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"Alzheimer's victims benefitted by social clubs"
Iris L.
Posted: Friday, October 25, 2013 1:35 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16448


This article appeared in a promotion for the Senior Expo.  Apparently, these patients and spouses started their own group for themselves, the Wild Bunch supper club.

http://ladailynews.travidia.com/SS/Page.aspx?sstarg=&facing=false&secid=138099&pagenum=20 

I posted this article even though is it about a group for couples.  40% of Alzheimer's patients live alone and don't have a spouse or partner.  Personally,  I believe this figure to be higher.  We single patients should just begin to start our our clubs in our areas.

Iris L.



Paul Hornback
Posted: Friday, October 25, 2013 8:41 AM
Joined: 8/9/2013
Posts: 584


Iris, what a wonderfully encouraging article. Thanks for sharing it with the group. Remaining socially active is critically important to our emotional health. I hope that you can start a group like this in your area for singles. If anyone could do it, it would be you!

God Bless, Paul


Mimi S.
Posted: Friday, October 25, 2013 10:31 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7035


As Iris and I both know maintaining our social life is one of our Best Practices. And until the world is convinced, we have to do it ourselves.
Myriam
Posted: Friday, October 25, 2013 1:57 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


I have a viseral reaction to the word "victim". Wishing authors/writers wouldn't use it. I don't see myself as a victim, but rather as a warrior. Just sayin'.  ;) winking
Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2013 12:39 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16448


I agree, Myriam, but that was the headline of the article so I posted it as printed in the article.  I like warriors, or even champions! 

Iris L.

Mimi S.
Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2013 8:58 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7035


Myriam, We're not victims. 

But as I began to close out this thread, I realized that too many people are.

 

They refuse to recognize the symptoms in themselves when an early diagnosis offers the best results can be obtained through medication and lots of work.  Later, their friends and relatives refuse to acknowledge the signs.

So, by the time they are led, kicking and screaming to a diagnostician they also have Anosognosia.



They and their loved ones absolutely know that nothing can be done, so nothing is. They are content to withdraw from the world and  become couch potatoes. When things become impossible at home they are dumped in the nearest Nursing Home. Again, no activities. Sit in the wheel chair grouped around the nursing station and doze the day away.

Those are the victims that don't seem at all affected by all the work the Alzheimer's Association and other similar groups have done.


 


Myriam
Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2013 2:35 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Good point, Mimi. But I wonder whether it's more about fearfulness than victimhood. I know a few people who have anosognosia and when I broach the subject with them, I can see them considering what I said, but then dismissing it and changing the subject.  

 

One is close to me and that person is very accomplished. I believe they cannot fathom it can happen to them, so it's "I'm just getting older, that's all." All are intelligent and strong willed. Don't know if that is a common denominator for those with anosognosia. 


Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, October 26, 2013 7:23 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16448


I wish there were more research done about anosognosia.  It seems to be common but I don't know if it would develop if people were conscious of what was happening with them in the early stages.  I think anosognosia could be avoidable.

On the other hand, anosognosia is not only a feature of dementia, but of many brain conditions.  It may just be part of the nature of brain diseases.

Iris L.