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Scared of my future!
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: St0ckTrader

I am a 40 year old divorced male. Last year my father was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimers at the age of 70. At the time of his diagnosis he was working full time and was in excellent health. He is still in excellent health and is doing well with medications and the support of my mother, myself and my brothers. His doctors said that most likely he had been living with E.O.A. for many years, but had done a great job of keeping his memory problems hidden from everyone.

I am not scared of dealing with my fathers Alzheimers, it is the fear that I could get or already have early onset Alzheimers. I have a teenaged son and a successful career. I don't know what I would do if I was diagnosed with E.O.A. at this age? The problem for me is that I will be thinking of something that I need to do and then forget what I was thinking about. Most of the time I remember after a little while, but sometimes I can't recall at all. I am noticing this happening on a more frequent basis, like once every day or two. I don't have any other memory problems with the exception of not remembering many events in my life that occured over 20 years ago. I also have a tough time remembering the names of new people that I meet. I don't have any problems remembering important numbers (like passwords) and places. Actually my visual memory is extremely good.

I just don't think I am prepared to go through testing knowing there is a chance that I could be diagnosed with E.O.A.

What should I do?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: meramac12

Stock Trader

We all feel the same-the fear of having the disease. It comes from living with it each day. But just remember Stress can cause a lot of the same things. When I am really stressed I can't remember a lot-do I have the start of ALZ not sure but I know that Stress can cause us to not remember things. Seems like you have the right things working. Just keep your mind active. And welcome to the site.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jackie28

Stock Trader,

You and I are in the same boat. My father was diagnosed with EOA around the age of 60 (~5 years ago). Hindsight tells us he probably had symptoms for a few years before that. We think his dad had the disease, too (although he wasn't formally diagnosed).

I just turned 30 and am a grad student preparing myself for a career that will give me the life I want. But I have so much I want to do with my life that I'm putting off because of school and I wonder just how much time I have. In careers like yours and mine, we're valued for our mental acuity - so thoughts that the disease might already be in process are especially stressful.

I don't have an answer for you because I'm just as scared. But I guess the best we can do is focus on enjoying life now so that we have fewer regrets if and when we get this disease. Easy to say, but tough to do.

I joined this site this morning because of the horrible dreams I had last night. I realize now that even though I am not a direct caregiver, I need support too. So you and I should also do our best to build our support networks and use them.

All my best to you,
Jackie
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Kris B.

Stock Trader -- I have AD and my son is 23 and in law school. I worry about him getting the disease as well, but you can't worry about it all the time. Stress does do crazy things to your memory and it seems like you might be experiencing stress related symptoms. Several doctors that I have heard speak on this particular subject, usually give a standard answer when people ask questions like this and it is -- if you remember that you are having memory problems, you don't usually have Alzheimer's. I'm not sure if this is technically correct but it makes sense to some degree.

I speak on behalf of the Alzheimer's Association quite a bit and I used to go through then 10 signs of Alzheimer's in my talks. But, after I finished with it, everyone in the room then thought they had Alzheimer's so I stopped doing that!

Most doctors won't go through the testing procedure on you if you don't exhibit more signs than you state in your message.

I know you worry about it but go easy on yourself. You need to be strong for your dad.

Kris B.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Kris B.

Jackie -- I notice you are in Atlanta. I am in Athens. I hope that you are using the resources that the Georgia Alzheimer's Assn. has. There are many of us in the Atlanta area that have early on-set Alzheimer's and they have been a big help to us. If you need information please let me know and I'll be glad to help direct you. They have been a solid rock for me and my family. You can email me at krisbga@hotmail.com if you would like.

My best to you.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Twice Blessed

I am curious, just how did they come to this conclusion that it was EOAD and not just AD?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jackie28

Kris - thank you! I may take you up on that.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Twice Blessed

Most AD is not hereditary so I would not concern myself. I worry much more about getting in a car wreck..and don't actually worry about that either! We all die of something, but until that time, I intend to live each blessed day God has given me and let Him take care of tomorrow!
I still would like to know why they decided a man 70, has EOAD if he was just diagnosed
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: St0ckTrader

Twice Blessed,

Thank you for asking the question about the diagnosis of EOAD with my father. I spoke to my mother about it and she clarified that he actually has Dementia. She has been calling it early stage Alzheimers. I am still learning a lot about all this.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: St0ckTrader

Thank you all for your kind words. I just have to remain strong and not worry about it. If it happens, it happens. I know that I am lucky to have a close, caring family.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: DMax

Stock Trader,
I feel many of the same things that you do. My father has Alzheimer's disease and was diagnosed at age 67. Every time I have a some type of memory lapse (which is frequently) I'm convinced that I have AD! Thanks to advice on this site, I am trying to just live my life without worrying about it so much. I am doing what I can to prevent it, exercising, watching my diet, stimulating my brain. I am also looking into getting long term care insurance (I'm only 38, but I need the peace of mind) because we didn't do this for my father, and it was a mistake. I have already wasted too much time worrying/stressing about whether AD will happen to me, and I don't want to waste any more of my life like that. I don't want that for you, either. Just enjoy your time with your son and know that every day they are developing better treatments. I wish you all the best.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: MarionG

Yes it scary to think u might have alzheimers
Im glad James says new help coming for all.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Twice Blessed

Dementia is like am umbrella. There are around 80 different types. Alzheimer's is only one type. When you have early onset, it starts before the age of 65. So, relax. You probably have nothing to worry about concerning yourself. Just spend time loving your dad and helping your mom. Smiler
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: jamesmn

Stock Trader,

I was diagnosed with Early AD this paast year - I am 46, and like you had a very successful career. I also have two daughters in college.

