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disability questions
Horse Lover
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 9:02 PM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


I'm considering applying for disability.  Has anyone on here done it by themselves?  I really don't have the money to hire an attorney.  I'm pretty high functioning and I believe that I could do it, I just would appreciate some advice.
dolor
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 11:39 AM
Joined: 11/9/2017
Posts: 308


If you have a diagnosis of a dementia disease you are likely to get disability. For MCI I'm not sure. 

80% of first applications are denied. Some attorneys, if they decide you have a good case, will take you for free unless you win--and then they'll take their chunk. 

That being said, many people find they need an attorney. Disability has become difficult to get. 


BadMoonRising
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 1:40 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


Step 1: Are you performing substantial gainful activity "SGA" ?

If you are still working and earning more than $1180/month you are performing SGA. If you are performing SGA the analysis stops there and you will be denied.

If you decide to stop working because of your disability, you will easily win based on your medical records. Your case is an easy one.

And yes, MCI counts.



dolor
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 2:30 PM
Joined: 11/9/2017
Posts: 308


BadMoonRising seems to have info about you that I do not. So I will say the paperwork, while long, is fairly simple--and you are allowed to have someone else assist you with the paperwork, and even complete it for you.

 And if you can't obtain your medical records--or even remember who your doctor was years ago--that's okay and they will do it for you.

You will probably be interviewed by a psychiatrist.

I didn't know about the SGA or the MCI, so that is great news!

I do know the ease of getting it varies from state to state. I think dementia diseases are quickly approved--relatively quickly--they tend to be slow, so you may want to start now. They also have deadlines for submission, so watch those.


dolor
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 2:32 PM
Joined: 11/9/2017
Posts: 308


Also, if you are denied, you can appeal numerous times, which is what most people have to do. There may be exceptions to that, hopefully.
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 2:51 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16143


Look up Compassionate Allowance on the alz.org website; this will fast-track your application.


Iris L.


Horse Lover
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 5:27 PM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


Thanks Iris, Dolar and BadMoonRising.  All of you have been very helpful.  I'm still working but I think my time is drawing near to having to leave work.  I'm guessing that I may have a year at best.  Some people are trying to encourage me to leave work now but I like what I do.  I'm really not looking forward to leaving.  Also,my husband is here and I will be home alone.  I tend to get depressed when I'm alone very much. 

Yes Dolar, BadMoonRising did know a little more info about me.  I'm sorry that I didn't include it with my question.  I'm not really thinking clearly right now. This whole idea of going on disability is really messing with my mind.  Someone from the Alzheimer's association is going to meet with me and my husband.  Then she will meet with some additional family members later on to get us all on board the same path.  Anyway, she suggested that I go on disability soon.  She is concerned that I will wait too long and not be aware of when my quality of work declines and then end up losing my job.  My husband is keeping a pretty close eye on me at work.  So, I hope he will recognize when it is time for me to leave before I get myself in a jam. 

Iris, thanks for telling me about where to find the info on compassionate allowance.  That will probably give me SOME relief.  I'm still worried though.  I really don't want to take on the additional expense of a lawyer unless I have to. 


BadMoonRising
Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2018 12:11 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


I went the SSDIB route on my own, but I have significant professional experience in the field and I had an extremely helpful psychologist. Between the two of us, I received an approval within weeks of SSA's receipt of my medical records and his report.

Horse lover, it is possible that your difficulty accepting your diagnosis may unknowingly sabotage your application. If you decide to go with an attorney (with substantial SSDIB experience!) the fees are usually withheld from your retroactive benefits and SSA will forward the fees to the attorney after approval. If you lose, there are no attorney fees. IOW, there is no need for you to pay an attorney upfront to help you with your claim.

If you decide to file your own claim, make sure you include every one of your impairments, including Alzheimer's Disease, Meneire's Disease, Depression (bipolar?) etc.

Sincere question: In your particular situation, why would it be preferable to quit working before you are terminated?



