Donate

Standard Monthly Site Maintenance Scheduled for Wednesday, September 23rd from 8:30 p.m. CT to 2 a.m. CT.  Click here for more information.

RSS Feed Print
New Therapies for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease
Internal Administrator
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: hoopdydoo

The Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute Identifies Groundbreaking New Therapies for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease
http://www.prnewswire.com/news...sease-113303809.html
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

quote:
That would make it a "natural supplement" wouldn't it?

No.

One does not attempt to patent the compound, one patents the application and/or methods for its isolation/preparation. If the compound is not already widely sold as a generally beneficial "natural supplement" or "natural remedy" at the time its health benefits are discovered, then one can patent its application for specific health purposes.

The vast majority of patented drugs have been "natural" substances, isolated from living organisms.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: hoopdydoo

http://www.brni.org/news/artic...dentifies_Gr,46.aspx
Published: January 12, 2011 9:00 AM
Morgantown, WV, January 12, 2011 – A Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute (BRNI) study published today in the Journal of Neuroscience reveals underlying causes for the degeneration of synapses in Alzheimer’s Disease and identifies promising pharmaceutical solutions for the devastating condition that affects more than 5 million people in the United States. The BRNI study is the first to achieve fundamental molecular understanding of how synapses are lost in Alzheimer’s Disease before the plaques and tangles develop. At the same time, it is the first study to demonstrate the comprehensive benefits of synaptogenic compounds in treating Alzheimer’s Disease.

The links that don't work were reporting the same news that this "new study" reported?
Is it the concern for safety that causes the delay between the same discovery ?
So this "New Therapies for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease" is actually years old.

No wonder there is no cure!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

I wouldn't say they've been jumping into this, John. I've been tracking BRNI's news releases about Phase II clinical trials for more than three years.

http://clinicaltrial.gov/ct2/show/NCT00606164 (Note the date it was last updated)

http://backup.wvpubcast.org/newsarticle.aspx?id=10302

http://www.brni.org/news/PressRelease42209.htm (no longer on their website):

FDA Gives Clinical Trial Green Light On Drug To Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Previous Studies Show Bryostatin Protects Against Alzheimer’s Protein, Rewires and Repairs Brain Damage

Morgantown, WV (April 22, 2009) - The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute (BRNI) the go-ahead to conduct Phase II clinical trials of Bryostatin for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease patients. The drug showed pre-clinical efficacy to not only treat Alzheimer’s disease symptoms, but also its underlying causes.

“We are very excited about the FDA’s agreement for BRNI to move forward with clinical trials,” said Dr. Daniel Alkon, Scientific Director of BRNI. “Bryostatin shows the promise to repair and protect against neurodegeneration caused by Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and other brain trauma, as well as enhance the brain’s normal memory functions.”

Bryostatin was originally created as an anti-cancer chemotherapy. When BRNI scientists extensively tested PKC activators against Alzheimer’s disease models, they discovered the drug’s hidden potential to stop Alzheimer’s disease.Over the past six years, the drug has shown remarkable possibilities. In preclinical testing, BRNI scientists experimented with Bryostatin on three species of Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mice, each species based on different human Alzheimer’s disease genes. The test results revealed that Bryostatin, and a related class of drugs discovered at BRNI, can reduce the toxic Alzheimer’s disease protein A Beta, restore lost synapses, and protect against the loss of memory functions. Bryostatin has been shown to enhance and restore memory by rewiring connections in the brain previously destroyed by stroke, head trauma, or aging itself.

The Phase II trials, slated to begin in approximately two to four months, will test these preclinical findings on human Alzheimer’s disease patients as well as controls, along with Bryostation’s effects on molecular targets in the human body, such as the signaling enzyme PKC. The drug’s side effects will also be carefully monitored using low doses that were previously found to be generally benign in human cancer patients.



And they will need to take a very close look at safety. The clinical trials on cancer treatment were underwhelming, in terms of confirming the extremely promising pre-clinical efficacy data, and showed severe side-effects as well. They're hoping that the lower doses they plan to use for AD won't produce the same problems.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: swarfmaker

From what I read on Wikipedia about Bryostatin, was isolated from a sea creature. That would make it a "natural supplement" wouldn't it? It appears to be quite difficult to synthesize, so the process to make it would be patentable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryostatin
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: john1943

It's great that they can jump into a Phase 2 trial because the drug is already approved for cancer treatment. Fingers crossed!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

If you want great news, hoopdydoo, look at the "Invitation to Share Thoughts" thread. G Goose is in a bapineuzumab trial, and has had a spectacular response to the drug.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: DebZ

Oh boy, this could really be something. My only hesitation in total elation is the fact that they've only tested on mice so far. As we all know, very often drug/theories tested on mice don't work out for humans. We all should follow this closely tho, as it might well be the silver bullet. Drugs that have targeted the plaques and tangles have not panned out; this direction might be the right one.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: hoopdydoo

The BRNI study marks an important shift in our understanding of how Alzheimer's Disease is caused and should be treated.
Previous autopsy-based studies have shown the critical role of synaptic loss in producing dementia (though, not the reason behind the degeneration), yet for decades scientists and pharmaceutical companies have focused on ways to target the amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles thought to play a role in causing Alzheimer's Disease.
By preventing the loss of synapses, BRNI's new therapeutics prevent the progressive symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: john1943

OK, JAB, spoil my day!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: hoopdydoo

Jab, thanks for clearing that up for me.

LOL...John...hopfully she will make our day with some good news one day soon.Keep watching.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

Sorry, John...

Hoopydoo, I don't think it's the safety issue slowing things down -- they're a nonprofit institute that apparently operates off donations (and they're trying to license some of their intellectual property), so I suspect they're having trouble pulling together enough funding.

The publication is new -- they have some new "pre-clinical" data. It looks like each time they publish some promising data, they announce plans for the Phase II, probably trying to stir up interest among possible contributors and investors.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 10:09 AM
Originally posted by: Deirdre44

Wait - this ''sea creature,'' it's not a jellyfish is it, or related to one?
 
× Close Menu