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Just need to talk to my friends (104)
Lorita
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 7:53 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Morning and Happy September!

 The guns are poppin' this morning.  I think they have to stop at sunrise, not sure.  The guy south of us lets people hunt on some of his land and that kind of bothers me.  I've talked to the hunters a couple of times about being careful.  Of course, the girls head for that area in the mornings. 

 Got out early and back in by 7.  Finally saw everyone - they were scattered from the feeder up the south fence.  I checked the pear trees and didn't see any on the ground.  Hope I didn't miss some.  I was really surprised that there was water standing where there wasn't any yesterday.  When I got back to the house I checked and we had .9" in the gauge.  I left the CW out last night thinking it wasn't going to rain so my seat's wet.

 Sara - hope you got back to sleep.  I hate it when I wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep.  There's not a heck of a lot on TV at night either.  

Judith, your lunch sounds so good- bet you all had a nice time.  It could have been the extra fruit that caused the crust not to come to the top.  Did it get cooked through?

 Ron - I'd never heard of mayhaws so googled it.  I bet my grandma was familiar with them and she probably did talk about them and I just don't remember.   Are you familiar with muscadines?  I did hear her talk about them.  I've never seen any but she said they were good and they made jelly and/or jam from them.  I think daddy talked about them, too.  He was raised by his grandparents after his parents passed away. His grandma was Indian and they lived around Braggs, close to Camp Gruber so there were what we call mountains around so there were probably muscadines.

 I was thinking last night about dumplings.  Someone on TV was talking about chicken and dumplings.  Daddy made bean dumplings and Patsy remembers her mother making them, too.  I may try that next time I cook beans.

 I used to have a friend who made a chocolate cake with fudge icing - so good.  But, when you live alone it's hard to  make a cake because you have to eat all of it.  Guess part of it could be frozen.  Mother used to get jiffy cake mixes - just made one layer.  I'll look for that next time I'm in town.  You know, a person could make half of a cake mix.  Might try that when I can eat cake again.

 Well, enjoy the rest of the Labor Day Weekend.


ronald71111
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 9:45 AM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Lorita,  now that you mentioned it, muscadimes is what mom made most of the time into jelly. She was raised in the country a little south of us and we went to visit kinfolk often. The woods were full of muscadimes. You mentioned chicken and dumplings, we just about grew up on chicken and dumplings or Lima beans and rice. I remember when you would ring the chicken neck and pop it off, it still ran around the yard. I also remember the awful smell with the black pot with hot water and the smell the chicken feathers put off.

Ron 


Lorita
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:48 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Goodness gracious, Ron, did you ever bring back memories.  I can remember my grandma wringing chicken's necks in the back yard and watching the chicken flop around.  Could not stand that now.  And, the dogs always got the chicken's feet, remember that?  I can remember sitting out by the smoke house (no longer there and there are lots of  memories of it) picking chicken feathers.  I can also remember the awful smell of the chicken feathers while they wet them to get them off the feathers.  So  many people now have no idea of things like that - chicken comes from the grocery store, not from a white leghorn.   I used to stand by the sink when my grandma was cutting up the chickens - I never learned how to do that, too squeamish I guess.  I can remember her getting the sand or gravel out of the what she called the "craw" - must have been the what?  Not sure.

 I've just come in from emptying three cases of Boost.  I found three cases of it when I moved the things in the utility room.  They expired in 2015 - smelly stuff and it was heavy so had to get it out of the little boxes so I could throw them away.  Glad that's done.  Just put a load of clothes in the dryer so I'm making some progress.

 Talked with Sarah a while ago.  She has had some awful night.  The nurse came in to put her supplement through the feeding tube and the tube was gone.  Somehow it had come out.  They couldn't get the right kind of tube so put in a urethral catherer into the opening to keep it open and will try to get one in sometime today.  Said she'd been x-rayed a couple of times to see if it was where it should be.  I guess they'll have to take her to the OR to put in the tube.  I don't know how she endures all of that.  I sent her some flowers a couple of days ago so she said that was the only thing that was cheery in her room - at least she can look at them.

 I'm going to rest this afternoon, if nothing else comes up.  I have several pairs of socks in the dryer.  I counted them before I washed them but dollars to doughnuts I'll come up one short, always do.

 Ron - do you remember butchering hogs? 


jfkoc
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 11:36 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 17291


Before we turn from baking to butchering.....

https://www.myrecipes.com/how-to/cooking-questions/difference-cobbler-crisp-crumble-buckle

And then can we first discuss making jam....that sounds like a great project and everyone loves that kind of gift. The gifts that have to be worn or displayed are always touchy when you really do not like them....lol

Lorita...I am a big fan of UCSF. Here is what I would follow and what my friend does here

https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/diverticular_disease_and_diet/

No fiber during a flare-up.

It is hard to understand all that Sarah goes through. Do you know when her surgery is? If the hospital is through with construction I will try to be there. 

I had 6 for dinner. Over cooked the chicken and zuchinni. I was in bed and asleep 30 minutes after they left. I can slowly clean up today. Dirty dishes do not concern me. 

Sometime today I am going to locate and buy a carbon monoxide alarm for my deaf ears. A  friend got fumes inside her home last week from her generator not being place correctly. Scary. 

