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Just diagnosied - How can I be sure
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: Bjblack

We were jsut told yesterday that my husband has Early Onset Dementia/Alzheimers. The doctor said he believes that it is alzheimers but he can not prove it. He has started him on Aricept. I guess I am very confused, What does he mean when he says "I can not prove it". We have had multiple CT scans, MRIs, and blood work as well as simple test that involve drawing and word association. What other tests can be done so that we feel more comfortable with this diagnosis? I guess we are jsut confused to hear a doctor say he is going to treat for somethign but he can not prove what it is. Since we are very new to this does this sound normal?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

My DH who did not have early onset, had lesions in the brain, and his brain had shrunk. Ask your doctor what indications they saw.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Cpkebaseballdad

As I understand it, Alzheimers Dementia can only be definitively diagnosed upon autopsy. The brain develops "tangles and placques" which cannot be seen by imaging such as x-ray or CT scan. There are new tests being developed which hold promise for more definitie diagnosis at significantly earlier stages.

There is a wonderful site called Memory Commons that is associated with the University of Virgina school of medicine. The link is:

http://www.memorycommons.org/

You might take a look.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: So Sad

Bj, My husband is 57 and I have taken him to a battery of tests also, MMSE 3 times, bloodwork 3 times, CAT scan, MRI, stress test, angiogram, sleep apnea test 2 times, and so forth, also same diagnosis as your husband. The Aricept made him sick, but Namenda seems to be working well for now. I get frustrated, we drive 2 hours each way, sometimes leaving at 6:00 a.m. to get to the Neurologist, and there are some visits that seem pretty informative and others that it almost feels like they are guessing. It is almost like they are afraid to tell me what they think. The last visit I asked what stage they feel he is in and they told me moderate, he actually scored better on the mmse test then the time before due to the Namenda. I know something is wrong and they know something is wrong, but I guess there are so many forms of dementia it is hard for them to be certain. I am glad you have found this website, it has helped me for information and emotional support.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: sf

Bj, I'm so sorry to hear that you've had this terrible diagnosis, I know you and your husband are both still reeling. My own husband was diagnosed with early onset a 57. Medications like Aricept and Namenda are effective for many people, I hope they are for him too.
My understanding is that AD can be diagnosed with 90% probability, but only with 100% confidence by examining the brain, a brain biopsy. The procedure is invasive and dangerous and so the benefit (100% certainty) doesn't outweigh the risk of harming the patient. Neurologists use a combination of tests to get to 90% confidence: family history, cognitive testing, brain scans, blood work, and sometimes even spinal taps to look for the proteins that are a by-product of AD.
They must first rule out other conditions that could result in the same symptoms. Hope this helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

Bj and Cpkebaseballdad, Welcome to you both. Sorry you had to search out this information, but I hope you find support and understanding here.

Bj, as for what other test, the only other one I know of is a Pet Scan, but just like the others it's not a 100%

My Dh was diagnosed with EOAD at 53, though there were signs years before the diagnosis. You will find on this forum many who are younger that have been diagnosed. It's sad, but with a good Nero and AD drugs you can stave off the effects of AD for years to come. At least that is what we hope for!

As your DH's Nero stated Bj there is no proof, I only know of one other test that is said to be the best way to determine (though it's not set in stone with it either!) That is a Pet Scan. My Dh had all of the above.



My understanding is that all the test, they do to our LO's are only discounting other disease/health issues that may have the same memory issues as AD, so by giving all the different test they are discounting them and assuming it's AD or another type of dementia. My understanding also is that the only true diagnosis is an autopsy.


You don't actually say what lead your Dh to seek a Nero in the first place. But I will assume that it's as to what lead most of our spouses to seek answers. So I would think that the blood work up, Ct and MRI's would have discounted all other known brain issues which lead the Nero to believe that it's AD. Though of course, it's not 100%. Sorry, I know it's frustrating but that is what we have to go by.

No matter what, you have found a place where we are all in the same boat, just on different levels. Hang in there! Give yourself time to absorb the diagnosis then throw yourself into reading anything you can get your hands on. But let me state here and now, you can survive this and with Grace and Love you can create the best possible journey for your DH. (lot's of Love!)
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Hi Newbies,
Welcome to our site. And we are all so sorry for what brings you here.

