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Scent museum's Carbolic soap (WWII) helps one man to bathe again
HowDoYouDeal
Posted: Friday, August 23, 2019 11:31 AM
Joined: 2/17/2019
Posts: 189


WWII Carbolic soap apparently helped a man who was socially outcast because he just would not bathe, had developed a fear of water. So a scent museum in England helped get the soap to him, and apparently it helped him recall pleasant memories of bathing in front of the fire.

One institution has (had?) scent memorabilia  available in candy-machine type dispensers. A leather ball glove for memories of going to baseball games etc

 

This article has such a great title, I had to include it.

Why I smell like it's 1903


Lane Simonian
Posted: Sunday, August 25, 2019 9:32 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4565


This is fascinating.  Scents are indeed tied to memory, in most cases good memories.

There are two parts of the brain--the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus--where neurons can be regenerated.  Both are damaged in Alzheimer's disease.  Interesting essential oils via aromatherapy can be used to treat both the loss of smell and Alzheimer's disease.

https://www.the-scientist.com/notebook/regularly-whiffing-essential-oils-can-retrain-lost-sense-of-smell-32599

https://www.ecu.edu/news/newsstory.cfm?id=947


HowDoYouDeal
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 7:13 PM
Joined: 2/17/2019
Posts: 189


I found carbolic soap for sale in the UK. Okay not so helpful, I will keep lookingThe clean and mildly disinfectant scent of a traditional bar of soap. An aroma full of nostalgia for earlier days. Island Pride Carbolic Germicidal Soap - 4.41oz - 12 Pack


HowDoYouDeal
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 7:39 PM
Joined: 2/17/2019
Posts: 189


For Christine Kelly, an American expat living in England, smell training restored a perceptual experience she had lost completely after a viral infection four years ear­lier. Her anosmia led to depression, and during this low point Kelly met a clinician who introduced her to smell training with essential oils. On her train ride home from that initial visit, Kelly decided that if she were to do this, she would observe herself along the way. “In that respect I became a student of anosmia, rather than a victim,” she says.

She kept careful track of her training—noting how well she could pick up a scent, distinguish it from others, and smell it the same way she had before the infection (a common problem among those who suffer from a loss of the sense of smell is parosmia—scent distortion).

After a few months of training, odors began to come into focus for Kelly. At first, they were terrible. “Everything had an unearthly, disgusting smell that would vacillate between burning Teflon frying pans [and] spoiling ham sandwiches that had been left inside a camper van in the rain for three months,” she recalls. Then, with continued training, Kelly was able to get a fix on lemon. More and more smells followed.


HowDoYouDeal
Posted: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 7:44 PM
Joined: 2/17/2019
Posts: 189


Since its likely that other people are just as link wary as I am, I am pasting some of the contents from Lane's links below for convenience.  Here are the scents used and their effect.

To stimulate appetite, a scent mixture of grapefruit and clove is sprayed on patients’ bibs before mealtime.

A scent mixture of grapefruit and frankincense is used to help curb the so-called Sundown symptoms, such as anger and sadness, that often occur during the early evenings.

A third scent, a mix of rosemary and orange, is offered to caregivers and staff to help ease stress and stimulate creativity.

 “These scents release seratonin and endorphins and can decrease depression and pain in the brain,” she said. “If people are more alert, it decreases falls. And because people are feeling better, they sleep better, which makes them sturdier on their feet during the day.”

 

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“When people smell things, they are linked immediately and unconsciously to the past,” she said. “When you take a vitamin or an essential oil, it is made up of the same molecules as the body. It uses what it needs and the rest is eliminated.”

The study enables Loy to look at how appetite and moods are affected by the scents. To stimulate appetite, a scent mixture of grapefruit and clove is sprayed on patients’ bibs before mealtime. A scent mixture of grapefruit and frankincense is used to help curb the so-called Sundown symptoms, such as anger and sadness, that often occur during the early evenings.

Participants who receive one scent do not receive the other scent. A third scent, a mix of rosemary and orange, is offered to caregivers and staff to help ease stress and stimulate creativity. In the past, Farnell said she has seen dozens of people helped by the aromas and hopes even more will be helped through this study.

“These scents release seratonin and endorphins and can decrease depression and pain in the brain,” she said. “If people are more alert, it decreases falls. And because people are feeling better, they sleep better, which makes them sturdier on their feet during the day.”

Mary Knapp, 90, a resident at Beverly Health Care, is one of the dozens of participants in Loy’s study. Each day she wears on her sweater a heart-shaped patch scented with frankincense and grapefruit. Knapp described the scent as “mellow.”

Knapp’s daughter, Mary Langston, of Greenville, said she has noticed a marked change in the past few weeks in her mother’s attention span and ability to better remember relatives in photographs and scrapbooks.

“It’s been nice. It makes it so much easier to sit down and talk to her. As a child, you can’t imagine your parent’s not being able to remember things. But lately, it’s like she has been reborn,” Langston said. “She doesn’t get upset that she can’t remember things. Her attention span certainly has improved and she enjoys being around people more. Noises aren’t as disturbing for her.”

Beverly Health Care recreational therapist Amy Smith, who directs the study with nine patients at the care facility, said that keeping residents off medications helps them to be more alert and aware of their surroundings, and more willing to engage with others.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Saturday, September 21, 2019 10:48 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4565


I keep thinking that I am following all these posts and then I keep missing some.  Thank you for these posts and all your posts HowDoYouDeal.  

There are two parts of the brain in which neurons can be regenerated: the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus.  These parts of the brain are also damaged in Alzheimer's disease.  Both sense of smell and certain memories can likely be at least partially restored via aromatherapy.  

Years ago, the mother of a nurse involved in the above study was on these boards.  She told me that once the study stopped the residents lost access to aromatherapy and they lost the improvements that they had made.  It made me sad to hear that.

For my mother we used a variety of essential oils via aromatherapy including rosemary, clove, oregano, thyme, bay laurel, and orange.  All except the last are stimulating essential oils (my mother used to say they almost knocked her out).  A few people have told me that the more stimulating essential oils increased agitation in their loved ones.  It is not clear whether the use of more relaxing essential oils such as lavender, orange, lemon balm, and rose would counteract this potentially negative side effect.

The most direct route to the brain is through the nose.  Several of the chemicals in several essential oils act as antioxidants which leads to some growth of neurons in the hippocampus and improvements in certain forms of memory (facial recognition, object recognition, sense of time and place, and overall alertness).