Horse Lover
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 6:46 AM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


BadMoonRising, there are a couple of reasons to leave before termination.  One, I have 6 months that I can claim short term disability and up to 4 years of long term disability while waiting for Social Security to approve my claim.  Second, I have been told that if I go on disability before 62, I can draw the full amount of social security that I would recieve at 67.  If I don't go on disability BEFORE 62, then I will only receive the amount that would be awarded at the age that I have to leave work.  For example, say I continue working until I'm 64 and then can no longer do it, I would receive a reduced amount of social security.  I don't know if I'll make it to 67.  According to my husband, he feels that it would be best for me to leave work before 62.  My doctor pointed out that I can still work part time somewhere and make a little money.  For example, a greeter at Walmart.  It wouldn't be great, but it would get me out of the house.  I get terribly depressed if I stay at home a lot by myself.  I probably wouldn't be able to do anything that has a lot of responsibility, but I would need something to keep me busy. 

Thank you for suggesting that I might not do such a great job presenting my case to social security if I don't believe that I have Alzheimer's Disease.  That's a good point.  Also, thanks for pointing out to list all diseases.  I would have never thought of that.  I appreciate your advice.


BadMoonRising
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 9:05 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


I'm happy to hear that you will be eligible for short term and long term disability.That is certainly helpful.

Unless you intend to cut back and earn less than you are now earning, your disability benefits will not be reduced, even if you apply after age 62.  If you apply for early retirement benefits at age 62, then yes, there will be a large, permanent deduction to your retirement benefit. In fact, if you apply for disability benefits when you have reached age 62, the application will ask whether you would also like to apply for (early) retirement benefits. That's because SSA can pay the reduced retirement benefit while it is processing the disability application. Some claimants really need that money. If the claimant is later approved for disability, the Agency will issue retroactive benefits to cover the difference between the disability benefit and the reduced early retirement benefit. If the claimant is denied disability benefits, SSA will continue to pay the reduced retirement benefit.

Disability benefits continue until the beneficiary reaches full retirement age. At full retirement age, the beneficiary is automatically transitioned from the disability program to the retirement program.

I'll try to explain the disability "freeze" in a later post.

Until then, since you want to continue working, have you considered asking for accommodations that might buy you some more time before you need to leave?

 


Horse Lover
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 5:19 PM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


BadMoonRising,thanks for the info.  I didn't know any of that and it is very helpful.  I work for the state at a prison and they aren't very understanding of people with disabilities.  They say that we have to be alble to work all posts or go off on disability permanently.  By the time that I decide that I can't work my current job anymore, I'm pretty sure that I would not be able to work an administrative job either as all communication is done through the computer.  I know that when my sister got bad, she forgot how to use the computer.  I expect the same will happen to me when I get worse.  Thank you again for taking the time to explain all of this to me.  I really appreciate it.
dayn2nite2
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 8:20 PM
Joined: 6/20/2016
Posts: 1993


  Are you a correctional officer or otherwise working directly with inmates?  If so, I would heed the advice of those telling you to leave on disability.   If you have a slowed or incorrect response to a situation, you or someone else could end up dead.

If you have no inmate contact that’s different, but if you do, I don’t think you get to make the call on when to stop work.  Your disease is evident to others and you stated you can’t believe you have it despite multiple tests and medical opinions.  That suggests you have anosognosia, which is also common in people with dementia.


BadMoonRising
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 9:57 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


Actually, at this time, Horse Lover does get to make the call.

But thanks for playing.


dayn2nite2
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 11:42 PM
Joined: 6/20/2016
Posts: 1993


BadMoonRising wrote:

Actually, at this time, Horse Lover does get to make the call.

But thanks for playing.

So you think it’s a game?  If HorseLover is responsible for safety and deals with inmates, coworkers will have a real knee-slapping good time if there’s a lapse of judgment, won’t that be a fun time.
There are some work environments where dementia is dangerous and a prison would be one.  So would an operating room and a highway.  Good Lord, if someone doesn’t care about themself, fine.  What about other people?  And if it’s fine and dandy and HorseLover gets to say when, then HorseLover should announce to everyone that he/she has Alzheimer’s.  But HorseLover hasn’t..because HorseLover is afraid they’ll terminate.
So....if it’s not a safety issue, why is a secret being kept?

Horse Lover
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 12:34 AM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


day2night2, I don't work directly with inmates.  I work on a computer in a high tower.  I listen to inmate phone calls and read their emails.  Then, I determine when someone is trying to sneak drugs into the facility.  I then turn the info. over to internal affairs and they arrest the civilian and charge the inmate with attempting to traffic.  I was offered a job doing the same thing in internal affairs but it would have been a cut in hours and I can't afford that. Also, I didn't feel that it would be fair to the department since I know that I am eventually going to have to go off on disability.  They need someone who can be there for years to come.  Luckily, they chose 2 people who are also very good at this task and I'm happy for everyone concerned.  If I had taken the job, it would have cut another person out and she really needed the pay raise that went with the job.  She was a secretary in that department previously and she has a little girl at home who she is trying to support by herself.  That raise will make a world of difference for her and her child.