We are still stacking up limbs from the storm. The village next to me (across the street) does not lick up so I have several piles on my yard.

Watching Dorian as it hits Abaco...sustained winds of 160mph. Moving slowly. The worst stom in its' history. While part of the commonwealth, I hope the USA will send help. 

One of  Dick's Red  Ripper squadron has a daughter ( one of the first female Navy fighter pilots) who is involved in a huge animal rescue in the islands. Many are flown to the USA. 

It was started by her mother and really took on a life of its own after the last hurricane. They get as many dogs off the island as they can. I think they all but take them to the airport and ask people to transport on their ticket. One time they found an empty flight and they loaded 100 crates. It is quite a network. Having a bunch of pilots involved helps. Take a look at what  a couple of people have created. 

 

 


Rescue mom
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 12:01 PM
Joined: 10/12/2018
Posts: 999


Muscadines grew wild in the woods where I grew up. A lot of people also grew/cultivated scuppernongs, which were very similar, but different colors and slightly different flavors. Some varieties had very thick skin, others had thin skin. (You did not eat the skin either way).

We made jellies, and tried making wine, but IIRC it was nasty sweet stuff! Mostly you just ate them off the vine, like you would handle/eat grapes. In general, the scuppernongs had more flavor than wild muscadines, which makes sense.

I recall my mothers family chopping heads of chickens and how they flopped. I’d rather not think about that now. Ugh. There was a saying about “people running around like  chicken with its head cut off,” when somebody got wild and crazy

The hurricane had people in a frenzy here till yesterday when it seemed more likely it will sideswipe Fl. Some still warn it could still go straight into land but that’s not expected. I think most people have done everything they can or will until something changes. I’m just worn out from prep and waiting. DH is oblivious, at least not upset.

It’s so sad looking at the Abacos in the Bahamas now with that storm on top of the islands. We used to go to the Abacos a lot. I guess not much will be left. You can build for 120-140 mph wind, but not much can withstand 175-80, except maybe a concrete bunker..


Victoria2020
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 12:09 PM
Joined: 9/21/2017
Posts: 826


jkfoc

On smoke/carbon detectors,  I've been researching-- smoke detectors come in 2 styles - ionization- fast flaming fire- most people have this type of detector.

Other is photoelectric- slow smoldering fires.

So if you have ionization already get a carbon monoxide/photo combo. 

Also there are 10 yr sealed battery types --  no beeping and battery changing  at 6 months, no ladder climbing. Saves money and recycling costs long term.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrOLxh8GuCU


Lorita
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 1:33 PM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Hi,

 Judith, that was interesting about all the different kinds of desserts.  There's another one that wasn't mentioned - a Betty - not sure what it is but I've heard of it.  I really love crisps but I've never been able to make a really good one.  When I was in school our cook made the best apple crisps - truly crisp on top.  Mother made lots of apple strudels and they were so good.  Nothing like mother's cooking,

I've been doing the flare-up diet - eggs, toast, applesauce, juices and not much more.  I'm slowly adding a thing or two at a time.  No pain now, just some discomfort from time to time and if I bend too much, which I did yesterday.  I am drinking OJ with CBJ and Pomegranate mixed in - the OJ is pulp free - the light kind which I really don't like but picked up by mistake.  I'm so wanting a potato chip and pop but I'll wait.  Lots of lemonade and I always drink lots of water.  I wouldn't dare eat nuts or popcorn or even lettuce and I dearly love salads.

 I really like jam better than jelly but haven't made either in years - when there's only one person it's much easier to buy if you find a good brand.  Just emptied a jar of blackberry jelly this morning - hope I have more in the pantry.

Got the clothes out of the dryer and folded but not put away.  Just watching TV and resting today.  Not sure if I'll get the trash down tomorrow - I should since there's so much.

 What does your generator run on?  Natural gas?  Ours runs on propane and is quite a distance from the house so no fumes.  Was your friend's generator close to the house?  I have smoke detectors with the batteries that have to be changed and a carbon monoxide detector.  Felt I might need one of them, especially in the winter, when I use propane, open flame heaters.

 Not sure when Sarah's surgery will be.  After she's discharged this time, she has to go see Dr. D. and they'll schedule it.  For the life of me I don't know why they can't go ahead and do it while she's hospitalized.  You're so nice to offer to be there and I know she'll be grateful.  I think if you're having surgery you'd feel better to have someone there.  I'll let you know. She said they may take her to the OR today to reinsert the feeding tube.

 The hurricane sounds awful and am so glad it's not going to make direct landfall in Florida or anywhere.  Those poor islands really have it bad during hurricanes - such awful destruction and no place to go to get away from them.

 So good that you can relax quickly.  Right now I'm looking longingly at the divan - Barclee's over there asleep right now.  I'm trying my best to not let dishes pile up.  It's the silverware that goes before anything else.  I try to use paper plates as much as I can.

 So great that they're doing something to help the animals who can't help themselves.  I feel so sorry for all the wild animals in the Amazon fires.  I know so many of them will lose their lives.  I watch lots of nature and animal shows and it's awful how many species are endangered or have gone extinct - all because of deforestation and destruction of their habitats and also poachers. 

