Home Safety Checklist
RSS Feed Print
Driving
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: arm

I have posted before about my husbands driving. The other day he was lost for 6 1/2 hours. He has a GPS, but because of road closures it took him in circles. Before the EOAD he would have figured out which way to go on his own. I stayed on the phone with him and mapquest getting him home. This was a WARNING SIGN. Then yesterday, I left the house, he said he would stay home, he did not. Next thing I know he had an accident. No one was hurt, I think. He does not remember much of it. He did not get a ticket and said the other person did not either. That is hard for me to believe that no one did. Pleas pray for us today, My step-son is coming and is going to talk to him about driving. We are going to call the doctor tomorrow and get an evaluation and let them determine if he should still drive. He is 57. He wants to stay independant. This is going to be so hard. It has to be done. I cannot take a chance on him getting hurt or him hurting someone else. Why doesn't all the states take the initiative to take their driving priveledges when they are diagnosed? Maybe they shouldn't I don't know. Everyone keeps asking me what I will do when he can't drive. I guess I will take him everywhere. It will be our time before the EOAD takes him totally away. I can't help but cry. This is so hard.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: rholl1948

Hello JM29. I believe that losing their driving privelages is one of the hardest losses our LO has to go through. Being able to come and go as you please and then having that taken away and rely on someone else to get you where you need/want to go is so hard for them. However there comes a time that they are a danger to themselves and to others and it has to be done. I am thankful that no one was hurt in the accident. My thoughts and prayers are with you as you deal with this very difficult decision. At 57 he is young to have to give this part of his life up but you are doing what is best for him and others.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: arm

Thank you, I will see what the doctor says and the maybe get him to the driver assesment. He is afraid to drive right now and his truck is out until fixed. Thank you all for your comments and prayers
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: KA

You and your LO must have been very frustrated and scared.

My LO (59 and still highly functioning) is still driving. I asked her to call the local rehab hospital to arrange for her own driving evaluation. I want it in her medical records that she initiated the process to get a baseline performance level, and I want the professional opinion of someone qualified to make that assessment.

I do ride with her more regularly now than I used too. I'm typically the driver when we go someplace together, but now I ask her to drive so I can see if there are things I should be concerned about.

We will have to pay out of pocket for the driving evaluation. We'll pay for another one in the future too just to continue to have it documented officially.

The neuropsychiatrist and the neuropsychologist both recommended this approach. In the event there is an accident - even if it's not her fault - the documentation may be needed in the event we were to be sued. The rehab hospital is not required to report her results to the RMV. AD is not on the list of reportable diseases (like epilepsy) that must be reported to the RMV.

She knows she will have to quit driving one day, and we'll deal with it when it happens. I'm sure it will be harder than we can imagine.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: SnowyLynne

Call the DPS & tell them what's going on,maybe they can help.....He needs to stop driving ASAP!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

I understand this is a "hot topic" but please, please understand, YOU,as your LO's spouse (because your aware of a AD diagnosis are now liable for their actions!) You are aware that they have an impairment.

Even the Alzheimer's Assoc is now telling people to stop the driving first thing after a diagnosis.

Just call your insurance company and ask them their feelings on the subject! jm29, don't call now cause good chance they wouldn't cover this accident!

By allowing your LO's to continue to drive you are setting up a scenario that can have deadly consequences to your LO's as well as people on the road. How will you feel if your LO's plowed thru a car load of kids? Not to mention killing them? Then if in when your LO had an accident, just the actions of post-accident scene will clue cops,witnesses etc into that there is an issue. So say the people your LO's hit, injured, (god forbid, killed, family) decide to sue You!? Cause guess what, they have the right to sue you because you have a liability because of your knowledge that your AD LO is impaired.

The way this was best explained to me by the ALZ Assoc was, Say a bartender, bar owner let a drunk person they had serve to drive off, they are held liable. Because they had knowledge that the person was impaired! We as caregiver are that Bar Owner, cause we have knowledge that our LO's are impaired.

If you were sued your home, savings etc could all be wiped out................. Not to say that the guilt over allowing this to happen and how it would eat at you if something did happen. Thankfully, my poor Dh has been a gem about this topic. He hasn't driven since a month after his diagnosis. By no means do I think the subject couldn't rear it's ugly head, but I do everything possible to ensure that it be unlikely.

