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What to Keep Dad Busy? Can't run w/scissors...
Internal Administrator
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: Van

My dad was a barber for most of his life. If he were a carpenter, I would have my son make him a carpenter-type busy box to mess with. If he were a mechanic, I'd figure something out too. He was a barber, for Pete's sake, and I can't give him scissors or clippers!

Any ideas of what might translate to "fun" or enjoyment for keeping him busy? He does puzzles, looks at the newspaper, and watches TV and that's about it.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: flowergirl951

Hello all. This is my first post here. My mom lives with me and she is the Energizer Bunny! She loves to be busy. I let her sweep the house and outside sidewalk, if the weather permits. I have to watch that she doesn't get too hot, as she won't quit.

She really loves to trace patterns on paper, using cookie cutters, and cut them out. She also loves to cut out coupons. She can no longer do puzzles but she can string large beads on pipe cleaners (bracelets). She also can separate a container of buttons according to color into a muffin tin.

I'm looking for other activities too, as sitting for too long at the table makes her neck hurt. It has to be simple enough that I don't have to give her the directions over and over again.

Barbara, So. Calif.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: Becky W.

I give my Dad those fuzzy black pictures to color with markers. Also found some wooden Christmas ornaments and some paints tht look like pens but actually have a brush on the end. Elmer's glue makes them. He likes to color and it keeps him busy.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: slaflesh

I have the same concern about my dad who is 94. he just wants to sit in his rocking chair and watch tv. I get so upset seeing this. I went to Toys r Us and bought a bingo game. My Mom who has AD loves playing it for hours with the aide. My Dad has joined along with them. I also went out today to a craft store and bought a birdhouse kit to put together and paint. Tomorrow we will try and tackle this project. Might help you!
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: SnowyLynne

Can he help you with prepping food for meals?Setting the table?
Fold clothes?If he can't I'm so sorry.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: Van

quote:
Originally posted by SnowyLynne:
Can he help you with prepping food for meals?Setting the table?
Fold clothes?If he can't I'm so sorry.


He's in a care center and I'm not sure what they would allow him to do. I know he helps push wheelchairs down some days.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: New Realm

New Realm4 Me Posted April 08, 2007 10:46 PM

Van,

Ask Dad to help you with one of your dvd projects. I bet he'd get a great big kick out of telling barbershop stories on tape, looking through old time barbershop memorabilia, and setting it to barbershop quartet music. An old boyfriend of mine was a member of a barbershop quartet, and even though I was into the 70's music at the time I adored the barbershop quartets. In the 90's a fellow nurses husband was in a barbershop quartet and I was happy to see, even in younger generations how popular it still was.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: Bettyhere

My husband was an engineer, always with machines--and no, I could not let him continue with that. There are any number of books about things to do for people with AD. I have a guide about them on Amazon. Go to Alzheimer's there and look at the left-hand column, I never know when it's going to be there. For a while I hired a man who took him out a few afternoons a week, to the park, the beach, doing guy-stuff, and that worked pretty well. I also taped his favorite programs and played them over and over, and he seemed to like it all.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: JTP202

The previous poster makes a good point. While my father was able, we asked him to write down as many of his good stories as he could remember, so we could have it bound in a book fore the coming generations.

He was never able to finish what he was working on, but it gave him something pleasant to do that let him reflect on fond memories and made him feel important.

The only consideration is that trying to rememeber details could be frustrating and some memories are not as pleasant, particularly through the prism of Alzheimer's. We would generally pick a happy story he told us in the past and ask him to write it down.

I hope that helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: Vicki B

My parents always had a jigsaw puzzle up on a cardtable but as Dad progressed he found the 1000 piece puzzles too hard to do. I have found several 300 piece LARGE FORMAT puzzles and he now spends hours working his puzzles. The pieces are larger and much easier for him to handle.
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: scubadiva

My father is gone now...but we gave him Legos and blocks, or crayons and paper.
But supervise...he would put things in his mouth.
Maybe larger blocks made of foam? Things he can stack and move around?
Anonymous
Posted: Friday, January 6, 2012 2:41 PM
Originally posted by: Van

Vicki,
We think alike! That was what happened with Dad. His puzzle numbers had to keep going down and down. I have a daycare business out of my home, so I was able to offer him several options. He got to the point, at times, of just holding a piece and turning it around and around, not sure what to do with it. Very sad to see for sure.

Thanks for the input!!!
 
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