The reason that I haven't told anyone is due to embarrasment.  People who I work with are very judgemental and I will tell when the time comes. My husband and I are very close and he told me that he will let me know when it is time to give it all up. For now, it is only obvious to my immediate family members.  I understand your concerns and I can assure that there is nothing for you to worry about.  I will not put anyone, including myself, in jeopardy.  Thank you for your concern.


BadMoonRising
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 12:46 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


dayn2nite2,

Your post is a perfect example of why someone diagnosed with A.D. should think REAL hard before disclosing the diagnosis to her employer. Apparently even those who should know better remain ignorant about A.D.



dayn2nite2
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 1:26 PM
Joined: 6/20/2016
Posts: 1993


BadMoonRising wrote:

dayn2nite2,

Your post is a perfect example of why someone diagnosed with A.D. should think REAL hard before disclosing the diagnosis to her employer. Apparently even those who should know better remain ignorant about A.D.


I’m not the ignorant one.  I have insight .  Someone who works in a dangerous workplace who has to depend on another person to know when to hang up the gun (assuming you are also armed or have access) is not safe.
Listen to the doctor and therapist.  Your husband also has incentive to keep you working because if you aren’t what is his plan?  He has none.

eaglemom
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 3:04 PM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 2366


The original question ask was if anyone had filed their own disability paperwork. Let's try to circle around to that question.

eagle


Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 4:34 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16143


Horse lover, try to look at your most recent annual employee review to see if you have any warnings.  If so, others are noticing. If so, think about immediate short term disability, allowing you time to apply for LTDI.

Iris L.

 


llee08032
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 7:35 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


BadMoonRising wrote:

I'm happy to hear that you will be eligible for short term and long term disability.That is certainly helpful.

Unless you intend to cut back and earn less than you are now earning, your disability benefits will not be reduced, even if you apply after age 62.  If you apply for early retirement benefits at age 62, then yes, there will be a large, permanent deduction to your retirement benefit. In fact, if you apply for disability benefits when you have reached age 62, the application will ask whether you would also like to apply for (early) retirement benefits. That's because SSA can pay the reduced retirement benefit while it is processing the disability application. Some claimants really need that money. If the claimant is later approved for disability, the Agency will issue retroactive benefits to cover the difference between the disability benefit and the reduced early retirement benefit. If the claimant is denied disability benefits, SSA will continue to pay the reduced retirement benefit.

Disability benefits continue until the beneficiary reaches full retirement age. At full retirement age, the beneficiary is automatically transitioned from the disability program to the retirement program.

I'll try to explain the disability "freeze" in a later post.

Until then, since you want to continue working, have you considered asking for accommodations that might buy you some more time before you need to leave?

 

Greatly appreciate this information exchange. Could you explain the "disability "freeze" ? Thank you, in advance!

 



Horse Lover
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 1:53 PM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


For all concerned, for my most recent annual review I received exceeds and my supervisor said that he wanted to give me outstanding.  However, my employer limits the number of "exceeds" and "outstanding" evaluations and my supervisor was afraid that upper management would kick it back and he would be forced to evaluate me at "meets" expectations.  I'm due for another evaluation at the end of the year.  I expect to get at least "meets" expectations.  I have a new supervisor and he has no appreciation for the quantity and quality of work that I do.  I'm actually doing 2 people's jobs all at the same time.  Day2Night2.  I hope this helps how you feel.  You don't really know my circumstances and you're making a lot of assumptions.  Please stop.  My husband knows me much better than you do and he would never jeopardize anyone.  You have to remember, he works there too.  If I made bad judgements, then he would be affected too.  We do have a plan.  It isn't ideal, but it will work if necessary.  I just don't have a lot of extra money built up to pay a lawyer.  Also, as mentioned by someone else, my question was about whether or not anyone filed for disability themself.  BadMoonRising is trying to help.  You are not and you're being very judgemental when you don't even know me.  That is exactly why I don't tell people that I have Alzheimer's Disease... because other people don't really know me.  They don't even realize that I have the disease.  Only immediate family members can tell.
BadMoonRising
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 9:24 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


Most claimants are helped by the disability freeze. The adjudicator will determine the onset date of the disability and the claimant's earnings record will be frozen on that date. 