 Rescue Mom - I bet you are worn out from hurricane preparation - can't imagine having all that apprehension and stress that comes with it.  I hope it's not as bad as they originally thought it would be.  We have tornados here but even with all the destruction they cause they're short-lived whereas the hurricanes can last for hours - either one is awful.  Guess all parts of the Country have their destructive things.  Are you on the coast? 

 I've never heard of scuppermongs and have never seen muscadines.  Both sound good.

 Victoria  - those smoke detectors that don't have to have battery changes sound wonderful.  Drives me nuts when the battery starts to go and they start beeping.  I always forget to change the batteries until this happens.

 Okay, I'm thinking I'm going to succumb to the call of the divan.  Back later.


ronald71111
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 2:37 PM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Lorita, yes I remember butchering hogs, not a pleasant memory.  My dad was raised in Pitkin, La. which is close to Fort Polk. I was probably around 5 when we went down for a visit and they butchered a hog. Dad called me over saying they wanted to see how long the curly tail was. He pulled the tail out straight, told me he wanted to see if it was as long as my finger, put my finger along side of the tail and shoved my finger forward. You can guess where the finger ended up! I didn't think it was funny then or now but dad and my uncles did. Shortly after that my brothers made a seesaw with a old board and a couple of cans in the center. The cans gave way, I took a tumble, a nail hit me between the eyes. Country Dr stitched it and still have a bad scar. 

Ron


Sweetwater
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2019 5:57 PM
Joined: 10/6/2016
Posts: 183


Lorita, Velma is 20 miles east of Duncan on Hwy 7. Honestly, I will have to say that I do not miss living in Oklahoma except for the earlier Spring there compared to the Spring that here can last into June. Sweetwater.
Sayra
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 6:06 AM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


Suppose to be in low to mid 70s all week.  We had an inch of rain yesterday.  Should not have to water this week and my fall crops will be happy.  Most of it is looking nice.

Have the same chicken and hog butchering memories as you guys.  Miss those smoked hams and red eye gravy.  Also had rabbit and squirrel at grandmas.  The neighbor man hunted and gave it to them.  They were very poor so pretty sure it helped them out a lot.

Hope all of you have a peaceful day

 


ronald71111
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 7:09 AM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Sayra, you mentioned squirrels which brought back more memories! One of my aunts was cajun and mom learned a lot of true cajun cooking from her. (A lot of folks thought if you was from Louisiana you were cajun; not true, us from north Louisiana were considered just a little bit on the yankee side). Anyway, we would at times have chicken and sausage gumbo, but when dad went squirrel hunting, we would have squirrel gumbo. My sister would always grab the squirrel head and suck the brains out. She said it was good but I never tried it. Gumbo was a treat that was not on the table often, I believe it was because the roux took so long to get right. I buy the package gumbo mix but it's not as good. 

Ron


Lorita
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 8:53 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Morning,

 Just got back from taking down the trash.  Couldn't decide if I wanted to lift all of those sacks or not but I got it done except for one small sack and a Styrofoam  box that blew off the PU.  My left side hurts from the lifting but I won't lift anything else today.  Need to get into town Wednesday morning for creepfeed, mineral tub and anaplas blocks plus some dry catfood for the kitties so I'll rest between now and then.  I'm pooped.

 When I first woke up and it was light enough to see outside it was so foggy you couldn't see anything but it lifted enough by a little after 7 so I could see the girls. Four little ones were in the creepfeeder.

 Ron, it's a wonder a lot of us made it through childhood into adulthood.  Charles used to tell me things he and his sister did when they were growing up and I'd always tell him that. 

 Hope today is good for you and Lou - bet there's another one of those peanut butter cakes on tap for this week.

 Sweetwater - I'm not too familiar with that part of Oklahoma but when Charles and I got married his mother and step father and one sister and her family lived in Duncan.  That's where I met his whole family - scary but it turned out I liked every one of them.  A few years later we met all of them and his brother at Clear Creek Lake and camped out for a couple of days.  Charles and his brother went out on a small boat to fish and a storm blew up and caught them on the lake.  They were able to make it to shore - his step father tried to help pull the boat in and it kind of ran over him. 

 Sara - we had a smoke house where daddy would cure the hams.  I can still remember them.  Also had a home-made shower in one side of the smoke house (the hams were in big boxes - salted down.  Daddy put a wire from the ceiling with a bucket with holes in it hanging from the wire.  We'd fill a bucket with warm water, pour it into the other bucket with holes and shower.  That was before we had an inside bathroom. 

 Glad you're going to have cool weather this week - it's going to be in the mid 90s here with a heat index over 100 each day.  Wednesday is supposed to be a couple of degrees cooler so I'll try to get into town that day. The rain will do so much more good for your plants than watering them yourself.  Our grass is so pretty and green now after our rains.

 I vaguely remember eating rabbit one time.  Daddy was not a hunter so that may have been a one-time thing.  Never ate squirrel.  Ron, what your sister did sounds awful but each to his own, I guess.  I can remember after butchering hogs there would be a bowl sitting by the kitchen sink with brains in it, covered with water.  I couldn't stand to look at it so if there wasn't a saucer on top, I put one there.  Mother and daddy ate them scrambled with eggs.    Sara - I don't remember eating red-eye gravy but my parents and grandma did.  I do remember we used to have a lot of boiled potatoes and instead of using butter we'd use bacon grease on them when we mashed them.  Always had a container of bacon grease on the stove.