A great book about the testing process is The Alzheimer's Action Plan by Doraiswamy and Gwyther from Duke. If your library doesn't have it, ask them to try the interlibrary loan. Bjblack, did your husband also have a neuro-psychological test? What you did describe was a mini mental test which if problems are encountered, needs to be followed up with a complete battery. This will give indications of the type of dementia. This information is vitally important as you will read in the above book. Alzheimer's, Aricept is fine. (I've been on it four years plus.) Other dementias, it is contraindicated.

Oh yes, I tried that line about you can't diagnose AD until death and I'm not dead. And I was, so gently, told that the pattern of answers I gave, fit the pattern of those diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

My sympathies to both of you, if the diagnostic procedure is complete and that was the result. Both of you, get your breath and begin to fight.
Investigate what I call my Best Practices. Have hubby join us on the 'I've got Alzheimer's' link. Learn all you can. Make friends with your local Alzheimer's Chapter.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

Cpkebaseballdad, we're gonna have to come up with a good abbreviation for your name. What a mouthful! Big Grin

You appear to be a knowledgeable soul. Tell us about you and your loved one.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Bjblack

Thanks for the info. I will tell you, about 6 months ago my husband and I were driving home on a road that he had driven everyday back and forth to work for the past six years and he pulled over and asked me if I knew where the turn was to get to our house and to be honest I looked at him as if he were joking, sadly he was not joking. At that point I looked for any excuse possible for him to be so confused. I started noticing things that did not make sense, we would have conversations that he would later swear we never had. It was causing problems in our marraige because I thought he was either no telling me the truth or frankly did not pay attention to our conversations. About a month after the first incident he left our house to run an errand that should have been very simple but he called me about an hour later and was on the other side of town and was not sure what he had gone there for. Again I thought he was joking. I scheduled an appt with his regular doctor and so began the tests. We have seen the doctor about every two weeks for the last 4 months and he has done the MMSE test twice and the last one was better than the first one. It seems like somedays he is just fine and then the next day he can't be trusted to go out alone. I spoke with his sister that lives in another state after getting the diagnosis and she called him a few minutes later and told him not to take any of the medicine and not to believe the diagnosis becuase he was tooyoung for that and that I probably just pressured the doctor into the diagnosis. It really bothered me to think that I am the one with him everyday and I see what is happening and she might speak to him once a month. It actually made me doubt myself and the doctors.
Thanks for being someone to talk to, sometimes no one else understands.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

Bj, hi, welcome to the forum. Cpkebaseballdad is correct. There is no definitive test that proves someone has Alzheimer's, aside from autopsy of the brain. The tests that your husband had were to rule out the many hundreds of other disorders that might be causing his symptoms. A skilled team can diagnose AD with ~90-95% accuracy. None of us actually got a diagnosis of "AD" -- at most, we got a diagnosis of "probable AD".

We talked about the tests that are done, and some of the things that they look for, at:
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...434077877#9434077877

I am very sorry you've been given this news ... I know how devastating it is. And in the early stages, as your husband's symptoms bounce around, there will be many days when he seems so very normal that you'll question the diagnosis all over again.

The thing to do now is to learn as much as you can.

Since the diagnosis is so very recent, you may find the First Steps article helpful:
http://alzheimers.boomja.com/C...rst-Steps-61311.html

Also, Jennifer Ghent-Fuller's article, "Understanding the Dementia Experience":
http://alzheimers.boomja.com/A...xperience-59731.html

And Coach Broyle's Playbook:
http://www.alzheimersplaybook.com/
The link for the free .pdf is in the upper right-hand corner of the page

Jolene Brackey's book, "Creating Moments of Joy". It's great -- full of very practical, simple advice on how to make our loved ones feel loved, happy, and safe:
http://www.enhancedmoments.com/
Click on "Products" and scroll down.

