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Early onset Alzheimers
Monti00
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 11:12 AM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


My Grandma was Diagnose with Alzheimers 10. years ago. She was Born in a small City in morocco and we dont know her real age but we think she is 65 know and her Symptoms started at 53. she had Short Term Memory Loss and was always confused. She also had Depressions but we dont know if this was a dementia Symptom because a lot of People in out Family have Depressions and i think they stardet when her Grandma died at age 103. Im a Bit worried because lately i have read some articles about familial Alzheimers diesease and about the Gene mutations. My grandma has no Family History her mother died at age 65. because of Diabetes and her father died at age 61. he had a car accident. She has 3 Brothers  and one sister. Her sister is 61. and is dementia free. Her Brothers are also all dementia free one of them is 67. and the Other two are 50+. My grandma also had some risk factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, arteriosclerosis and severe overweight. I dont know if she carries a APOE4 gene. Is Early onset AD always familial and if it can occur sporadic is it still more heritable?
Iris L.
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 4:43 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16088


Welcome Monti00.  There is one type of early onset familial Alzheimer's Disease (AD) that is genetic.  But that is not what your grandmother has.  Regarding the APOe4 gene: being positive will increase one's risk of developing AD, but it is not a certainty.  There are many environmental factors that can come into play.    Several recent books address these factors.   For now, eat nutritious foods, exercise, avoid stress, avoid head trauma, and keep your brain stimulated with learning.  

You don't say if you are experiencing symptoms yourself.  If so, you can consult with an experienced medical professional, because there are many medical causes of memory loss , including depression, that mimic dementia, but that are treatable if caught in time.

Iris L.


Monti00
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 7:52 AM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


Thanks for the answer. You said that there is one type of early onset familial Alzheimer’s that is genetic. But is there also a nonfamilial type that occurs sporadic?
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 10:00 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16088


Monti00, the development of most Alzheimer's Disease is sporadic. 
Google presenilin 2 gene and you can learn more.

Iris L.


Monti00
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 11:48 AM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


I know this gene it is a very rare cause of the genetic AD an less than 40 mutations of this gene are known. Why did you recommend me googling it?
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 1:26 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16088


 You asked about familial AD.  Monti00, I could not even remember the name of this gene.  I had to Google it myself.  There's not much I can tell you about it because I just don't remember.  


Iris L.


Unforgiven
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 1:26 PM
Joined: 1/28/2013
Posts: 2543


My 23andMe health results told me I do not carry a gene associated with later onset Alzheimers, which reassured me greatly and explains the pattern of dementia in three of my great aunts (2 with later onset dementia 1 without) and my own mother.  The gene has something to do with the proclivity to create amyloid plaques.  Of course, there are many causes of dementia symptoms, and all must be ruled out or identified for a course of treatment.  The ironic part is that the PWD on this section of the board often know more than the doctors.
Monti00
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 1:41 PM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


ok thanks for your help. I do not notice any symptoms with myself because I'm only 17. I'm just worried about my father that he might inherit the disease. That's why I wanted to know whether all of the early onset Alzheimer's diseases are based on a mutation in a gene or if there are some that are not genetically determined.
Unforgiven
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 3:59 PM
Joined: 1/28/2013
Posts: 2543


Well, you don't have to worry about any sort of dementia yet, but you can take the time to research the issue and live as healthy a life as you can in the meantime. The important thing is for your grandmother to get good medical help, because some dementia symptoms can be from reversible physical conditions.  If not, there are ways of making life much better for your grandmother.  Without a good medical work up it is impossible to tell.
Monti00
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 8:55 PM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


Monti00 wrote:
Monti00 wrote:
Thanks for the advices I’m not worried about myself I’m Just a bit worried about my dad that he might Inherit the disease. I mean he doesn’t show any symptoms know maybe he is a bit forgetful but that’s normal forgetfulness. That’s the reason I want to know if all early onset AD are genetic because some pages say that only 1 of 10 people with early onset Alzheimer’s has the genetic type some say that 50% have the genetic and others say nearly all of them have the genetic type. So as i already said there is no Family History and she had a lot of risk factors. So I’m a bit confused and I hope anybody of you knows if there is also a sporadic type which shares the same traits like the late onset Alzheimer disease.



Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 5:52 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2406


Only 2- 4 percent have the genetic type and most of them get it before the age of 65. It also tends to run in their family. 


Monti00
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 7:17 AM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


Yes that’s why I’m worried because my grandma got Alzheimer’s before the age of 65. It doesn’t run in our family so she is the only one. And there is no helpful article in the internet because every page writes different things.
Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 7:22 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2406


Try to find things related to the DIAN study. You are right about the internet. I also feel the same way at times about this site so you really need to be careful.  
Monti00
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 8:31 AM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


I took a look at the DIAN study and it said that the participation requirements are a positive family history meaning that your family needs two generations of alzheimers disease starts before the age of 60. And that's not the case for us, that's why the whole situation is very complicated I hope only that there is also a non-familial form.

Michael Ellenbogen
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 8:49 AM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 2406


That should then answer your question that it is random if you do not fit the bill. 


Iris L.
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 6:39 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16088


Yes, the majority of Alzheimer's Disease cases are random, even for the early onset patients.  

Iris L.


BadMoonRising
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2019 10:52 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 261


Here's some more info regarding early onset.

"An early-onset variety in 1% to 5% of AD cases is autosomal-dominant and caused by rare mutations in known genes, including PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP. The predominant form of AD is late-onset (age >60-65), which can be familial (15% to 20%) or sporadic. The APOE4 (E4) variant of apolipoprotein E is strongly associated with risk of late-onset AD."

 Also, "Among patients with late-onset AD, the presence of APOE4 may lead to earlier development of symptoms."

    https://www.labcorp.com/test-menu/20331/iapoe-i-alzheimers-risk

The above is from labcorp's website. Nevertheless, EOAD is diagnosed if the symptoms of the disease appeared before the age of 60.


Monti00
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2019 6:57 AM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


Does it mean that 1-5% of eoad are autosomal dominant ore that all cases are autosomal dominant?
Monti00
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2019 1:34 PM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


Data were collected on 202 consecutive patients presenting to an EOD clinic. Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD, n = 120) and early-onset frontotemporal dementia (EOFTD, n = 82) were studied.

The majority of participants, 72.5% with EOAD and 74.4% with EOFTD, did not have a positive family history of dementia. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance was observed in 14.2% of patients with EOAD and 13.4% of patients with FTD. Of those with an autosomal dominant 

pattern of inheritance, 11.8% of EOAD and 45.5% of FTD probands had known pathogenic mutations. Only 1.6% of the total population of EOAD and 7.3% of EOFTD possessed known gene mutations.

Early-onset dementia does not appear to be a strongly inherited autosomal dominant condition. The majority of patients were sporadic. Known mutations were uncommon and do not explain the total autosomal dominant burden.

https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1533317514545825


This Studie says something different.

 



jcalz2019
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 2:34 PM
Joined: 9/2/2019
Posts: 2


I am 57 years old and in June after a full year of testing was diagnosed with EOA. My mother died in 2017 after 61/2 years with Alzheimers. My father is still living with Alzheimers for 9 years now and has around the clock caregivers. I had symptoms as far back as December 2017. I am unable to work and my wonderful wife is my caregiver. She helped me take care of my parents and is now responsible for my care and the sole income provider for our household. I have a lot of guilt for the pressure and stress that has been on her for years for all the care for me and my parents she has lovingly given to us. It is very important as an individual with Alzheimers you have the support of a care giver to help you thru this horrible disease.

I had genetic testing and have  the APOE 3 and APOE 4 gene, I then had a lumbar puncture and my spinal fluid test came back consistent with Alzheimers and I tested on the very upper end of the scale. My neurologist diagnosed me with EOA at this point.

 


Monti00
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 3:46 PM
Joined: 8/12/2019
Posts: 11


Does your parents had early onset Alzheimer’s too or late onset?
jcalz2019
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 4:10 PM
Joined: 9/2/2019
Posts: 2


both parents late onset