Please stop living in denial for the sake of your AD LO, the innocent people on the road, side walks, etc and most of all for your self the spouse caregiver who could have even more taken from you if there was a accident.

I am sure I will get blasted for this one, but I don't care. I am 100% correct on this matter, no matter what you think. Blast away!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Carolina Songbird

quote:
Originally posted by jm29:
Next thing I know he had an accident. No one was hurt, I think. He does not remember much of it. He did not get a ticket and said the other person did not either. That is hard for me to believe that no one did.
If the cops responded you can get an accident report from headquarters that will show what happened, who was injured if any, and who was cited if any. I think you know you must get him out of the driver's seat, but seeing the facts in black and white may help your resolve.

This is a tough thing to do -- my thoughts are with you.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Linda G2

The driving issue is hard for all us. Not only does it take away the LO independance but also puts an added burden on the caregiver.

Our neuro said that he would call the DVM is we were not able to do it ourselves.

If I remember correctly, the alz.org store has some gadgets that disable part of the car so it cannot be driven. It has been a few years for us.

Take care,
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: meeko11

Taking away a loved one's drivers' license and thus independence has got to be the most difficult things we must do. When our time came my husband fought every inch of the way. When his license was finally revoked he would not accept it. I stole his car and sold mine. bought a new car that husband was not familiar with. Told him it came with only one ignition key. I hid the other and kept mine with me at all times. Many times husband "needed" the key for emergencies. Once I left the car at a shop to have a flat fixed and told the folks there not to give the key to anybody but me. Husband biked to the shop, paid the bill and demanded the key. I had called ahead and reminded them not to give up the key. By the time I hiked over they were about ready to call the police because my husband became so enraged. Unfortunately this action continued until I finally had to have him placed as a danger to himself and others.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

I think there are other discussions on the main caregiver forum about how to go about getting a driver's license revoked. That might take a while, though, and you need to do something in the meantime.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Pam W.

I have no great words of wisdom as I am going through exactly the same thing right now. My husband has always been an excellent driver until EOAD. Now he frightens me on the road. Our kids hate to ride with him. He is aware of problems, cannot have the radio on or even converse while driving as it is too much distraction. Recently he mentioned that we might have to say something to our insurance agent. He knows the time is approaching when he will have to give up this privilige, none the less it is very difficult. I wish in my state as well as others that there were processes inplace to help the families with this burden. I believe that once there is a diagnosis a driving evaluation needs to be done and administered every year and guidelines to remove driving priviliges when there is significant impairment (before a tragedy occurs).
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: meeko11

Giving up driving is almost like getting a diagnosis of a fatal disease ( which dementia is). It is a concrete reminder of things you can no longer do. It is a loss of freedom and having to admit to be needing the help of others. Very difficult for a type A personality which my husband was.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: arm

Rkg

I am sorry that I upset you so much. I do know that all the things that you wrote are true. That is why I had his son come and help me yesterday. He said that he is not going to drive and that He would get evaluated and if the doctors say he cannot drive he will not. I have no doubt that they will not let him drive. I took this as the warning I had been praying for to stop him from driving and thank God no one was hurt.

This is a hard thing for families to do. It is even harder when it hits them so young. I agree that the states need laws that when a person has this diagnosis they revolk the license or they are evaluated every six months. I think that someone on one of the other boards said that his was removed when he was diagnosed. I guess that I will now find out how to become an advocate that this be made a law in my state. It will help all of us not to have to handle this issue. Our loved ones do not meen to make it hard on us they just think that we are telling them what to do and they are losing control of everything.

But do not worry my husband will no longer be driving. He and I will be much closer than we ever thought. He told me that I was going to get sick of him. I joked and told him what made him think that I wasn't already. I told him and you will be sick of me also. I know that he will forget this conversation and that I will need to take measures with the other vehicles we have and I am prepared for this. I think. Thank you all so much,

Pam W

Call his doctor and talk to them and get them to take care of this for you. I know that they will. This is a stress that you do not need.
I will be praying for you.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

jm29 and Pam, hugs to both of you. Driving is the hot topic on any AD discussion forum.

jm29, since your husband has had a scare and is willing to stop, perhaps you could tell the doctors that you don't care what the evaluation results are, you want them to tell him he cannot drive. He may change his mind if he does pass the test and goes back to driving again.