The Savvy Caregiver training program from:
http://www.caresprogram.com
I think you can get a 20% discount with code AADVD20. Or you could ask to join the group of caregivers who are passing the training program DVDs around:
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...14102241/m/506304424


In addition to the standard AD meds, there are plenty of things you can do to try to slow down the course of the disease, including:

(1) Sticking as closely as you can to a Mediterranean diet (with wine and nuts), which has been shown to help prevent/delay the onset of AD, and also slow its progression. See:

http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...=124104521#124104521

http://alzheimers.boomja.com/A...ean-Diet-231673.html

Basically, it involves:
- High intake of vegetables, legumes, fruits, and cereals
- High intake of unsaturated fatty acids (mostly in the form of olive oil)
- Low intake of saturated fatty acids
- Moderately high intake of fish
- Low-to-moderate intake of dairy products (mostly cheese or yogurt)
- Low intake of meat and poultry
- A regular but moderate amount of ethanol, primarily in the form of wine and generally during meals

To that, I would add eating a quarter cup of nuts every day -- quite a few studies have found they're very good for you.

Also, olive oil is very good for salad dressings etc, but not so much so for cooking especially at higher temps. Use canola oil for that, or a mix of the two. (I've seen plenty of products that contain olive and canola oils.)

Avoid hydrogenated fats and trans fats like the plague.

(2) Lots of physical exercise ... there is quite a bit of evidence it can help prevent/delay onset.

(3) Lots of exercise for the brain -- activities that involve learning something new. I've seen some reports that learning new things coupled with using a computer can be particularly helpful.

(4) Socialization, doing things with friends and family.

(5) Plenty of rest.

(6) NO SMOKING!!! and avoid air pollution as much as possible.

(7) Do whatever you can do to minimize stress ... and help your husband learn and practice stress reduction techniques (and practice them yourself!!!) Many of us can confirm that stress exacerbates cognitive dysfunction; and researchers are beginning to think that prolonged, severe stress can actually trigger AD.


And, of course, there are clinical trials. There are many promising new drugs in the pipeline, and most clinical trials will accept patients 55 and older; some even accept patients as young as 50. If you'd like more info on what's recruiting in your area, let us know where you live.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

We had that same problem with my DH's disbelieving sisters, and I decided to just keep them out of the loop. They will find out soon enough, and we don't need that crap ('scuse me) on top of everything else. Your DH's sister is not the doctor, and what makes her think you need her to help you figure it out? She is pretty presumptious.

Okay, having been so judgmental, I will now say that she is having her own problems of coping with your news. She is in denial. I guess I don't really blame her, but you still don't need that. Maybe you could tell her that you don't have the time nor inclination to try to convince her. I finally realized that to try to convince my DH's sisters, I had to recite things he did, and that was compromising his dignity. I didn't want to do that. Now I don't.

You poor lady; you have so much to deal with having children at home. What an education you will be getting, but you have come to the right place. You will love the members here as they help you through it. I wish you every good blessing.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Hi BJ,
Just a comment on the comment re the mimi-mental. The reply don't you think I know what day it is. Or whatever smart reply a person makes is most often a defensive reply because they don't know the answer. And any good diagnostician, while enjoying the retort, knows this.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Bjblack

Well, the mmse seems kinda weird anyway but I guess to me it would but my husband says thinks like, do they just think I am stupid or what, you have told me everyday for the last week we have and appt on so and so day and then they ask me what day it is like I would not know. Well, the truth is yes I do tell him everyday for a week when his appt is because he asks everyday when it is so on that particular day he knows what day it is but maybe not what day it is the next day. My husband seems to get hung up on numbers, if his appt was on the 3rd he would try to go on the 3rd, 13th, 23rd or the 30th just because he knows that it has a 3 in it. We still have 4 children at home ranging in age from 8 to 20 and sometimes it feels like I have 5 at home.

The issue with the faily members has really gotten to me. It makes me want to say..."ok, I will bring him to stay with you and you call me when you realize I am not making up stories about him." I am not sure if this is normal or if it is just me being defensive. His sister suggested that I keep a journal and I can call and review it with her so that she can "help" me determine if it is something "we" should be concerned about. I just wonder if she thinks she can talk us out of the diagnosis as if we just decided that we wanted him to have EOAD instead of a haircut that day.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Rkg

quote:
Originally posted by Bjblack:

The issue with the faily members has really gotten to me. It makes me want to say..."ok, I will bring him to stay with you and you call me when you realize I am not making up stories about him."