When calculating benefits, SSA averages the highest 35 years of past earnings acquired after age 21. If a claimant has no earnings for any particular year, a zero will be recorded for that year. 
Some workers will have zeros or low wages averaged into their highest 35 years because they did not fully participate in the work force for one or more of those years. This could include individuals such as stay at home parents, graduate students, workers who lost their full time jobs or someone who became disabled. 
Social Security will freeze the earnings record as of the date a claimant is found to be disabled. After that date, no years with zero or low earnings will be averaged into the calculation to determine the benefit unless the addition of the lower earnings would benefit the claimant. 

Sorry I'm not able to make that any clearer this evening. I think y'all understand. Here's an SSA link that might help: https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0425501240 


BadMoonRising
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 9:58 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 267


Horse Lover, 

Here's something else to think about. Most long term disability insurance policies require the insured to file for Social Security Disability benefits. This is done because the company wants to offset their losses by claiming part or all of your retroactive social security benefits, if any, and reduce your future LTD payments. IOW, if you win your case, the company will expect to be promptly repaid from your lump sum award.

That said, most of the major insurance companies will agree to pay your attorney fees out of the past owed benefits. However, some companies will expect you to use their attorney or non-attorney representative. If that happens, push back hard. You want someone who is advocating on your behalf, not on behalf of his or her employer. 

I hope this isn't too much information. I didn't think about this when you initially posted and I'd probably remember this again later but...


Horse Lover
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 2:42 AM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


BadMoonRising, thank you VERY much for all of your help.  I'm starting to put together a file to have ready for when it's time to apply for disability.  I'm going to copy your info and put it in the file so that it doesn't get lost.  Since I know that the time is coming, I figure I may as well get as much together as I can so I don't get stressed out trying to find everything all at once.  I'm hoping that will reduce some stress with the process.
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 2:55 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16143


Horse Lover, I'm glad you have had a good job performance review.  If you have not already seen this, I am posting two sites that offer information on job accommodations.  You might see if you can adapt some of these accommodations for your own situation.

 


Accommodation Ideas for Cognitive Impairment

http://askjan.org/media/cogn.htm


also:

Accommodation and Compliance Series:
Employees with Alzheimer's Disease

http://askjan.org/media/Alzheimers.html

 

Iris L.


Addendum:  For some reason, the pages are not found.  I'm sorry, but you will have to google.

I am on a public computer and I don't have access to the links from my own computer.

Iris L.


llee08032
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 5:40 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

Accommodation and Compliance: Alzheimer's Disease

About Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain disorder named for the German physician Alois Alzheimer who first described it in 1906. Alzheimer’s disease damages and eventually destroys brain cells, leading to loss of memory, thinking, and other brain functions. Alzheimer's is not a part of normal aging, but results from a complex pattern of abnormal changes. It usually develops slowly and gradually gets worse as more brain cells wither and die. Alzheimer's is fatal, and currently there is no cure. Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia,a general term used to describe various diseases and conditions that damage brain cells. Symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease progress from mild forgetfulness to widespread brain impairment. Chemical and structural changes in the brain slowly destroy the ability to create, remember, learn, reason, and relate to others.

Early-stage Alzheimer’s is when the problems with memory, thinking, and concentration may begin to appear in a doctor’s interview or medical tests. Individuals in the early-stage typically need minimal assistance with simple daily routines. However, at the time of diagnosis, an individual is not necessarily in the early-stage of the disease. The term early-onset or younger-onset refers to Alzheimer’s that occurs in persons under the age of 65. Younger-onset individuals may be employed or have children still living at home. Early-onset Alzheimer's has been known to develop between ages 30 and 40, but it is more common for someone in his or her 50s to have the disease.

JAN's Effective Accommodation Practices (EAP) Series: Executive Functioning Deficits is a publication detailing accommodations for individuals with limitations related to executive functioning. These ideas may be helpful in determining accommodations.

