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New here, my 41 year old husband was just diagnosed with Alzheimers
Alynn
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 10:23 AM
Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 7


Hello,

I guess I am looking for other people in my situation. My husband is still active and working. His symptoms now are forgetting little things(short term memory), calling objects the wrong name, not thinking through all solutions to a problem. No one at work or extended family have noticed anything. How fast is this going to happen? What if he loses his job? I am in a constant state of worry about the future.

I will need support during this and most groups in my area are not full of people in there 40's.

Thanks.


4her
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 11:52 AM
Joined: 6/19/2013
Posts: 15


Hi Alynn,

I'm sorry to hear about your husband's diagnosis. It is overwhelming and scary, but you came to the right place.

My mom has Alzheimers and she is in her 60s. I'm not in exactly the same boat, but I am in a sense because it is someone very close to me and I'm young.

Everyone progresses in the disease at different rates. It is hard to tell how fast he will progress. My suggestions right now are:
1. Make sure he is seeing a neurologist who has experience with Alzheimer's.
2. Get him on some Alz meds asap if he isn't already.
3. Get your legal stuff in order.
4. Join an in person support group. Check alz.org for groups in your area.

Keep coming here. You are not alone.

Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 12:38 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17709


Welcome, Alynn. Please invite your husband to join us patients on our board. This is the best place for him to receive support for his new diagnosis. We can give him information that he won't find anywhere else.

If you visit the Spouse/Partner board, you will find others who are going through what you are going through.

Iris L.

Jo C.
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 2:41 PM
Joined: 12/9/2011
Posts: 12279


Hello Alynn, and a very warm welcome to you. I am truly so very sorry for what is happening and can imagine how stunning this news has been for you and your husband; the stress must be off the charts, that is completely understandable when facing such an unknown.

I think that the most effective thing one can do is to gain as much knowledge as possible, and for certain, to gain good legal advice early on and to begin to structure your finances and dynamics for what will be of benefit in the future.

When one is getting legal advice, it is best to see an Elder Law Attorney. This is the specialty that deals with so much within this venue, and they can project into the future for what you will need to do later and how to set everything into place as much as possible now.

One can enter one's zip code into different attorney search engines. One search can be done through the National Elder Law Association at www.naela.org the other can be done through www.cela.com Cela requires a test to become a member, but there are far fewer Cela attorneys and sometimes they charge more.

Also, the Alzheimer's Assn. has a Helpline at (800) 272-3900. If you call, PLEASE ask to speak to a, Care Consultant. Consultants are highly educated Social Workers who work for the Assn. and who specialize in dementia and all that entails. They may also be able to locate an Early Onset Support Group for you and sometimes for your husband too. Some of these groups are sponsored by the Alzheimer's Assn.

If you have a large university medical center near you that has a free-standing dedicated Dementia Clinic, it may also benefit you to obtain an appointment with a Social Worker or other helpful entities there too.

It is good to try and build a good support team with family, friends, church, healthcare providers and helping entities. You will undoubtedly do this over time as you move forward, and it is good to begin now in small ways.

There is a book that, Mimi, one of our Peer Volunteers who actually has dementia recommends as a good starting point, it is, "The Alzheimer's Action Plan," by Doraiswamy and Gwyther of Duke University.

Speaking to the elder law attorney and to the Assn. Consultant and to your husband's dementia specialists will help to guide you and bring knowledge you will need as things move forward. And of course, research and read, read, read. Knowledge is power and grabbing as much power as possible is key to success.

Some of our Loved Ones (LOs) have, MCI = Mild Cognitive Impairment which may or may not grow into a full onset of Alzheimer's Disease. Since your LO has already been diagnosed with AD, this then seems not to be his issue.

I do want to say, that when you do reading on this site, please do not be undone by a lot of what you read. Many persons with AD have a much slower course of disease, and also, many of our persons with AD never, ever develop some of the larger issues you might see being described here on the Board. The nature of a Message Board such as this one is that many of the people who come to communicate are having significant problem issues and come to find assistance and input.

You will find other spouses on the Spousal Forum whose LOs have had Early Onset, and they can speak to the job issues, etc. There is a lot of advice to be had from those who have walked the path earlier on.

