking on the "Add Topic" tab on the main Younger Onset board.


How are you doing now?  May I ask, how were you diagnosed?  Are you on any memory medications? How old are you?  Are you working?   


Do you have any questions for us?  We try to help each other out.


Please keep reading the threads, and keep posting.  We are here for you!


Iris L.


llee08032
Posted: Tuesday, May 3, 2016 7:49 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


Welcome Wendyj,

Please do tell us about your experience with the medication. Thanks for joining us.


Mimi S.
Posted: Tuesday, May 3, 2016 8:43 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7035


And Wendy,

This is a great place to let your fears and thought out. 

Do find out about the Best Practices many of us are involved with.


llee08032
Posted: Thursday, May 5, 2016 7:23 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


Michael,

It is important that the early stage dementia is distinct and distinguished from young-onset dementia. It can be very confusing for persons with little knowledge about dementia and there is already too much ambiguity and lack of awareness surrounding this disease.


alz+
Posted: Thursday, May 5, 2016 8:02 AM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3555


wendyj wrote:
Wow. I personally am convinced a particular medication triggered early onset. I was fine before starting it and within 2 months found my brain function changing...although I'm off it, I continue to progress. It's like looking through a glass window at my old self, but unable to tap into it..
Possibly the medication you took was contraindicated for a brain condition you did not know you had, which made it feel worse.
I do not discredit the sense people have of dementia increasing after a flu or other illness or because of trauma or wrong meds.

In my Dad's case he suffered a huge emotional trauma before symptoms took off, as did I.


Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Thursday, May 5, 2016 8:26 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2856


 I do not think that is a valid term llee08032. Dementia is not a diagnosis.

 


llee08032
Posted: Thursday, May 5, 2016 9:42 PM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


Michael,

I think my first sentence came out backwards and I meant to say the early stages? 


Iris L.
Posted: Friday, May 6, 2016 12:36 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16327


Some neurologists may diagnose "Alzheimer's Disease" when the patient has no other medical illnesses that might contribute to the dementia, and some may diagnose "dementia" when there are other illnesses that might contribute to the deficits.

2016 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code F03.90  

Unspecified dementia without behavioral disturbance

    2016 Specific Code Adult Dx (15-124 years)

 

  • F03.90 is a specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to specify a diagnosis.
  • Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.
  • This is the American ICD-10-CM version of F03.90. Other international ICD-10 versions may differ.

http://www.icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/F01-F99/F01-F09/F03-/F03.90


Iris L.

 


cg78617
Posted: Sunday, May 22, 2016 12:16 PM
Joined: 5/22/2016
Posts: 3


This post was deleted by the ALZConnected Moderator on 5/25/2016
llee08032
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 8:41 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


You are not supposed to be trying to sell PWD on this board potions and cures. That is not permitted.
Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 10:58 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2856


I do not get upset by post unless they come from scammers like cg78617 who try to take advantage of people who are sick in order to make money.

 


BillBRNC
Posted: Monday, May 23, 2016 11:20 AM
Joined: 12/2/2015
Posts: 1018


Michael Ellenbogen wrote:

I do not get upset by post unless they come from scammers like cg78617 who try to take advantage of people who are sick in order to make money.

 Well said, Michael.

 



llee08032
Posted: Tuesday, May 24, 2016 7:27 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


I wonder if she tried to slip this in on the CG/CP's also? I will report the post.