We have been very lucky on this issue. My husband used to be an excellent driver. Since we've worked together almost since the day we met, we have often "car pooled", with him driving in the evening and me driving in the morning. I started noticing problems with his driving long before I noticed anything else. Like Pam's husband, he started being unable to have music playing or talk with me when he was driving -- he said he needed to concentrate. He would come up too fast on cars on the interstate, and abruptly brake at the last second, exclaiming that the other driver had slowed without warning. (I practically punched a hole in the floorboards, trying to brake from my side of the car and bracing for the crash.) He had trouble judging where cars were in the rear-view mirror. Three times, other drivers made unexpected moves and he reacted inappropriately ... fortunately without doing any harm.

When we went off daylight savings time, he had difficulty seeing at night due to cataracts. Rather than switching to him driving in the morning as we used to do, I just started driving both ways. He would still take the car to run errands during the day, though.

Then came the diagnosis. The neuro told him she was required by law to notify DMV. I don't know whether she forgot, or DMV decided he was OK because he had just aced his driving test a couple of weeks earlier (much to my amazement ... that's why I suggest that jm29 not leave this to chance.) In any event, we never heard from DMV. Fortunately, he was used to my doing most of the driving by then, and did not object when told by the doctor he couldn't drive any more. He says he likes to be chauffeured. His license is up for renewal this year, and he recently asked me -- totally out of the blue -- if I thought he should just get a photo ID instead. I did... Hopefully, he will still feel the same way when the time comes.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: DSM14

It is a very hard thing. In our minds, we know that our LO's are losing another part of their lives. And we constantly second guess ourselves wondering when the right time is.

JAB--there are several dents in the floorboards of the passenger side of my DH's vehicle as well. And I'm pretty sure the 'oh sh**' handle has a curve to it from me grabbing it so many times.

My DH was 53 when diagnosed. When I finally did decide it was time, and I had the conversation with DH....he was, understandably so, defensive. 'I'm a good driver! I've never been in an accident.'

I had to point out the dents in the rear fender where he backed into things a couple of times recently, and then I finally had to say:

'Look, I don't like this anymore than you do. I don't want to be the one that has to drive everyone everywhere. I want you to drive.
BUT, I don't want to be having this conversation next to one or all of our children's hospital bed or graveside. I don't know when that time will come when you can't make the safe, split second decision, and neither do you. It might be 10 more days, 10 more months, or even 10 more years. But my children's lives aren't worth the gamble, and neither is yours.'

He was mad at me for quite some time. That was over a year ago.
He still offers to drive when we go places, and occasionally gets mad at me still when I say no thank you.

But, I don't have to worry about him hurting himself, the children, or anyone else.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: dan

JM29,
Does your LO realize he has EOAD? Has he been diagnosed? Generally they know something is wrong but can't accept it. That was the case for my wife who was diagnosed at age 53. While it may be hard to take away the care keys just think how terrible it would be if there was an accident. GOD Bless!!
Dan
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: sheryl726

jm29, This is one of the more difficult items to deal with as it is their independence....gone.

Mother's doctor told her story of someone that had accident and even tho it was not her fault she was sued due to the fact that she had the disease and did not quit driving.

I feel that he may not remember that he has chosen to not drive. Good luck on this step.

One trick that I used was to make sure that her key was where she knew where it was and had key cut at dealership. It would unlock care, fit into ignition but would not start car. I just told her when she came back in from trying that we would get comeone out to check it really quick. It worked for our family as she just forgot to try and very rarely referred to it.
Hugs as you continue to deal with this on a daily bases and learn all the steps the hard way. Smiler
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

jm29, You did not upset me, really I just have issues with this subject. And believe me when I say it's not you, its everybody who lets this situation to continue. The, oh it's so tough attitude of caregivers puts me over the edge. This is one AD issue that "we" can't back down on. It's just a fact. So I am sorry I was so abrupt. But believe me, I won't give up on this issue Wink. As I said my Dh has been wonderful on this subject, but I know that it could easily rear it's ugly head but I am not in anyway gonna just go on blah zay about it. I have put in measures to protect against it, certainly all my efforts may not work but at least I have tried.