Please do know you are no longer alone with no one who understands what you are facing and what your fears are; all of us here have been on similar paths and we certainly do understand.

Please do let us know how you are and how things are going, we truly will be thinking of you and we truly do care.

J.


bseidy
Posted: Friday, April 17, 2015 10:17 PM
Joined: 4/17/2015
Posts: 2


Alynn
I am 40, and my husband and I have a 18 month old daughter. In 2011 my husband starting showing signs that something was "wrong" we thought it was hormonal or depression. He was a RN that did his job well, so when they noticed him missing his charting or making a few poor decisions they fired him. I swore it was depression because he was so young. We worked together on a dementia unit so (I worked on it for 18 yrs) I surely should've seen the signs. It's so different when its your own family. He was finally diagnosed in Jan 2014 with early onset frontal temporal dementia. He has had quite a decline in these past few months. Having worked with dementia for many years I have seen it progress slowly and quickly. Take one day at a time, enjoy every moment with him. Even the not so good days. Since your husband is still working, and can discuss things it seems try to make financial plans for the "what ifs" my husband has disability, and my daughter and I also receive benefits because we are dependents. I also work part time. I am his full time care giver. Please if I can help at all let me know. Even though I have worked with dementia for a long time, and have wonderful coworkers who understand the disease, they still don't understand what it's like to have a spouse or partner with it.

alz+
Posted: Monday, April 20, 2015 7:57 PM
Joined: 9/12/2013
Posts: 3608


Thank you to Jo C and the care givers who responded.

While it is difficult to be the person living with ALZ these responses were really consoling. I don't recall reading messages like this on the YOAD section. Kind of felt like when I am overwhelmed in the world and my husband steps in to cover for me.


It is hard to comprehend people so young having dementia. I send all of us love and courage.


AngelaD
Posted: Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:06 PM
Joined: 4/10/2015
Posts: 25


Alynn, don't you love the wisdom on this website? Here are my thoughts:

I have been diagnosed with younger onset AKA early onset Alzheimer's. Luckily I was diagnosed early and I have been on the Aricept 10 mg. Even though I was diagnosed via PET scan, two people in my family now swear I do not have Alzheimer's. For me, that Aricept has really helped. Also, being social and doing as much as I can.
I wonder if your husband was diagnosed with a PET scan. I believe that I have heard that that is the definitive way to be diagnosed.
Regarding the job issue, as a last resort, a person can get Social Security Disability (SSDI) under the Compassionate Allowances program. However, Social Security has the diagnosis listed as EARLY ONSET ALZHEIMER'S, not the new term of "younger onset Alzheimer's". If a person were going to file, I would recommend using the term early onset Alzheimer's.
You know, Alynn, although you guys are in a new arena in your lives, you will learn a lot. Please share what you learn with everyone you can. Everyone is afraid to talk about this disease but everyone needs to know as much information as they can.
Please keep sharing on the boards and just get as much information as you can. You will find that the world will support you on your journey!

Lakhota
Posted: Monday, April 27, 2015 12:56 AM
Joined: 4/8/2015
Posts: 226


Hello Alynn,

I'm 46 and my wife was diagnose with early onset AD in January of 2012 however, as I look back there were signs before that. As 4her said get the legal stuff in order ie wills, POA and so forth it is much easier to do now than in the future. Aslo find a support group and go you may be the youngest there as am I but they can give you support and ideas on how to handle this. As Besidly said the only people that truly understand this are the care givers and the person with AD. My wife is in late stage 5 to early stage 6 she knows I take care of her and everything else but really doesn't understand the stress I'm under. I do not understand everything that is going on in her mind sometimes I wish I did and other times I can only imagine what is going on with what I see on the out side.

Talk to your husband about this if he wants to and if not let him know you are there if and when he wants to.Just hug him and let him know you are there you love him and is still your husband and hero. You will make it through this and we will help you.


Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, April 27, 2015 3:08 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


So many caregivers for Younger Onset folks.

Please do encourage your partner to join us on this board.

Caregivers, the title of this Board can be a bit confusing. It's designed for folks with the disease who fit the Younger Onset Age.

