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Mother having dazed episodes
Internal Administrator
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: CindyL

Wondering if any other AD patients are experiencing this: My mother has had many episodes where she becomes glassy-eyed, almost completely non-responsive and will eventually colapse if standing up. She goes from barely responsive to totally not responsive in a matter of a minute or so unless I take immediate action to get her cooled down by blowing under her blouse, fanning her, etc. She drools, sweats a little and while she is still somewhat responsive, can squeeze my fingers equally on both sides, etc. I rushed her to the emergency room the 1st time this happened where she was admitted to the hospital for several days with a gammit of tests to find nothing. Since then, she has had multiple incidences of this only to come back with no side effects and absolutely no recollection of what just happened. It definitely seems to have something to do with her being overheated. I'll ask her if she's hot or ask her if she feels okay right before an attack and she will say she's perfectly fine. Its like I have to be thinking constantly if she might be hot (when the majority of the time she is cold (cold fingers, etc.) Has anyone else experienced any of this?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Mini V

Dear CindyL

The Alzheimer's Association does not provide medical advice. The description you provided is not part of alzheimer's disease. However, it does sound similar to symptoms of a seizure. You might want to have the doctor evaluate her again for seizures or other medical problems. Seizures occur in about 10 to 15 percent of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease who never had seizures before they developed Alzheimer’s. They usually tend to occur in the later stages of the disease.

I'm sorry to hear that the hospital send your mom away the first time you took her. It must definitely be frustrating for you to see your mom go through the symptoms over and over again without knowing what it is or how to respond to her. I encourage you keep calling the emergency each time this incident occurs with your mom. Eventually, the doctor may be able to provide a diagnosis.

Thank you for using the Alzheimer's Association Online Community. I encourage you to continue using the Message Boards to provide updates and to connect with other caregivers. Feel free to use our 24-hour helpline to speak with a Care Consultant about this or other care-related issues.

Sincerely,

Mini V.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Johanna C.

Hello babym: I am not a Consulatant, the Care Consultant will be here soon. In the meantime, I would like to invite you to join the Caregiver's Forum where the majority of caregivers communicate.

You will get much more feedback that way and that is always a very good thing.

When there is a change in condition, and especially "spells" such as you describe, it is time to get an urgent appointment with the doctor.

These spells could be seondary to mini-strokes, to cardiac arrhythmias, to seizure activity, to low level Vitamin D or B12, to electrolyte imbalance, to an undiagnosed "silent" UTI, to medication effect, and to many other things. It will take a good exam and diagnostics to find the reason.

In the meantime, do join us on the Caregiver Forum, it is the "happening" place.

Best wishes,

Johanna C.
Peer Volunteer
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Kathleen H

Dear babyrn,

Welcome to the online community. I’m glad that you found us, and I hope we will be a continuing source of information and support for you. I’m very sorry that I can’t offer you help directly with this particular question. Care Consultants are not medically trained, and I wouldn’t want to speculate about something so important. I urge you to contact her physician immediately. Describe the symptoms you have observed, as well as any information regarding when this first happened, as well as how often it happens. Provide any other information that can help the doctor determine the cause. Have a list of all medications your mother is taking, both prescription and over-the-counter.

Please don’t delay contacting the doctor, it could be very important. Remember that you may call us for emotional support or for reliable information through our 24-hour helpline @ 1-800-272-3900.

Kind regards,
Kathleen
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Hi Babym,
Welcome to our site. I'm sorry for what brings you here. I won't attempt to answer your question. The Care Consultant will reply shortly.

You have reached a group of experienced Care Givers and some like myself, who have the disease. Please come back and tell us more about yourself.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: babyrn

My 77 yr old mother per my father's account gets limp like she's going to faint then, as he catches her, she becomes rigid and then becomes "normal". Blood sugar is fine, temp is fine.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: jeanc

I know exactly what you mean. My Mom 92 this month has done the same thing. We also took her to the ER and they did several test and could find nothing. They just said it was seizures. She has never had them before. Makes you wonder though doesn't it.....
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Hi Josephine's daughter,
Welcome to our site. I, too, am not a doctor, so can only suggest you ask there.
Sometimes, however, the worsening of the dementia may be only temporary. let's hope so.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Josephine's Daughter

My 84 year-old mother who has been diagnosed with frontal lobe dementia had what her neurologist believes was a seizure. While seating, her head tilted back and she began gurgling loudly and was unreponsive. This lasted about a min. Her dementia now seems worse. Can these seizures cause greater mental impairment? Her neurologist has put her on antiseizure medicine at a very low dose that we are to slowly increase. Any advice would be appreciated.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 11:23 AM
Originally posted by: Norbert

This may be an "Absence Seizure"
 
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