I have read so many post about this subject and yes, I know it is hard for people who have to give it up. I remember my non-AD 80 year old DGM being so pissed at my Dad when he took her car and keys! Whooooooo, Hurricane Ethel blew for almost a year around their house. And yes, every time this subject comes up on a post, I say, Thank You God. Because my dh truly has been wonderful from day one. Of course he has comments every once in a while, but has never been angry or hateful about it. (I know I am blessed). It will be 2 years since he drove next month. But as I said, I feel this is a subject "we" have to stay strong on. I hope everyone can. Letting our LO's have their way on this subject is not an option. Glad to hear your situation may have all things coming together for a resolution. Best of Luck! Rkg
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: arm

RKG
I am glad that you are there. It shows the rest of that we need to be strong and firm in this area. I am very adamant about it also. My mother in law made the comment that there are so many older people who should not be dirving and does not want to face that her 57 year old son should not be driving. I told her that they are not my family and responsibiliy but my husband her son is.

I think the way that this happened I should not have too many more problems with this issue. He was very scared. I will do what ever it takes to make sure that he is never behind the wheel of a car again. I have full support from our 4 children on this matter. He had a friend pick hiim up to take him golfing today. I can run some errands and get somethings done while he is with him. That is what family and friends need to do for us. They need to be supportive and give us a break every once in awhile.

I am so glad that this issue was resolved so easily for you. I hope and pray for all of us that each issue that comes up will go smoothly. I know that it won't, but we can hope and pray can't we.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

quote:
I talked with his doctor and he will no longer drive. She said she thought that we knew that he should not. Then she said it was up to the family to do this.

Oh, for shame! It is up to the doctor to tell the patient he can no longer drive. How is the family supposed to know these things? And why should the family take the blame? The doctor should write out a prescription telling him not to drive any more -- that, sometimes, can stop our loved ones from driving when nothing else will.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: arm

My husband does realize he has EOAD. But then again he doesn't sometimes. I talked with his doctor and he will no longer drive. She said she thought that we knew that he should not. Then she said it was up to the family to do this. I wish that they would do it right from the beginning. I know that I will be going over this with him on and off. I have always just got in the car since the diagnosis and driven instead of him. But when I would leave the house with out him, he would go somewhere. That will not happen anymore. I do like the idea that Sheryl726 had. I will do that if I think he is going when I leave him at home.
He always felt like if the girls and I went somewhere he needed to go somewhere himself. He found out today going with us that he did not like grocery shopping, wedding shopping, and the post office very much. I don't know what he thought we were doing when we would go somewhere. Our daughter is getting married in December, so he will be shopping for all kinds of things now. He said he enjoyed it. That will be great memories for all of us. So it is a blessing in disguise. He loves his children. He will not be left at home anymore either. I will drop him off to help his mom if he does not want to go with us. She is 81 and lives alone. She has it all together so she will make sure he doesn't go anywhere from her house.
I am so glad that we have this place to go and share our thoughts and worries and information on how to handle things.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: SnowyLynne

The thing about our driving is if we have an accident & either hurt someone or kill them the families can take everything you have & then some,so do not let your loved ones drive if they are having trouble........
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: KA

RKG - I'm just curious as to how you'll view this situation:

My partner is having her driver evalaution done by a qualified driving program at a rehab hospital. I fully expect that they will say she is fine to drive.

I drive with her and she is not having any trouble driving. She does not hesitate, she has no trouble gauging space, distance, braking times, navigating tricky intersections, etc.

We are getting the evaluation done and paying out of pocket in order to establish a baseline of her driving performance. We'll pay out of pocket periodically to make sure that a qualified person is documenting her driving capabilities.

I truly don't think that she needs to quit driving yet, but keep in mind we have a diagnosis VERY early onset with no other functional limitations. Short term memory issues and some aphasia, but no issues with ADL's, task sequencing, and this is a person who makes sure that she won't even go get the mail without earrings!