However, all are free to post here. I post here and I was well past the Younger Onset designation when I was diagnosed.

It seems to several of us on these boards that the folks who are diagnosed at a younger age, can be more proactive in their own treatment.

By that I mean:
1. Those folks can participate in planning for their own treatment and the legal paper work that needs to be done.

2. Those folks are better at following Best Practices and thus most will linger in this Early Stage for much longer than normal.

3. Those folks can become more active at the local and National level. We need to educate the general public about both Younger Onset and the fact that it can be diagnosed early when the patient can still be able to be proactive.


Best Practices:
1. Take meds when and as directed.

2. Strenuous physical exercise. The aim is to get the heart pumping at a faster than normal rate for a time.

3. Strenuous and varied cognitive activities. Try something new. Write your life story and coordinate it with all those photos lying around.Volunteer as appropriate.

4. Mediterranean Diet. I also take Omega 3 and antioxidants. No smoking. Limit alcohol.

5.Maintain or increase socialization.

Mimi S.
Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2015 10:08 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Please, all you folks involved in Younger Onset, do stay together. This place is a good place. All of you have a special path and there is strength in numbers.

Someone who is employed in a dementia setting was surprised they didn't notice the symptoms. This is the same reason so any of our friends and relatives deny we have dementia. We are not in residential settings. We live by ourselves or with our SO. We can carry on a conversation. We have deficits but can still, function. And the better we care for ourselves (Best Practices) the longer we will stay like we are. All sorts of research backs us up.

Do, please stay together.

Amy R
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015 8:55 PM
Joined: 12/11/2014
Posts: 34


Hi, I am 42 and my husband is 51, we have an 8 yr old. He's had EOAD for about 4-5 years. I work full time and we also get disability benefits for him and our son which helps greatly. He takes Namenda, Aricept and just started taking Depakote. My husbands symptoms were just like your husbands in the beginning. With the help of the medication he has progressed somewhat slowly but does get a little worse each year. I don't have time to go to support groups and I would suspect they consist mostly of older patients/ caregivers. I do like to view this message board, that is my support group. The caregivers typically use the forum for spouses/ caregivers. You will need to get power of attorney for your husband and guardianship for your child. All the documents you get fir your husband, you need to get for yourself, remember, if you die your child will go to your husband and your husband will not be able to properly care for him/her. You need wills, guardianship for your child and a guardianship form for your husband so someone can take care if him as well. A lawyer can explain it all to you. It's a little pricey but very necessary.
TayB4
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2015 7:42 AM
Joined: 8/8/2014
Posts: 886


Hi Alynn,

I am glad they you have found these boards, as they are a great source of information, friendship, and comfort. My husband is 48 and was diagnosed 6 months ago with Mild Cognitive Inpairment, but his symptoms are consistent with EOAD. He has been unable to sustain employment for 2 years. He was approved for SSDI two monthsago after first being denied. We appealed and he was approved. I often post on the spouses/caregiver board and find. Lot of valuable information, but I must caution you that many caregivers in that board are dealing with very extreme behaviors from their spouse and it can be scary to think that is our future. My understanding is that these behaviors are in the minority and not all people with Alz/dementia exhibit all of these symptoms.

Mimi S.
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2015 8:36 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi TayB4,
What was the process of your husband's diagnosis. some experts in the diagnostic field claim that the differentiation between MCI and Early Stage Ad is a very precise line. I, with no medical background, beg to differ. to me the lie is a big wavy line. It can vary depending upon how the test felt during the time of examination and also upon how the tester interprets the score. Some have a fixed line on the cognitive test score that says AD. In other words if for example one scored at the 25th percentile on 4 tests, then you ave AD. Others consider where the person began at. Suppose the person's pre cognition was in the 98th percentile ad the person scored at the 45th percentile on several tests. This is only five points below normal However, in essence the person has lost half of their cognition in those areas. Is that Mild? The guy who tested me says no.

You say he is acting more like early stage and is unable to hold a job.

Have you and your husband discussed adapting Best Practices? Several of us on these Boards swear by them. If you don't know what they are, do ask.