 This has truly been a walk through memory lane - so many things that are tucked away in our gray matter that can occasionally come out when we're reminded of things that happened years ago.

 Haven't talked with Sarah this morning.  Since it's a holiday they may wait until tomorrow to reinsert the feeding tube.  I'm going to talk with the nurse today to see if a social worker can see Sarah while she's there.  Maybe there's some kind of program where someone could come in daily to check on her. 

 Already had my grape juice so it's time for hot tea and something for breakfast.  You'd think I'd be losing weight not eating the chips and sweets but have only lost a couple - at least that's better than gaining.   Back later.  Enjoy Labor Day.  The Great Raft Race is going on in Tulsa on the Arkansas River - big thing for Labor Day.


Lorita
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 9:30 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Hi,

 Just thought of something else - do any of you all remember your family making their own lard?   I do.  Daddy would butcher the hog and  then put the fat in a big, black pot, over a fire, and render out the fat.  At the same time making cracklins.  I remember in the pantry a big, lidded can sitting on a little stool in the corner where the lard was stored.  Everything then was made with lard but I can remember when they started making Crisco or at least when we heard of it.  Grandma used to make biscuits using the lard and they were so good.  I still have her pan she mixed up the biscuits in and I think her rolling pin.


Sayra
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 2:59 PM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


Have never had gumbo.  We ate red eyed gravy on boiled potatoes, delicious.  Never ate that part of a squirrel either.  Grandma fixed what she called souse.  It was horrible looking stuff.  Believe they used the head someway.  Never tried it, not sure how they ate it.  She did render her lard and fix cracklings.  I knew they were special because she kept them hid and never offered me any lol.  The only reason I even knew they existed is because my aunt who was probably 50 -60 years old at the time,  came in the kitchen,  we were the only ones in there.  She knew grandma had to have some and she sneaked around  and found them.  She ate one and did not give me any lol.  She called it a cracklin and it was the first and only time I heard them mentioned.  Grandma made the best sausage I’ve ever eaten.  Can remember watching her make it.
ronald71111
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 4:11 PM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Yes I saw grandma make lye soap! I believe she somehow used ashes from the fireplace and boiled it, which made the lye and then added lard, stirred it forever and ended up with the soap. Also, made crackling cornbread all the time. They found all kind of us for fat.

Ron


jfkoc
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 5:39 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 17291


Thank  you Chicago...lol
Sweetwater
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 6:52 PM
Joined: 10/6/2016
Posts: 183


My grandparents in Alabama made souse meat. I was just a kid and was never brave enough to try it because it did not look appetizing to me. It was pickled, gelatinous, and I believe made from pigs' feet. My grandparents also ate pig and, or, calf brains cooked with scrambled eggs.  As much as I can recall, chitlins were made from pig intestines and fried pig skins were enjoyed by all. (even me) On a lighter note, my favorite food made by my grandmother in Alabama was canned pickled peaches. They were peeled, whole with pits, sweet and a beautiful pinkish color in quart jars. I can see and taste them now. Sweetwater.
ronald71111
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 5:21 AM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Shame on you Sweetwater, chitlins is a memory you brought back to my sense of smell. LOL. I can remember grandma over the stove boiling chitlins and after the smell hit me, I couldn't get outside fast enough. 

How many of you took a bath in a large galvanized bath tub, had the experience of a outhouse with catalogs instead of toilet paper,  or dropped a bucket down the well to bring up some of the best tasting water anywhere. Good memories are great but I also recall how old folks were treated! This dreaded disease of alzheimer/dementia was not understood and the older people were either senile or lost their mind. They were usually just put in a corner to themself and had little or no interaction with others.

Memory lane is nice every once in a while to remind you that your life has always been full of good times as well as bad!

Lately Lou has been obsessed with dying. She is constantly telling me she is afraid she's dying and is only calmed down after I take her vitals. I tell her we all start living the day we're born, but also start dying that day. The amount of days/weeks/months/years we have, it's all in God's hands and he will be waiting with open arms when our time comes. 

Ron


Lorita
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 8:11 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Morning,

 Gosh, Judith, you mean you're glad you grew up in Chicago instead of in the country  where you'd have participated in or observed all of these not so nice, sometimes, things?  You just don't know what you missed.

 Sara - we never had souse either - I could not have eaten that at all.  I did have an uncle who loved pickled pig's feet.  I think you can buy them in stores - not that I'm looking.

 My mother loved pickled peaches and they were so pretty in the jars.  Did you all ever make pickled okra?  Mother did and loved it.  Can't say I did.  Patsy's dog, Zelda, will eat pickled okra. 

 Never had chittlins either.  I've heard my grandma talk about making lye soap but we never did or at least I don't remember it.

 I can't remember what we did about bathing when it was winter and before we had a bathroom - probably the galvanized tub.  And, the outside shower in the summertime.  Ron, the catalogs were great - you could look at the things in it and then use it for the other purpose.  We only did this when we ran out of TP.