That is always been my theory! They think there is nothing wrong, let them deal with it! Boy I hate family denial! I basically told my MIL that her denial was not getting my DH, her son anywhere so if she wanted to keep her shit up, I would do exactly that, She needed to get on board or take over. Her choice! I wasn't gonna fight her and help my Dh.

I am not sure if this is normal or if it is just me being defensive. His sister suggested that I keep a journal and I can call and review it with her so that she can "help" me determine if it is something "we" should be concerned about.

Unfortunately it can be a "normal family response". His sister actually said that? Really? Oh good luck with that crazy in-law........


Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

Well, it sounds as if your journey is starting out in a very typical way ... including interfering relatives. Sigh.

It doesn't help that our loved ones can often compensate when interacting with people they don't see very often. They appear to be much better than they are. However, it quickly tires them out, and then the caregiver has to deal with hours, or days, of worse symptoms.

We don't call AD the roller coaster ride for nothing.

(Many of us have grown to loathe the MMSE. Results can bounce around all over the place, and be affected by all sorts of different things. It has some usefulness in screening, to see if there is reason to do thorough testing. Some.)
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

Now let me continue with Sheryl's discussion about stimulating the brain and about social filters as we had the carpets cleaned yesterday, and I so am not looking forward to putting the furniture back. My back is killing me.

I received the keyboard that I ordered to put the music for the song I wrote down on paper. Last night we were watching a program on the brain that explained what went on in the brain as we learn new things. It was quite exciting. Too bad I can't remember it to share as it was rather complex, but it did give me hope that doing something is better than vegging out.

I said to DH that this was one reason I bought the keyboard so that we could learn something new. He agreed that he had been happy to see it and intended to play around with it. So actually, I will be happy to get the furniture put back so I can get it out.

Re the social filters, I was telling DD#1 about some of the conversations we have had on the board, and she made a comment that made me wonder. At a later date I brought it up. She said that she was concerned about, well, crazy people I might be conversing with. I explained about the Administrators overseeing the board and how they sometimes remove some material, etc.; also that everything is anonymous--that some people included emails, but that I didn't.

She then told me that I should realize that she is losing her social filters (she has MS) and that she may just blurt out something without thinking. Well, heck, I do that without any excuse.

Anyway, she's now okay with my receiving comfort from my friends here. I haven't discussed this with any of the other girls as I see no need, but it is nice to be able to share some of the stories and interaction from the board with someone in real life. She even saw my user name, but said not to worry; she doesn't remember anything. I wish I didn't have to deal with DH so much as DD also needs my support. Frowner

Well, sorry. I do get carried away sometimes, but I hope others are helped by the discussions.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

quote:
(3) Lots of exercise for the brain -- activities that involve learning something new. I've seen some reports that learning new things coupled with using a computer can be particularly helpful.

(4) Socialization, doing things with friends and family.


Looking back, you'll probably remember other instances that just weren't quite right, now that you have the diagnosis.

In DH's case, he also got lost coming home on a road that he'd driven 30 years.

You'll probably needing to decide pretty quick whether he should continue to drive. Their reactions aren't as quick, their Peripheral vision not as good, and in some states they might not be insured once that diagnosis is in his records, our Dr. told us. My DH (dear hubby) almost T-boned another car at an intersection when he didn't see the red light.

One thing I learned here is that too many wait too long to start Adult Day Care. It's a good place to stimulate their brain with games, exercise and crafts. It also gives you time off! It took a month for our local group to get through their paperwork but he now goes on Tues and Thur from 10-3. It provides a free shuttle bus and lunch. Total time gone is about from 9:30-3:00. Time I dearly needed just for myself or appointments!

It's a big adjustment to suddenly go to 24/7 caregiving. My hubby still goes for walks but always carries his ID. He hasn't gotten lost, but just in case....I still haven't gotten him an ID bracelet, but that's on my list.

We've had family get togethers which are important while he's still not so bad, but the family can see it, some say in his eyes. In our case, he's had a brother already pass with it so it wasn't a surprise.