Alzheimer's Disease and the Americans with Disabilities Act

The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of disability that each person must meet. A person has a disability if he/she has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having an impairment. For more information about how to determine whether a person has a disability under the ADA, see How to Determine Whether a Person Has a Disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA).

Accommodating Employees with Alzheimer's Disease

People with Alzheimer’s disease may develop some of the limitations discussed below, but seldom develop all of them. Also, the degree of limitation will vary among individuals. Be aware that not all people with Alzheimer’s disease will need accommodations to perform their jobs and many others may only need a few accommodations. The following is only a sample of the possibilities available. Numerous other accommodation solutions may exist.

Questions to Consider:

  1. What limitations is the employee experiencing?
  2. How do these limitations affect the employee and the employee’s job performance?
  3. What specific job tasks are problematic as a result of these limitations?
  4. What accommodations are available to reduce or eliminate these problems? Are all possible resources being used to determine possible accommodations?
  5. Has the employee been consulted regarding possible accommodations?
  6. Once accommodations are in place, would it be useful to meet with the employee to evaluate the effectiveness of the accommodations and to determine whether additional accommodations are needed?
  7. Do supervisory personnel and employees need training?

Accommodation Ideas:

Situations and Solutions:


llee08032
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 5:46 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


LIFE IN A CUBE: PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED BY EMPLOYEES WITH COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENTS

Consultants' Corner: Volume 03, Issue 06

Employees with cognitive impairments may experience a variety of difficulties when performing job duties in a cubicle environment. These impairments may be temporary or permanent and may affect overall work performance, including quality of work, conduct, and productivity.

The following describes potential issues that employees with cognitive impairments may face when working in a cubicle environment, some preventative measures the employer can take to minimize difficulties, and accommodations that can be made for employees who have cognitive impairments.

Cognitive impairments may be a result of one or more of the following conditions: Attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Asperger syndrome, bipolar disorder, brain aneurysm, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, epilepsy, fibromyalgia, head injury, learning disability, migraine headache, mental retardation, multiple sclerosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep disorders, and stroke. Other conditions may also result in short- or long-term cognitive limitations. JAN receives many calls asking for accommodation ideas to assist these individuals with performing their job activities in cubicle environments. The following is a summary of these ideas.

1. Employees with cognitive impairments may experience disorganization in their cubicles. This is due, in part, to the compressed work and storage space of a cubicle, which may not be used efficiently or effectively. Setting up files, labeling and organizing work materials, and stocking the workstation with necessary supplies can help employees be more organized.

2. Employees with cognitive impairments may be easily distracted by auditory and visual stimuli. Consider strategic placement of workspaces, e.g., at the end of a row so only one wall is shared with other workspaces. Placing a workspace in a low-traffic area, away from the path to the bathroom, the building's exit, or office equipment can also be helpful. To avoid further auditory distraction, consider placing the workspace away from active areas like the lunchroom, meeting tables, or the copy center. If it is not possible to move the workspace, consider modifying the workspace by purchasing taller cubicle walls, adding cubicle doors, adjusting the position of the desk or chair, providing sound absorption panels, and/or providing a white noise machine.

3. Employees with cognitive impairments may have difficulty managing time, due in part to everyday workplace distractions. Providing noise-canceling headsets may help employees stay focused on the task at hand. The use of timers or watches will be helpful and assist with time management and task completion. An electronic organizer can also be valuable, keeping track of scheduled events and deadlines and providing graphic or audible alarms to prompt moving to the next job task or activity.

4. Employees with cognitive impairments may have difficulty engaging in work-related communication in a cubicle environment. Cognitive impairments can result in poor impulse control, poor judgment, or lack of social skills that create communication problems. These problems can include talking too loud or striking up conversations in the wrong place or at the wrong time. Setting clear rules for communication in/around cubicle spaces that regulate voice control, duration of work or private conversations, and disciplinary actions will help control noise levels, avoid congregations of chatty employees, and extinguish behavior such as calling out over cubicle walls.

5. Employees with cognitive impairments can experience disorientation, which may result in not knowing where to find people, materials, or services in a cubicle environment. It may be difficult to get to public-use areas such as the bathroom, copy room, or conference tables. Offering to show where materials can be found or where places are located, and/or provide verbal, written, or pictorial instructions could also be useful.