TayB4
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2015 8:52 AM
Joined: 8/8/2014
Posts: 886


Mimi,
My husband had blood work, EEG (seizures as a child), MRI (no significant changes from the one two years before), and the neuropsychology exam. He was impaired in a number of areas. I can't remember now how many or which ones. He has almost no short term memory and has difficulty making/executing plans. He is able to do all adl's and do tasks such as yard work, household chores, etc. I do see his ability to think logically slipping. His personality began to change about 5 years ago. His moods can switch very quickly.

TayB4
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2015 8:54 AM
Joined: 8/8/2014
Posts: 886


He is following Best Practices. He started taking Aricept 5 months ago. He has tried Namenda and couldn't tolerate it.
Mimi S.
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2015 12:59 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


I'm glad he's on Aricept. Was there a discussion with his neuro about a possible alternate for the Namenda?

So glad he's doing Best Practices.

kwc
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2015 2:18 PM
Joined: 5/22/2014
Posts: 37


I am glad to hear how he is doing after 5 yrs as I am into my 2nd yr of this mess I was told in 2013 I have ALZ I am I am 54 almost 55 All I can say is laughter is good medicine I do take aricept an a clinical trial drug LMTM lots of vitamins my wife gives them to me I worked as a chemical operator for 27 yrs that is what my wife figures what added to me (all the poisons) as no ALZ in my family tree
catia712
Posted: Friday, September 8, 2017 3:59 AM
Joined: 8/20/2017
Posts: 9


Hi All, I'm 53 on my own, and this is far the hardest thing in my life so far....I'm scared to tell my boss out of fear of being a liability to this young startup company..I've read some of your post and prayers go out to you all; I have a very similar case as far as EOAD; I'm the caregiver for my wife of 53 all starting at age 49-1/2; we had no diagnosis as her Doctor did not do the right tests to rule out EOAD 4 years ago even after second opinion at Stanford. We moved to LA feeling hopeful after my cousin knew of a great Doctor whom we now seen once. We are convinced she is the one who genuinely cares to get to the bottom of this.My wife warmed up to her immediately and so did I" she took all all the necessary personal time & to make us feel truly cared for" So very impressed" My wife is far too young for this and for us our only true coping strength is our believing in God giving us some peace & strength through this absolute trying time.

We are told only Medicare pays for a PET Scan; and we may have to go to the Spinal-Tap anyway, though her doc says she qualifies for early Medicare just with her condition.

Next appointment Oct. 6th we'll see how goes, this is far the most challenging thing ever in our 25 years of marriage.
I believe my wife is between stage 6 & 7, not sure exactly; Can you advise me from your experience?

God Bless & Take Care All,
Mimi S.
Posted: Friday, September 8, 2017 8:04 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Catia,

Welcome to our world. We're so glad yu found us.

You have responded to a very old post. If you don't get responses, copy what you wrote and begin a new post.

Some of the confirmation tests you are looking for, the spinal tap and the glucose PET scan are usually not available as part of insurance plans. If you can find a clinical trial, it might be provided as part of the trial.

The book by Doraiswamy and Gwyther, The Alzheimer's Action Plan outlines what a good test consists of.  Ask for it at your library.

Do contact your local Alzheimer's Association and see what support is available for both of you.

Good luck.


eaglemom
Posted: Friday, September 8, 2017 8:15 AM
Joined: 3/7/2012
Posts: 2718


For some reason this thread was bumped forward. The initial posting was in 2015.

eagle

 


BlueSkies
Posted: Friday, September 8, 2017 11:33 AM
Joined: 2/24/2016
Posts: 1096


Eaglemom, it's because catia712 posted today and Mimi has already responded. 

I would also suggest as Mimi suggested that not only copy and paste and repost, but you might want to repost on the spousal and or caregiver board as well.  I am sure many will be able to help you on there also.

Catia712 I am so glad you found a doc that you both like.  That is so important.  I would have your wife do what tests your doc thinks you need as long as they are covered by insurance or you can reasonably afford.  There is no 100% for sure tests for this diagnosis.  That is only available at autopsy unfortunately.  They can be more accurate though at diagnosing the problem, the more tests they can do.