How is his speech? Searching for words becomes more advanced. In my DH's case, he did become quite the "Chatty Daddy" starting up long, convoluted conversations with strangers that included lots of private, family information. It was a change in his basic personality of being a quiet, introspective man, into this Chatty Daddy person.

That has now passed too, as it's difficult for him to always find the words. It was described to me as losing his 'social filters' and making sometimes inappropriate comments. He told our son "your kids are fat"....(well, they are...too much soda? LOL)

You'll get more information here, probably, than at any support group you can find, and this discussion board is 24/7.

Jump on in, we are all in this together.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Getting lost twice, in my mind, qualifies as no longer driving alone. And when you are with him, how relaxed are you? What clues do you see that he misses? You can pull down 'find' and put in 'safe to drive?'
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Lurk:
No, I only had the mini test once, but I found myself trying to get to sleep and subtracting by sevens. A friend, whose mom has AD, was getting an annual mini. She also admitted to deliberately practicing some of the items. Since most doctors go by totals, then practicing a few makes the test worthless.

That being said, there are some items on the test that practicing won't help. I have no short term memory, so that's an F. And that figure, which requires no memory, was beyond me last time I tried.

I did have the original neuro-psych and a follow up two years later. It was time for another this fall, but something more important was going on and that had to followed through. At this point, for me, I'm not sure that the follow up does anything but satisfy my own curiosity.

My neuro does throw memory questions at me.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

My neuro told me that even if I practiced between exams, it would tell him something about how my brain functions. That was when I was seeing him. My DH would not be able to practice between sessions, but then he has only had two mini-tests. I expect, Mimi, that you have had a lot since you have been fighting the good fight for a long time.

Ladies, you beat me to the punch. My comment was in reply to Mimi's last one about the mini-test. I must be slow. Two posts popped up while I was composing. Smiler
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Hi again BJ,
Please read the book I recommended above: The Alzheimer's Action Plan.

And improvements can be a result of the meds and/or the variations from day to day. The mini-mental is NOT a good instrument for such measurements. It's only designed as a screening tool. Some of it's measures are much too easy to practice between exams.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

quote:
She then told me that I should realize that she is losing her social filters

Yep, like my tall, good-looking DH announcing at the San Diego airport "I've gotta PEE", after we cleared security this weekend! And then after we found a place to sit in the waiting area he proceed to roll over on one cheek and 'rip one off'!

Yep Smiler He's come a long way down since his days of being a General Manager...back in the day. LOL
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

quote:
I'm now pretty adept at subtracting by sevens


I salute you! I'm slow at even adding by 7's, let alone subtracting! Smiler
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

Okay, I'll admit it; I'm now pretty adept at subtracting by sevens. And if I had time, I would practice everything I could think of, subtracting by fours, multiplication tables, diagramming sentences, anything at all. I am working on learning Spanish, and I want to learn about music.

However, if you don't have short term memory, Mimi, I can't even imagine how you function--lots of notes everywhere? When I began using the Day Timer, I realized how much I do rely on short-term memory, and it made me feel a little better about occasionally forgetting things. Oh, my, I am learning so much. Dear Mimi, you (and others in your circumsance) are an inspiration to us all.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: lurk

Sheryl, your adventures at the airport made me decide not to visit DD#3 in Derwood, MD. Smiler

We also have lots of 350 piece puzzles on hand. When I ask, DH says, no, he doesn't want to do one. We have enough other things to do right now, but when we get cabin fever in January we will get one out. The problem is that he can't stop until it is done and his body is a mess from all that scrunching over. I'll have to work on that before we start. He's never known the meaning of moderation in all things.

So, would you go on another airport trip?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

My hubby enjoys playing Solitaire and doing puzzles. About 300 pieces are the size that are successful for him. Sometimes it takes him 8 hours, depending on how complicated they are.

He also insists on turning the Solitaire 'draw' pile over one at a time. We've learned to choose our battles on this board, so I just let him do it. Who cares if it's usually 3 at a time. 1 at a time also insures more success.

I've also set him up with a cardtable in an area with lots of lights.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

Sheryl, in case you haven't seen it, there's a pretty good article about traveling with an ADLO at:
http://alzheimers.boomja.com/A...d-Travel-245692.html
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

quote:
I found myself trying to get to sleep and subtracting by sevens.