  Doing all this stuff was normal for us - everyone did it so we didn't think anything about it.  Those were the good old days, for sure.  Nowadays kids have no idea where their food comes from, unless they live in the country.  Everything, to them,  comes from the grocery store.

 Ron, we've all heard about the aunt or some relative locked in the attic.  They probably had alzheimers and that was the only way they knew to keep them safe.  Some changes are for the good and I'm not so sure about the others.

 You know, Ron, I don't know if Lou watches TV much but in the later stages I had to be very careful of the kinds of shows Charles and I watched.  Also had to stop watching National News programs and sometimes even the weather.  I guess it's like us getting completely immersed in a good book or movie - it seems like we're there and is probably the same for them but to them it's real.  I think you're doing the right thing with Lou.

 I went out to see the girls just at dawn this morning - a little bit of fog around.  Some of the babies were in the creepfeeder but most of the girls were in what we called the hog pasture and the field where we raised watermelons - finally got a good count.  I took a stool with me so I could be up high enough to level out the feed in the creeper.  For some reason they always empty the left side, must let the feed out better,  so I think they'll have enough for a couple of days.  They had a little bit of an anaplas block so backed the CW up to the feeder, took the wrapping off the block and pushed it into the feeder.  I'm trying not to lift anything today.  My left side is really sore and I'm thinking/hoping it's from lifting all those heavy trash bags yesterday.

 As I came back by Sweet Pea I noticed that Billy the Bull (her baby a couple of years ago) was grazing right by her side.  He feels secure when she's around so he stays pretty close to her.  I fed the cats and when I came back to the yard I noticed Sweet Pea was standing outside the gate looking at the pretty grass in our parking area.  So, closed the gate to the main road and let her in - Billy came, too.  I'm glad to let them in to eat the grass because it would just be mowed and wasted so they can get the good of it and it's easy grazing. 

 Sarah, last night, said she thinks they're going to reinsert the feeding tube this morning.  I hope they do a good job - she's had so much trouble with it.  She's been in contact with Todd and knows that he's taking care of the house and pets.  We had a really nice visit - first one in a few days.    Didn't get to talk with Patsy - if she's asleep Jack will not answer the phone - I'll talk to her today sometime.

 Need to get into town early, early in the morning to get feed, anaplas blocks, mineral tub and a few groceries.  I like to be in town when the feedstore opens, otherwise, it can be hard to back up to the loading dock because of so many trucks - they're a busy place.  Really the only feed store within quite a distance of us.  The one we used to use in Muskogee closed years ago so all their business went to this one and I think there's one in Stigler - quite a ways from here.

  Need to find something for breakfast - maybe cereal this morning and, Sandy, an egg sandwich later today. 

 Back later.


BethL
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 9:51 AM
Joined: 3/25/2015
Posts: 556


I really enjoy this thread! Thanks, Lorita, for starting and maintaining it. You truly are the heart of it. Glad to read about what others are doing as well. It's fun to read about childhood memories...I grew up in a small town but had relatives who farmed and I do remember chicken butchering. Otherwise, my experiences are rather tame compared to some of yours. I am a great fan of the Laura Ingalls Wilder books and, even though they are novels, they show a lot of what life was like back in the 1800's and early 1900's. Amazing that Laura went from the days of riding in a covered wagon to the days of automobiles. Our lives are much easier than Laura's parents. They had to make much of what they used, grow much of what they ate, make their own butter, dig their own wells by hand, wash clothes without even a wringer washer, let alone an automatic washer.
Fischie7
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:10 AM
Joined: 7/27/2016
Posts: 178


I have even more appreciation for what you do, Lorita, after binge watching "This Farming Life" on Brit Box.  The Scottish series follows 6 farming families for a year and was such an eye opener to me a city slicker.  The farms raise dairy cows, sheep and cattle and you can see the job never ever ends, days, nites, weekends and holidays...It makes the viewer appreciate the hard work that farmers do.  I now understand when Lorita talked about pulling calves means!!!
jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 11:18 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 17291


No doubt about it. This is an educational thread. When Lorita first started. We learned MH, CW, Creepfeeder, Anapol????block, pulling calves , feeding calves, wolves, snakes, ticks, hoses and connectors, empress trees and other regional vegetation, storm shelters, mules, breds of dogs,.

Home made remedies plus some cutting edge medicine and some of the best common sense tips for making life easier.

We have learned a lot of USA geography as well as Australia and Mexico.

And food????????? How many easy make, mother's favorites and work arounds.


Lorita
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 12:53 PM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Hi,

 Thank you ladies for the sweet words.  I thoroughly enjoy this thread - getting to meet everyone and learn about their lives and different countries and like Judith, said different kinds of food and how to make them.  When I first started the thread I was in desperate need of advice and just someone to talk to and be there when I needed to converse.  At that time I was dealing with both Charles' new condition and a little bit later also with my sister's.  I had no one to talk with about what to do, how to act, everything.  I found lots of wonderful advice and friendships that have endured all these years.  People come and go and some of us stay.  I've known Judith for many years - never have met her in person but we almost met several years ago when we took Barclee to OKC for eye surgery but Judith was ill at that time.  She has helped my family so much, going to doctor's appointments with Sarah, visiting her in the hospital, checking out places where we might place my sister and so on and so on.  Good friend, she.