Please do repost on a caregiver board.  There are so many on there in your same situation who will be able to relate to you even better.

Wishing you and your wife the best as you go forward...


catia712
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 2:20 AM
Joined: 8/20/2017
Posts: 9


Hi All, Just received word today that our BS Of Cal insurance will cover the PET scan;

Is there anyway to make the PET scan more conclusive? my wife is very skidish on any procedures...and hope we don't have to schedule a spinal-tap we heard for sure to request the tap to be a guided one..for best outcome.
Looks like since we are now getting SS Disability my DW will get Medicare but I don't understand why she has to wait 2 years, I think I read on SS website something too that says it's automatic enrollment after getting SSD.

Thank You, for the good advise and warm words" 
Kind Regards, (Day By Day is all we can do...  )

 

 


BillBRNC
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 7:18 AM
Joined: 12/2/2015
Posts: 1018


catia712 wrote:

Hi All, Just received word today that our BS Of Cal insurance will cover the PET scan;

Is there anyway to make the PET scan more conclusive? my wife is very skidish on any procedures...and hope we don't have to schedule a spinal-tap we heard for sure to request the tap to be a guided one..for best outcome.
Looks like since we are now getting SS Disability my DW will get Medicare but I don't understand why she has to wait 2 years, I think I read on SS website something too that says it's automatic enrollment after getting SSD.

Thank You, for the good advise and warm words" 
Kind Regards, (Day By Day is all we can do...  )

 

Catia, did I read this right that both you and your wife have early onset? That is a real bummer for sure. I have Dementia with Lewy Bodies, also confirmed by Pet Scan. If you can, I think the best Pet Scan that gives the best read for all forms of dementia is the Glucose Pet Scan. It is what I had, and it showed I had DLB with some other forms of dementia possibly mixed in. As for Medicare, I don't recall waiting two years to get Medicare, don't think I had to wait more than a few months after getting SSD, but my memory of those things is bad now. You might have to wait if you are less than the early retirement age (for me that was 63), but then I just don't recall. But if you are say 1 or less, you might have to wait. I'm sure someone at the hospital can answer this for you. If not, call one of the SSD help numbers, assuming there are any. If the Pet Scan shows you have it, then I personally would forgo the spinal tap as unnecessary. Just my two cents. But good luck to you and wife. Bill.



hiscaregiver
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 5:01 PM
Joined: 9/20/2017
Posts: 3


Wow! I really feel for you. My husband was 59 and I thought he was young. The one thing I wish I had done differently, is I wish I had gotten a job right away to help with bills, especially medical insurance. Now, I don't feel like I can leave him. He needs me too much and we aren't ready for a care home yet. Needless to say, the finances are a stressor.

 


hiscaregiver
Posted: Wednesday, September 20, 2017 5:03 PM
Joined: 9/20/2017
Posts: 3


I like your photo.
TheSteven
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 11:28 AM
Joined: 10/11/2014
Posts: 167


Welcome Alynn,

You've gotten some great advice. Have you checked the inside of your husband's mouth for any dark dental fillings? If he has them it may be the root of his problems since they contain 50 percent mercury and constantly releases into the body. After losing my job I was diagnosed with Younger Onset Alzheimer's. About a year after that, after much research, I had my mercury dental fillings removed. My conditions improved and now my DX is mild cognitive impairment.

If your husband does have these fillings, see http://amalgam.org/education/scientific-evidenceresearch/results-removal-amalgam-fillings/ or

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/02/Sep02/091602/80027dde.pdf

I have more links to this type of information and videos about this in my July 4, 2015 blog entry at http://thestevenalztreatment.blogspot.com

There are lots of supplements he can take as well even if he doesn't have any amalgam fillings. I started a new topic on the board “Awakening from Alzheimer's” with some links from Peggy Sarlin's videos available today. Watch these today and then look at the list of books and links on my blog.


