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Lyrica Based Cog Impair or Prog Dementia
CJeanette
Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:24 PM
Joined: 2/13/2019
Posts: 2


New to this and terrified to speak it out loud or write it down.  I was prescribed Lyrica after two back surgeries and nerve issues.  I was taking 1600mg a day for almost a year.  When I stopped, there was no taper....just stopped.  Needless to say, it was an extremely difficult week to get through, physically and emotionally.  I've not been on it for a couple of years, but have started to notice a decline in my memory and some issues with speech.  I was a 911 dispatcher for almost 18 years, so memory was something I was very good at.  I call it 'losing words'.  Random words, in the middle of a conversation or just alone and it being in my thoughts, but when it happens, it's a horribly scary feeling.  Not one of not remembering something, but it just really not being there..just lost.  Just trying to maybe find someone around my age (40) that may be having similar issues, or if anyone knows someone.
Iris L.
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:22 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16187


Welcome, Jeanette.  You're right, many medications can be responsible for memory loss and other cognitive problems.  There are also many diseases and conditions that do the same thing.  Only a thorough and detailed medical and neurological evaluation can determine what is going on.  You can begin with your own primary care doctor to perform the initial medical exam and do blood tests for hormonal problems and other disorders.  Then, you must locate a neurologist who specializes in diagnosing the dementias for further evaluation.  This must include neurocognitive testing performed by a neuropsychologist.

 

You may have a treatable medical condition.  The diagnosis of the dementias is a rule-out diagnosis, after all medical causes have been ruled out.  Because the dementias are rare in people under age 65, it is extremely difficult for doctors to come to that conclusion.  It will be important for the specialists to know your current and highest levels of functioning.  Are you working now?  If not, did you lose your job as a 911 dispatcher?  Please tell us more.  If you can no longer work, you may be eligible for a Social Security Disability Insurance pension.  But that's getting ahead of ourselves.  First the evaluation and the diagnosis.  Hopefully, it will be something treatable.

 

Please keep us updated on your progress, Jeanette.

 

Iris L.


Mimi S.
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:28 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7035


Welcome to our world, Jennifer. I'm so glad you found our site.

I would echo what Iris wrote.
Depending upon what iris wrote, you may be able to skip your GP and head right to a good diagnostic center, usually a large medical center or university with a dementia dept. is the place to go, From your library, ask for any book by Doraiswamy and Gwyther. The first part of the book describes what a believable diagnostic procedure must consist of.  
She is also correct that many conditions can produce dementia like symptoms and these need to be checked out.

 

Do keep us in the loop.
CJeanette
Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 9:57 AM
Joined: 2/13/2019
Posts: 2


Unfortunately I am no longer a 911 dispatcher.  I do work full time in a different position but my memory issues have been mentioned more than once.  I have an appointment next Friday with my PC.  I've started to keep a log of things as I notice them and it's more of an issue than I thought.  When you start to write everything down the list seems to get longer.  My fingers are crossed.  Thank you guys for the response!!!
Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 10:39 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7035


I still feel you need to be seen at a good diagnostic center, whether or not your PCP agrees. 

Before you see your PCP figure out the best place to go. It's usually a large University or Medical Center with a dementia department.