 We've all been through so  much together, caregiving and the aftermath of losing our loved ones.  Maybe you all have learned some things from my posts and I've learned so much from your posts, too.   It's a safe place, as someone said not long ago, to come and just be - a respite from the throes of caregiving and all the problems it brings.  A place to talk about things of interest to us and, hopefully, to others.

 I'm glad my mundane life can be of interest to anyone - to me it's just a way of life, what I've always done, especially since Charles and I retired in the 90s.  I'll do this kind of things until I'm no longer able to carry on.  Sometimes that feels like it won't be too far away.  The animals come first, whether I feel well or not, and that will continue.  Everyone out here puts their animals first in all kinds of weather - heat or cold.  It's good that we can enjoy each other's company and just be friends.

 I just went out, again, to see if Sweet Pea wanted to go into the barn.  She did and so did her baby, Billy the Bull.  Ruby's laying in the lot just west of the barn in the shade.  It's hot out there.  I'm so tired of hot weather.  Just watch, in five months I'll be complaining about the cold weather and wishing for spring.  Never satisfied.

 I did talk with Sarah and her nurse.  They're trying to get a time to get her on the surgery schedule for feeding tube replacement.  Has to be soon because the urethral catheter they put it over the weekend is stopped up and even Coke wouldn't open it.  She seems fairly content, even with her pain, to be there.  They did broach the subject of a NH to her yesterday.  Not a good thing for a person so young.  I've left messages for the social worker to call me hoping something can be worked out for more home visits instead of placement.

 Also talked with Patsy.  She's still very sick even with medication the doctor gave her Saturday.  She has to go into town today to the Podiatrist but on this trip Jack can also pick up his new glasses.  Hate for them to have to go when it's so hot.

 The hurting in my side has somewhat subsided with the help of a heating pad and Acetaminophen but the costo has also flared again - guess that comes from the lifting.  When Charles was here he did most of the heavy lifting - just one of the many things I miss not having him here with me.  I'm leaning against the heating pad now and I'll stay here for a bit.  Need to shampoo my hair a little bit later.  I remember when I had very long hair, down to my waist, I'd shampoo it and go outside in the heat and it would be dry in no time flat.  Not going to do that today.

 Beth, Little House on the Prairie was always one of my favorite TV shows.  I've never read any of the books but I'm sure they're good.  I wish that would come back on TV, in reruns, of course. 

 Fischie - is Brit Box a TV channel?  I'd enjoy watching that show, too.  Several years ago there was a show on TV about three ranches in Montana.  It was so good and so very interesting - wish it would be on again, too.  Do you ever watch The Amazing Dr. Pol?  Really a good show and shows what a veterinarian deals with on a daily basis - never knowing what the next phone call will bring.   I led a very sheltered farm life when I was growing up - back then a girl wasn't exposed to many things.  Daddy always told me a sow "found" her pigs, even showed me a hole in the hallway of the barn once when one of our sows had pigs and I asked where they came from.  The first calf birth I saw was after Charles and I got married - can't count how many since then.  It is very anxiety-ridden for me when our cows are trying to calve.

  Better stop and see what I can find for lunch.  I'll be glad when I can eat something besides applesauce, cottage cheese and yogurt.    Enjoy the afternoon.


Fischie7
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 1:23 PM
Joined: 7/27/2016
Posts: 178


Lorita, Britbox is a subscription service that offers many, many British TV shows and series.  Since subscribing a month ago, I've been enjoying Midsommer Murders, Morse, and other long time series as well as the wonderful Gardener's World.  This Farming Life is another of the series as are the British Bake off shows.  Just go to www.britbox.com to get details on how to subscribe/download the app.

 

 


Rescue mom
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 1:50 PM
Joined: 10/12/2018
Posts: 999


Ron, something you said....but first I would love to have some good pickled okra! I loved it, that and pickled peaches and pickled watermelon rind. The okra had to very small though, big pods are tough and stringy. That’s one of the problems with groceries now. They have fresh okra, but it’s huge. Big not always best.

It’s funny how much of These talks bring back my childhood in the country, which is like another world from S. FL. My mother grew up on a farm that sounds so much like Lorita. They grew and made almost everything. (Red eye gravy and country ham, yum!)  She also talked about how she hated hog-killing day. Squirrel yes, brains no. Water had to be drawn by hand from the well. Clothes washed over fire in a big pot.

They had outhouses in to the 60s. One different thing—I saw the cows and critters mating and birthing from as long as I can remember. And, vice versa, I never saw the Little House TV show, but read and re-read all the books.

But I was struck by something Ron said about elders with dementia. I’ve been thinking they had it *better* back then, (barring other health problems we can now treat better),  though it was called “senile” or “hardening of the arteries” (is that a regional saying?). But the end result was the same.

They stayed at home, seems like there was always an “old maid aunt” or some family living with them, or on the property. They were cared for like babies, IME at least. Always in the middle of whatever was going on, maybe not able to “do” much, or as much as before, but not left unattended nor ignored.

Now it seems like families are so spread out, and people live longer with not so many around to help. And everybody working outside the home...


Sayra
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 6:33 PM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


I’ve enjoyed today’s posts.  Never had any of those pickled things that were mentioned. They did pickle other things though corn, green beans, beets, cucumbers, pigs feet, mixed veggies.  I liked all of it except the pickled green beans.