Jen77
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 4:50 PM
Joined: 9/23/2017
Posts: 69


MMy husband is 53 and was just diagnosed in July. We have 3 boys ages 9 to 15.  HHe was a licensed marriage and family therapist until 2 yrs ago we noticed he couldn't keep up w his billing deadlines and lost his job. He started teaching at a loc as long private school where went continued to see his memory loss progress but were still in denial. Then in January he was fired from that job. It was during that time I saw how bad things had gotten when he couldn't fill out an application using his resume for reference.  After much discussion I finally talked him into going to the dr. It took 3 months of tests before he was diagnosed.
Jen77
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 4:55 PM
Joined: 9/23/2017
Posts: 69


New here. Husband 53 was diagnosed in July. He's progressed very quickly from January when he was fired from his job. Can anyone give me insight as to why he would stop showering and shaving. And what I can do to get him to shower and sh a very regularly.
Jen77
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 4:56 PM
Joined: 9/23/2017
Posts: 69


New here. Husband 53 was diagnosed in July. He's progressed very quickly from January when he was fired from his job. Can anyone give me insight as to why he would stop showering and shaving. And what I can do to get him to shower and sh a very regularly.
BillBRNC
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 5:56 PM
Joined: 12/2/2015
Posts: 1018


Jen, sorry to hear about your situation. It is no fun for sure, and it will become less so in the months and possibly years to come. I have Dementia with Lewy Bodies. You don't say what you DW was diagnosed with, but I assume it was Alz. But all dementias are bad and basically hopeless. Folks around this board will be very helpful. I'm just not feeling like I can be much right now, so I leave it to others. As for shower and shave, this is somewhat common with Alz and other dementias. I still shower and shave, but I can't remember to do it or remember where I'm at in the process when doing it. I don't think your DW is unusual in this way. Others will suggest some books you might want to read, and I recommend that very much. If you go to the Spouse Caregiver Board you will find many, many spouses in the same situation you are in right now, and they are a terrific resource for information and support, and you will need much of both. Good luck. Bill.
Mimi S.
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 9:13 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Jen,

Welcome to our world. We're so glad you found us.

You have latched on to posts from  a few years ago, but as you can read, diagnosis happens too young.

Showering and shaving may no longer be an everyday thing. Have you read: Understanding the Dementia Experience. It's on line. Also browse : alz.org.  Do put those term and alzheimer's  into your browser.

Showering: Best time of day? Hand held head.  Sometimes covering mirrors helps. Try bribery: candy, car ride, whatever.


catia712
Posted: Saturday, October 28, 2017 4:02 AM
Joined: 8/20/2017
Posts: 9


Hi, and yes we are the younger ones;  this is the hardest thing I've ever had to do in my life but these kind of things we cannot choose.  Recently been looking at

some new potential hope on the natural healing side of things: Dawn of the Era of Treatable Alzheimer's   MPI Cognition
Dr.Dale E. Bredesen of Neurology 1-800-450-0805  info@drbredesen.com
They call it RE-CODE; there are many videos to back this, I'm requesting more info as it's surely less expensive than doing nothing.

File Attachment(s):
Hi.docx (11777 bytes)

catia712
Posted: Saturday, October 28, 2017 4:06 AM
Joined: 8/20/2017
Posts: 9


Hi Mimi S,Do you know of this Doctor?  Dawn of the Era of Treatable Alzheimer's   MPI Cognition

Dr.Dale E. Bredesen of Neurology 1-800-450-0805  info@drbredesen.com

RE-CODE
Mimi S.
Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 4:18 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Catia,

Sorry, I just found this.

Yes, I have heard of him. I'm sure you will  find a liot about him and his practice o line.
I'm only going by my recall, so you know how detiled thqt is.

What I like about his program is that he incorporates a lot of what we call Best Practices: Mediterranean Diet, sustained physical activity, varied cognitive activities, social activity and take appropriate meds.

I don't believe in going as detailed as he gets.


Mimi S.
Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 4:21 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Catia,

Sorry, I just found this.

Yes, I have heard of him. I'm sure you will  find a liot about him and his practice o line.
I'm only going by my recall, so you know how detiled thqt is.

What I like about his program is that he incorporates a lot of what we call Best Practices: Mediterranean Diet, sustained physical activity, varied cognitive activities, social activity and take appropriate meds.

I don't believe in going as detailed as he gets.