6. Employees with cognitive impairments may need to control the temperature in a cubicle environment. Adjusting temperature can increase productivity by reducing distractions and providing consistent physical comfort in the workplace. Allowing personal heating devices or personal cooling devices may also be helpful, as the employee will be less likely to fall asleep, leave work early due to discomfort, or lose work-time because he/she is unfocused or uncomfortable.

7. Privacy is an issue in a cubicle environment for all employees, including those employees with cognitive impairments. An employee might be self-conscious about using accommodations such as speech recognition software or screen reading software. The use of a headset will allow only the employee to hear what is being read from the screen reader. The use of a voice-amplifier will allow the employee to whisper while using speech recognition software. Another option is to use a steno system, which allows individuals to use speech recognition software while talking into a mask. This mask prevents others from hearing what is being said. Designating a private area so that the employee can call job coaches, therapists, or other people in their support system may also be beneficial.


llee08032
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 6:03 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


Iris L. wrote:

Horse Lover, I'm glad you have had a good job performance review.  If you have not already seen this, I am posting two sites that offer information on job accommodations.  You might see if you can adapt some of these accommodations for your own situation.

 


Accommodation Ideas for Cognitive Impairment

http://askjan.org/media/cogn.htm


also:

Accommodation and Compliance Series:
Employees with Alzheimer's Disease

http://askjan.org/media/Alzheimers.html

 

Iris L.


Addendum:  For some reason, the pages are not found.  I'm sorry, but you will have to google.

I am on a public computer and I don't have access to the links from my own computer.

Iris L.

Great resource Iris. Thank you! 

llee08032
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 6:09 AM
Joined: 5/20/2014
Posts: 4406


BadMoonRising wrote:
Most claimants are helped by the disability freeze. The adjudicator will determine the onset date of the disability and the claimant's earnings record will be frozen on that date. 

When calculating benefits, SSA averages the highest 35 years of past earnings acquired after age 21. If a claimant has no earnings for any particular year, a zero will be recorded for that year. 
 
Some workers will have zeros or low wages averaged into their highest 35 years because they did not fully participate in the work force for one or more of those years. This could include individuals such as stay at home parents, graduate students, workers who lost their full time jobs or someone who became disabled. 
 
Social Security will freeze the earnings record as of the date a claimant is found to be disabled. After that date, no years with zero or low earnings will be averaged into the calculation to determine the benefit unless the addition of the lower earnings would benefit the claimant. 

Sorry I'm not able to make that any clearer this evening. I think y'all understand. Here's an SSA link that might help: https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0425501240 

Badmoon, great information. Thank you!

Misssy2
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:43 PM
Joined: 12/14/2017
Posts: 1714


I didnt have the diagnosis of "meatabolism pattern is suggestive of a type of pre-frontal dementia"

It took 2.5 years WITH A lawyer for approval.

For Anxiety, Bipolar and Alcoholism.

I was approved a year ago...and so when I got this diagnosis a couple of weeks ago I looked it up because technically at the time I applied for disability I am sure I had it then because I was struggling at work..with the conduct, the errors, the motiviation...etc....

So what i read from SSA that dementia applications are fast tracked...

If you have it on paper...it will be there when you are ready to leave work...and it will be easy for you to get it.

I wish you the best...and understand....I loved my job...and being home is horrible.


Horse Lover
Posted: Tuesday, September 25, 2018 5:23 PM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 124


I want to thank everyone for their responses.  You were all very helpful.
Bob P
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 10:37 AM
Joined: 10/6/2018
Posts: 3


I did it without a lawyer - with help from my wife.  If your doctor has given you a definitive AD diagnosis, you can even get fast tracked.  AD is one of the diseases that qualify for very quick approval of SS Disability.  Instead of waiting 6 months or more, I received approval in 3 weeks.  For us anyway, it was a matter of visiting the SS office and having all the medical info and doctors diagnosis ready.  However, others may feel more comfortable using a lawyer. Good luck.
dolor
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 12:15 PM
Joined: 11/9/2017
Posts: 308


Ilee08...

Very helpful info!

I despise cubicles and "open floor" work stations. The demise of the personal office is a constant irritant--and a sad statement about work conditions today. 

This will be helpful to employees who have to navigate this set up.

Personal heaters (although often verbotem) also provide great white noise. There are also videos on youtube with up to 8-9 hours of white noise--fans and the like. I've used them in hotel rooms. (They will drain your battery so best if your phone can stay plugged in.)