Has been a busy day.  Took mom her groceries, froze green beans, trying some more kraut.  Threw a couple of jars out I made earlier.  Just didn’t seem right.  Making this in a crock with a water seal.  If  it don’t work out I will be done for this year with kraut.  Hope to pickle a few more peppers tomorrow. My day today ran out of hours. 

Bought ground cherries at farm market.  The girl didn’t know what variety they were.  I gave them a try anyway.  Next year want to try raising some called Cossack pineapple.  Don’t think the ones I bought are completely ripe.  Some taste pretty good and others are sour. They don’t taste like pineapple to me so maybe they are some other variety.  Oh well, fun to try new things.

Goodnight 


Lorita
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 7:38 PM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Hi,

Fische, I looked up BriitBox - so many shows.  I may consider that this winter when I can't  get outside as much.

 Rescue mom - you're so right about the okra.  When I was growing up I picked a lot of okra and really got itchy if I wasn't careful.  Most of the time we had fried okra which was delicious with brown beans and cornbread - can't forget the onion.  After Charles and I got married we also had okra in the garden but we ate it steamed or simmered.  We used little 2-3" pods, added just enough water to barely cover along with a splash of vinegar to keep down the slime in case a pod broke.  We simmered it until it was just tender - so good like that.  I haven't had okra in years - never see it in our grocery store. 

 I also remember the water buckets for the well - long, slender buckets.  I may still have one somewhere in the carport.  We had a well; then our neighbor drilled one and it went into our water vein so we didn't have as much water.  Daddy and one of my uncles dug a cistern that held the water off the house and carport.  They switched between the well and the cistern.  I can remember how cold and good the well water was.  It was hard but we got used to drinking it.  Then, they had a pond made fairly close to the house so they could use that water in the bathroom.  We didn't have city water until 1995.  We had someone dig the water line - 1/4 mile and Charles laid the pipe.  We had measured how much PVC it would take and had 2 ft. left over when we finished.   Sometimes I wonder how in the world we did all that work -  much younger is the answer I guess.

 Sara - I've never had ground cherries.  I've seen the seeds but we never planted them.  What do they taste like?  Do you have a farmer's market or just the grocery store?

 I also remember pickled beets.  Really liked them.  They'd cut off the green part, leaving a couple of inches so they wouldn't bleed, then cook them in the pressure cooker.  Most of the time it was my job to peel them - I liked that, just had to turn them around in your hands and the peeling would come off.  Mother made the best pickled beets.  Patsy tells me that Atwoods has an Amish brand that's really delicious.

 I took Stormy with me to see the girls this afternoon.  I stopped the CW and got out and several of them gathered around it looking at him.   He didn't react so that's good.

 Better stop for now - my tennis match I wanted to watch is on.  Sleep well.  Goodnight, Sara.

  


Sayra
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 5:38 AM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


We have a large Mennonite community.  They have several different little markets.  Some of the ground cherries are sour, some are sweet but really can’t describe their flavor.  They do not taste like pineapple, which supposedly the Cossack pineapple do.  Have seen seeds for three different varieties .  

I also remember wells.  Both of my grandparents had them.  One was close to the house but at the other grandparent you had to walk over the yard, which was a hill, then over a bridge, then down a path.  Not too bad in summer but not so nice in winter.  Know one of my grandparents had an outhouse in the 60s, think both of them did.  A dam took one of my grandparents home so they got to build a new house.  My dad put a bathroom in the other one.

In the part of eastern Ky where I’m from people built houses in some strange locations.  My grandparents built their house way off the road. It was back in behind another relatives house, across a creek that was always flooding, no bridge, just threw a piece of wood between two trees.  I hated going there, it scared me.  My other set lived across a creek too but they were up on a hill so no flooding and they had a nice bridge.

 


ronald71111
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 10:32 AM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Just back from VA and naturally more meds to take. Wasn't overly concerned about elevated psa, said most men my age will die from something else before prostate cancer. Just gave me medicine to help shrink the prostate and one to relax bladder. 

Speaking of okra, I remember we had it all ways you could think of; fried boiled, pickled, etc. I remember mom even boiled it in with the peas, which I didn't care for because it was slimy. Anybody remember churning butter. Grandma would sit for hours going up and down with the stick just for a small amount of finished product. It sure was good!

Okay, tommorow is new primary care Dr., hopefully this one is better.

Ron


Sayra
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 11:11 AM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


Oh yes, I have a churn and a stick sitting in my kitchen lol.  It is my grandmas.  I have my aunts butter mold.  Both are in really good condition.  It is illegal in Ohio to sell raw milk so the only way I will ever get to put them to use is if I can find somebody I know with a milk cow.

Butter was ok. What I really liked was the buttermilk.  Nothing like what you buy at store.

Met the man who moved in next door.  He is cutting the bushes down in front of the house.  States they will be having perennials and herbs.  Is going to have a garden, fruit trees and blueberry bushes in the back.  Know he knows something about growing things because he told me he had been figuring out the sun patterns.  I feel like I won’t be the odd ball any more here.  I’m looking forward to seeing what they do.  Hope they will be nice neighbors.  