I've asked our attorney about the liability issues you've raised in terms of my me getting sued too in the event that she has an accident.

I won't have a problem taking the car or the key when the time comes, but I don't think the genetic testing results means that the car has to go immediately.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

quote:
Originally posted by folly:
It never ceases to amaze me how little help doctors often turn out to be with this problem.



It's a shame folly I agree! But have come to expect the medical profession being "behind the times" when it comes to our LO's. At least in our case they often stand there dumbfounded and of no help. Honestly I had one Nero tell me and I
quote:
Your up shit creek with out a paddle!
Like I didn't know that Wink
They really don't have all the answers and as laws etc change they are gonna be even further in the dark. I have had medical professionals (not nero's) tell me, he's tooooooooo young to have Alzheimer's. Ummmm No, he's not and if you had a clue you would realize there are much younger people who have it as well. They are shocked. I guess there are just to many disease's now days that they can't keep up with it all.



KA, I guess the only way to explain how I feel about your situation is that you/we know that our LO who has been diagnosed has a brain impairment. So just as I wouldn't let someone who has drank to much alcohol (a temporary impairment) drive I would let my LO with AD drive.

I understand that these driving evaluations, evaluate at the time of the test. But "we" know that our AD LO's have on days and off days, what if they have a "on day" for the evaluation? But the off days when they are driving? To me it's not worth anyone and I mean anyone getting hurt. We can't be assured that our LO's will have an "on day" every time they get behind the wheel.

Let me ask you, what brought on your LO even being diagnosed? What signs were being seen to even throw up red flags as to something being wrong?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: KA

quote:
Let me ask you, what brought on your LO even being diagnosed? What signs were being seen to even throw up red flags as to something being wrong?


Short term memory issues & word substitution or word finding difficulties were and still are the only issues. After exhaustive trips to the Neurology Clinic, treatment for depression, cognitive rehab - they decided to do the lumbar puncture. Presto Chango - genetic markers showed up.

We could have ignored the symptoms, or Primary Care Provider could have ignored or minimized our concerns! But we have been taken seriously and given excellent advice, care, treatment and follow up all through the process.

I really believe that if we hadn't pursued it, no one else would have thought there was a problem for a few more years.

For example, this morning before an appointment, she got up, managed her own meds, breakfast, coffee, shower, dressing, paid our bills, put stamps on the envelopes, gathered what she needed, made a shopping list, and headed out the door. She also called the neuropsychiatrist to arrange for Namenda to be called into local pharmacy AND to our mail order Rx company since there will be a lapse between the time mail order co. fills & mails it. Yes, with her earrings on!

I hear your concern, and I'm not trying to be argumentative, I'm just saying that no one - not our neurolgist, neuropsychiatrist, neuropsychologist or PCP has said she needed to quit driving. And, yes we have discussed it with all of them! They all applaud our decision to have baseline testing done in order to help us measure her performance over time.

It's not a good day/bad day or good minute/bad minute thing here yet. But I'm prepared to watch for those signs.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: folly

It never ceases to amaze me how little help doctors often turn out to be with this problem.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: meeko11

"aarp stop driving" If you Google this you can get some really helpful info.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: deed

Rkg is ABSOLUTELY RIGHT!!

Remember it is not about you or your LO!! It is about everyone on or around the roadways!!

The HARDEST thing I have ever done and such ugly conversations afterwards..and they still continue but easier to get the subject changed now! IT HAD TO HAPPEN!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: arm

Everyone is so right. My Dh has trouble with left and right and front and back. I will say it is in the cabinet behind you and he will reach in front of him. He was lost numerous times while driving. Even if they seem to drive fine when they get frustrated it is even harder for them to make decisions. I really wish that they would make it to where if you have a diagnosis that you are not able to drive at that point. It is for their safety and everyone elses on the road. Someone said ask yourself if you had a small child would you let that person drive them. If you answer no the they should not be driving even just themselves. I would not let my husband drive when I was with him and I should have taken the steps sooner for him not to drive at all.

