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“16yo Teen Discovered Early Detection of Alzheimer’s (even at young age) Using a Lemon Peel”
DocMartin
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:05 PM
Joined: 3/25/2019
Posts: 6


Hi. Just trying to promote my 16yo daughter's science fair project that she submitted this year - about early detection of Alzheimer's using a lemon peel. She tested it on 51 healthy volunteer subjects, and also did MoCA on them. When I called the local paper and TV stations for potential segment or just put her in the news, I got cold shoulders from these people. I thought to myself, wow these people don't care about any advancements in Alzheimer's disease. Until one person mentioned to reach out to ALZ.org. I was just hoping that someone can write an a news about my daughter's awesome project because she had positive results - people in their 30s, 40s and 50s,, including 1 teen ager, were identified as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) already. But the most wonderful result was, she identified 4 pre-MCIs - which is the purpose of her project. Please let the world know about this! Thanks!

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 10:47 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4545


Good work on the part of your daughter, and shame on just about everybody else.

I cannot help with the media part of it, but I can partially explain the results.  Loss of smell is often one of the earliest signs for cognitive impairment.  Damage is done to oflactory receptors which are g protein-coupled receptors.  After awhile, g protein-coupled receptors affecting sleep (melatonin), mood (serotonin), alertness (dopamine), social recognition (oxytocin), and memory (acetylcholine) are also damaged.

It is also possible that certain aromas from essential oils may partially reverse the damage done to olfactory receptors, as well as allow people with cognitive problems to retrieve certain forms of memory.



DocMartin
Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2019 9:11 AM
Joined: 3/25/2019
Posts: 6


My daughter would really like to publish her research - any recommendation on journals and stuff?

 


Myriam
Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2019 12:29 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Hi, Lane. I've wanted to let you know that I've remained in the early stage for the last 10 years using aroma therapy.  Thank you soooo much!

Myriam 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2019 9:24 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4545


I was excited to see your name, Myriam, and so excited to hear that you are doing well.  I am pleased that you continue to reap benefits from aromatherapy.  Best wishes, always.
Steve3D
Posted: Friday, June 14, 2019 9:55 AM
Joined: 6/6/2018
Posts: 58


Hi, Myriam,

I'm so pleased you've had good results with aroma therapy.  That's great news.

I'm trying aroma therapy for my wife, and of course stumbling around with the most effective method.  As you've had such good results, what exact method do you use?  I guess I'm begging for REALLY detailed directions, sort of like doing the Hokey Pokey.  Do you put your left foot in first?  Use a diffuser?  Wear an amulet with oils?  Take your left foot out?

I know this is an invasive question, but like every other caregiver, my day runs on desperation and my night runs on frustration and tears.  Sorry if that sounds a bit maudlin, but I bet I'm not the only one scrambling for the best way to get things done.  

Thank you for any information you can give, and continued best wishes.  Sounds like you're doing it right!

Steve


Birdies
Posted: Friday, June 14, 2019 4:35 PM
Joined: 7/3/2018
Posts: 53


Myriam wrote:

Hi, Lane. I've wanted to let you know that I've remained in the early stage for the last 10 years using aroma therapy.  Thank you soooo much!

Myriam 

Hi Myriam, 

 

I too, would like to know your protocol.  What oils do you use and when and thru what means?
Thank you!

Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4545


DocMartin, I am still trying to think of where your daughter could publish her research.  I looked up as possible leads stories on the loss of smell as a possible predictor of Alzheimer's disease.  This one from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology looked particularly interesting.


Study Finds Lemons, Lilac Among Top 10 Smells That Predict Alzheimer's Disease

 

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico, Dec. 13, 2004 -- The inability to identify the smell of lemons, lilac, leather and seven other odors predicts which patients with minimal to mild cognitive impairment (MMCI) will develop Alzheimer's Disease, according to a study presented today at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) annual meeting. ..

Inability to identify 10 specific odors (derived from the broader study) proved to be the best predictors for Alzheimer's Disease: strawberry, smoke, soap, menthol, clove, pineapple, natural gas, lilac, lemon and leather.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041220013505.htm

Your daughter's research is important because it indicates the loss of smell for lemon peels predicts even further back the likelihood of developing cognitive impairment.  This would seem like something the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology would be interested in (and they have their own journal).

If this leads nowhere (as unfortunately many things do), let me know and I will try to think of other possibilities.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:39 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4545


And just to add:

Neuroprotective Effects of Citrus Fruit-Derived Flavonoids, Nobiletin and Tangeretin in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease.

Neurodegenerative diseases, namely Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease represent a deleterious impact worldwide. Despite extensive preclinical and clinical research in neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic strategies aimed at the prevention and chronic treatment of neurodegenerative conditions have not been successfully translated to the clinic. Therefore, the identification of novel pharmacological intervention derived from natural products is warranted. Nobiletin and tangeretin are important citrus flavonoids derived from the peel and other parts of Citrus L. genus, and have been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects in several in vitro and in vivo studies...Taken together, these naturally occurring phytochemicals may represent beneficial drug candidates for the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28474543

The loss of smell is often a sign of impending damage to neurons needed for memory.  The chemicals behind various smells are needed to prevent the further death of neurons and to partially restore certain forms of memory.


Larrytherunner
Posted: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 6:56 AM
Joined: 2/26/2016
Posts: 170


DocMartin, going back to the science project, it is great that your daughter is interested in science. My oldest daughter liked science in high school and worked hard to make good grades, and now she is a medical doctor. As for me, as a math major, I taught high school math a couple of years in my younger days before going to work for the federal government.

 

The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is designed to test memory loss. If a young or middle age person scores low in the MoCA, it doesn't mean he or she has Alzheimer's or MCI, or is going to have it. It means that his or her normal memory is well below average. 

 

The loss of the ability to smell certain odors is symptom of Alzheimer's. However it is normal for people to vary in their sense of smell. My wife can smell certain things I can't smell, and I can smell certain things she can't smell. What one should be looking for in diagosing Alzheimer's is a loss of the sense of smell, not how good his or her sense of smell is when they are young.

 

I think the project started off with the wrong assumptions. A science project advisor could have informed your daughter.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 9:58 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4545


I believe that your daughter's science project was based on the right assumption.  All cognitive tests for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease have their limitations, but the Montreal Cognitive Assessment appears to be a relatively decent one:

Is the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) screening superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in the detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in the elderly?

CONCLUSION:

The screening tool MoCA is superior to MMSE in the identification of MCI, and both tests were found to be accurate in the detection of AD.

In regards to smell, the loss of certain smells rather than the complete loss of smell appears to be predictive of the potential development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.  

Nor is it coincidental that the olfactory receptor--which is a g protein-coupled receptor is the one damaged most early in Alzheimer's disease.  The nose is closely connected to the hippocampus and many of the receptors damaged in Alzheimer's disease in the hippocampus are also g protein-coupled receptors affecting such functions as the retrieval of short-term memory, sleep, mood, social recognition, and alertness.