Lorita
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 11:35 AM
Joined: 12/18/2011
Posts: 10710


Morning,

 Ron, sounds like you and I both saw doctors this morning.

 I woke up about 3:30 and only slept a little after that.  Couldn't decide about going into town but decided I would - glad I did.

 Left home at 7:20 and got home at 9:20.  Very productive trip.  I stopped by the grocery store first and got what I needed. I have several of those insulated bags so no worry about milk, cottage cheese or yogurt.  Then, on to the feed store.  Had them put the 40 lb. of catfood in the back seat of the PU so I wouldn't have to lift it into the car and it'll be handy to feed the cats in the PU anyway.  

 As I came back through town I thought I'd stop by the doctor's office in the off chance I might get to talk with him a minute.  The receptionist took my chart back to him after I explained I didn't have an appointment but had had a flair and just wanted to talk with him a minute to see if I needed more Flagyl.  I only waited about five minutes, got the whole treatment, TPR, BP and weight (which I would liked to have skipped).  He examined me and said he thinks it's a muscle strain or pull - not continuing diverticulitis.  For some reason, probably because I was hot when I got there and had been running around my temp. was elevated so he did a CBC which was normal.  No infection, no more medicine - so good.  Visited a bit with him about his vacation to Eastern  Europe.  He's four years younger than I and he also says he's finding things he can't do that he did a short time ago and it makes him angry.  Good that I stopped by, otherwise it would have been another trip into town in this awfully hot weather. Right now it's 88 degrees with no wind and very humid.

 One more stop at Atwoods for a blue mineral tub and home.  So glad I went and got all of that done.  Stormy and Sheena stayed in the house - too hot for them outside.  He was thrilled beyond belief that I was home - lots of sweet kisses and literally hugs from him.  I'll pull the mineral tube out of the PU bed in the morning and try to put some feed in the creepfeeder - very carefully.

 Ron, glad your VA visit went well.  Good luck with your new PCP tomorrow.

 Yes, I do remember churning butter.  I don't remember a churn, probably was one before I got involved.  We'd put the cream in a gallon jar and rock it back and forth to make the butter.  Sara, the buttermilk was really good.  Mother also made her own cottage cheese.  As I look back on our discussions it seems we were almost totally self sufficient except for condiments, meal, sugar and flour.  We knew where the food came from and what was in it.  I do remember one thing - we raised cabbage and to keep the worms off we'd sprinkle it with Sevin.  I'm sure some of the powder got between the leaves and we most likely ate it with no problems. 

 Sara - I hope you like your new neighbors - you all will probably work out something to exchange fruits and vegetables - that would be good.  Can't understand why raw milk can't be sold in your state.  I was raised on it and so was everyone else around here.  Just the times, I guess.  I think I was around twelve when daddy and one of my uncles installed bathroom in our house.  I surely remember the trips to the outhouse in the wintertime - kind of scary when it was dark.

 What was wrong with your kraut?  Patsy says that's the one food she can eat when she's really sick.  Charles used to cook it with pork chops.  I liked it right out of the jar.

 I had a call from the social worker at OUMC.  I had called her yesterday and she returned the call but I missed it.  She had already talked with Sarah so I gave her information that Sarah couldn't remember.  She's going to set up home health for her along with the PCP.  If we can get someone to check in every day, that would be good.  No discharge date has been discussed, which is good.  She needs to stay until they can figure out how to ease some of her symptoms. 

 Sarah called while I was in town.  She's very hoarse from upchucking last night.  I told her to try to sleep some and call me later. 

 Glad to be home.  Everyone in this part of the country, take care today - it's going to be very hot with high heat indices.

 Shirley, I'm thinking of you and Bill - hope you both are safe and sound.  Please let us know when you can.


Sayra
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 2:53 PM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


My first jar did ok.  It is in refrigerator and I’ve been eating it.  The other just kept getting mold on it.  It didn’t stink but I just didn’t think it smelled like kraut.  I have one other jar still fermenting and so far it seems ok.  May have not had enough brine on top of others.  It’s a learning curve I guess.
ElyVet
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 3:34 PM
Joined: 11/30/2011
Posts: 604


Lorita

We are ok. We left Florida Monday and went to our house in SC.

Left today to go check on the park model in Silver Springs Florida

We will be there Friday. Have to stop several Times for Bill to rest.

Friends at the resort said we had high winds and rain. But for now all looks ok.

Hope Sarah can get home health and then she would have better care.

I was raised in the country and we raised all our meat and vegetables.

WE pick mugusdines, plums, blackberries, peaches and made jelly and jams.

When there is so many kids it sure helps. I was the oldest girl of  8 kids.I

Shirley


ronald71111
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 5:41 PM
Joined: 10/12/2014
Posts: 620


Another walk down memory lane! Who else might have had these delicious treats  growing up? We would take hot buttermilk biscuits and bow a hole in the center, add butter and sugar and have a great snack. Also, take cornbread and crumble it up in a glass, add milk and have another great snack. Been a long time since I've had either, but sure enjoyed them as a child.

Ron


Sayra
Posted: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 8:36 PM
Joined: 8/10/2016
Posts: 1608


Haven’t eaten a biscuit that way.  Do like cornbread and milk.  Have eaten that all my life and still do.