It is hard, I just had to get up early to take him to meet my dad and brother in law to play golf. But it is worth it. He has seemed like a burden was lifted off of his shoulders since he was told he could not drive. It has lifted a burden off of mine and our childrens shoulders also. I think he was hoping someone would make that decision for him. We enjoyed a wonderful afternoon of running errands together. Yes, I had to slow down and make adjustments for him being with me, but it is time that I will have with him.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

deed, hi! You're new ... well, at least new to posting. I see you've been lurking for quite some time now. Tell us about yourself, and your LO. Is there anything we can do to help?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

KA, my thought, even if as you say mild short term memory and word substitution issues, What if she has a moment where she forgets whats the gas pedal versus the brake pedal? I too don't want to be argumentative but hope to make people aware that "we" never know when that time will come. Never! Is it worth it?


Years before my DH was diagnosed (this is someone who drove far more miles than any 3 people would in a years time) due to his job's, business. Showed signs of driving confusion on a couple of occasions, looking back I now know that it was the AD coming on...........

The first such issue occurred when we were driving down the highway pulling a utility trailer, there was this loud bang, we both looked at each other like what? He proceeded to pull over and get out of the truck without putting the truck in park! (one quick swift motion) so fast so that I had barely gotten my seat belt undone, He was out of the truck and walking back towards the trailer............. The truck was rolling, I thankfully was able to jump over the console and hit the brake and throw the truck in park. Believe me, at this point I wasn't even on board that there were issues. I knew something was up but in no way ever suspected AD, NEVER! And it was almost 4 years later that he was diagnosed. As I said, it's looking back that I see, this scenario was just the beginning of what was coming. So from my point of view we just never know when that "substitution" of the little things becomes a substitution of the big things. We know that their reasoning button is broken, it doesn't mean our is.....

Do you think that I wanted to take yet another thing from my Dh? He was diagnosed at 53, but honestly if I could have gotten the Doctors to wake up to the fact that there were issues long before they had their "wake up call" then he would of/ should of been diagnosed years before. For my Dh it has never been about short term memory stuff. In fact he, as far as short term memory stuff up until recently often times remembers more than I do Roll Eyes . That is one reason the medical professionals missed that he had issues. He was highly intelligent and most likely even up until the last year or so, could have held his own at a Mensa meeting, I on the other hand wouldn't get past the front door Big Grin. Just because he was so smart and didn't look like he has AD doesn't mean he doesn't. I hope this helps to make my point more clear.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: arm

Well, it did not take long. What 1 week? He is not wanting to drive the cars or the truck, he wants a motorcycle or scooter. I know that he will not be able to get anywhere to buy one of these so that is ok. But now I am going to have to deal with this issue coming up that he wants one. He also wants to ride his bike to town and around. We live 8 miles out side of our little town. We are 50 miles outside of Atlanta, There is alot of traffic on our town roads. I told him that I would take him to this lake down the street that has paths and he could ride, walk or run there. He said it was not long enough. Just say a few prayers for me this is going to be a long time issue. The other day I was cleaning and still in my PJ's and he want to get AT&T to look at his phone that he broke again, I said as soon as I clean the floor and get dressed we will go. He sat in his chair and said "I could have walked there by now". I said get dressed or I don't care if you get dressed, I will take you in my PJ's. Then he said he could wait. He knew that it was not a pretty sight. One week and driving Mr. Daisy is not fun. I hope you know that I am just finding a little humor. I love my husband.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

quote:
Originally posted by jm29:
One week and driving Mr. Daisy is not fun. I hope you know that I am just finding a little humor. I love my husband.



Oh jm, we know! Hang in there it's more than worth having to drive them everywhere. It's one thing I hate that I am the only driver now. But it's just part of this AD journey that has to be. I swear when I get older I am gonna be rich enough to have a full time driver........... (yea right!)
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: KA

Driving Update:

My LO passed her driving test with 100% in all areas.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:06 PM
Originally posted by: rholl1948

I am glad that your DH is not driving anymore, I know it is one of the hardest things to do to take that part of their independence away. Keep hanging onto the humor. It is sometimes the only thing that keeps us going when things seem unbearable. I like the "driving Mr Daisy"
 
× Close Menu