I was doing that after my husband was first tested ... durned if I didn't end up at a different number every time. Big Grin Finally, a friend told me the secret: subtract 10 and add 3. Works much better!

Our last visit to the geri (who is associated with the AD Research Center at the university), he announced that my husband hadn't had an MMSE in quite a while, and he intends to do one on our next visit. I asked why. (My husband simply loathes being tested now, after two clinical trials and a longitudinal study. Enough is enough.) Doc answered that he could use the results to predict where my husband will be a couple of years from now. Eeker When I finished rolling around on the floor in hysterics, I said, "Really? Good luck with that."

Heck, I can't predict where my husband will be a couple of hours from now.

Doc looked a little sheepish. I wonder if he realizes he will not be giving my husband an MMSE on our next visit...
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

quote:
I will have to go back and look up some of our discussions about the best incontinence products as I thought I remembered WalMart brand being recommended so that's what I'd bought.

The product that's best depends on the ADLO. What fits one person may leak on another. There are some good (caregiver recommended) online companies that specialize in incontinence products at:
http://alzheimers.boomja.com/I...7s-Patients-386.html
They have experts you can talk to about your specific needs, good service, good products. Some will send free samples for you to test ... at least one sells a "starter kit" that contains a variety of products for you to try out.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

quote:
We also have lots of 350 piece puzzles on hand.



Get the 100 pc ones from the Dollar Tree, instead. They take about an hour, usually. Remember, for success, it's good to not have a lot of water, or sky, as those are harder to accomplish.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

quote:
So, would you go on another airport trip?

Yes, we are going to SoCal again to help our custodial son with babysitting 7yr twins on part of their Christmas Break as he still has to work and has no babysitters that he knows in that area.

I've learned that I need DH to go through security first so I can see where he is. (Remember I lost him in August when he had a 'blowout' in the bathroom and it took a long time for him to clean up and change his clothing). I thought he was right behind me but had veered off into a bathroom without me seeing him, while I was putting my shoes back on.

This time He'd agreed to travel in Pull Ups and it wasn't an issue going and probably would have been OK if I'd been more diligent about the consequences of drinking all those liquids, waiting for take off. As it was, he didn't have to actually use the Pull Ups until we were landed and waiting to disembark. By then the bathrooms were locked. Next time I'll have him make a potty trip half way through the flight if he's had a lot to drink. Since it was just urine, it was no biggie, but if it had been more, I might have other thoughts. When he expressed concern about wetting his pants I calmly (like I'd been told on this board) explained that's what they were for Smiler

The Dr. does have him on Imodium each day now and I'd certainly recommend that for travel days now, just in case. Dealing with diarrhea and the smell would be a WHOLE different problem!!

His announcement of "I've got to PEE" was only to me, not the general area. (It just SEEMED like it was loudSmiler

Even the guy he started chatting up next to us in the waiting area said "I don't mind" when hubby had gone on one of his bathroom walks and I explained that he had Alz and was likely to continue his chattering. Maybe people really are getting more tolerant/knowledgeable?

I will have to go back and look up some of our discussions about the best incontinence products as I thought I remembered WalMart brand being recommended so that's what I'd bought. I think they are called Assurance?

Well, by the time he filled them in the plane and then made the long walk through the big Seattle Airport and to the baggage area, it was leaking through his clothing. Fortunately, he had some some white linen-type pants and it didn't show like it might have in other clothing. I'd also had him wear a longer jacket (planning ahead) by telling him it was going to be cold when we returned. Yep, 10 day forecast was right on the mark at 44 degrees.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: LCB

quote:
I had to recite things he did, and that was compromising his dignity.


I think this was from Lurk. I just want you all to know I am here, reading, learning, and little zingers like the above are adding up, making me feel better. Right now there is too much to sort out, but I think you all for being here.

LCB
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Jab,
A few years ago there was a discussion on the boards about your method with sevens. He used it and considered it cheating. My response, any one who still has enough smarts about that deserves to score.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: SherylS

Indeed!!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:51 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

How funny, Mimi!

I think practicing for the MMSE isn't cheating, either. If the loved one can learn enough, remember enough, from practicing, then that should count, too! Wink
 
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