One of the things you can do to prepare - not only for this, but for all contingencies, is to make sure you have some key financial planning things squared away. Fortunately for me, I have very good diasbility insurance, and made sure I paid the premiums myself, on an after-tax basis. In doing so, the disability income I receive is tax-free, and as such provides almost 95% of my pre-diagnosis salary (I no longer get bonuses or stock options, however...)

In addition, you may want to prepare your Advance Healthcare Directives, and Durable Powers of Attorney. And finally, if you honestly believe this is a possibility for your future, yo umay want to investigate long-term health care insurance. After you are diagnosed, yo uwill not be eligible.

It is hard enough adjusting to this disease without having to also worry about how you will be able to support your family, put your children through college, and plan for retirement and/or long-term care. If you have these things nailed down early, you will be able to go through your day with much greater peace of mind. I would say to plan your affairs as if you are certain to get the disease in the next few years - then you will be ready for whatever comes.

A good fee-only financial planner is a great place to start - ours has been a godsend.

Also, know that there are many promising therapies and treatments for Alzheimer's on the very near horizon. If you do not yet have it, there may very well be a viable treatment available within your time frame. Those of us who already have the disaese are in more of a race for time.

Good luck, sir.

James
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: cbow

After reading many posts of those with EOAD, I see myself in so many of these stories. But, I don't know if my Mom had her AD before 65. She is 75 now and was diagnosed a couple of years ago. However, my whole life I remember her saying her memory was going and she joked about going crazy. Alzheimer's definitely runs in her family. All of her paternal aunts had the disease, but they all were pretty old. If the first stages last a long time, I can see where they may have been under 65 at the onset. I am only 39, but I am very forgetful. I used to be smart, but now I get confused with any kind of math. I have to depend on a calculator. I know I can't count backwards by 7's! I have a 2 year old daughter and everyone says that it's just stress making me think I'm crazy. I have also started taking anti-depressents this year because I was depressed and tired all of the time. I wondering if that is a symptom of Alzheimer's now.
My advise to anyone who thinks they may have AD, get a longterm care policy before getting a diagnosis. I am an insurance agent and I took a policy out for my Mom years ago, when she was just forgetful. I am so glad now. Even though she is still living at home, I know that it will be useful in our near future. She could never afford the type of Assisted Living that her policy will cover. Now, I just think I need to go get my own policy. I'm very worried.
Carol
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: DMax

Hi Carol- I read your post and I have a question for you. You said that your mother's paternal aunts had Alzheimer's, so you mean your grandfather's sisters? If so, did your grandfather have Alzheimer's? With familial Alzheimer's disease you have a 50/50 chance of inheriting the gene for it if one of your parents has it. If you inherit the gene, you WILL get Alzheimer's guaranteed. However, if your father didn't get Alz. then he did not get the gene for it so he could not pass it on to your mother. Your mother having Alzheimer's may be more of a sporadic type of Alzheimer's that occurs in people older than 65. I hope that I explained that clearly and that it makes you feel better! Also, if you have depression you can become very forgetful and have trouble concentrating. Having a young child in the house may have something to do with that too!
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: dcola

Hi, I have the same concerns. My Mother had early onset Alzheimers at age 59. By age 66 she could no longer speak, eat or care for herself. With early onset before the age of 65 theirs a genetic link. Being diagnosis over 65 years of age the changes go down to only 5%. I don't think you have to worry and do all the preventive things you can do to prevent or at least prolong this horrible disease. Dcola
quote:
Originally posted by St0ckTrader:
I am a 40 year old divorced male. Last year my father was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimers at the age of 70. At the time of his diagnosis he was working full time and was in excellent health. He is still in excellent health and is doing well with medications and the support of my mother, myself and my brothers. His doctors said that most likely he had been living with E.O.A. for many years, but had done a great job of keeping his memory problems hidden from everyone.

I am not scared of dealing with my fathers Alzheimers, it is the fear that I could get or already have early onset Alzheimers. I have a teenaged son and a successful career. I don't know what I would do if I was diagnosed with E.O.A. at this age? The problem for me is that I will be thinking of something that I need to do and then forget what I was thinking about. Most of the time I remember after a little while, but sometimes I can't recall at all. I am noticing this happening on a more frequent basis, like once every day or two. I don't have any other memory problems with the exception of not remembering many events in my life that occured over 20 years ago. I also have a tough time remembering the names of new people that I meet. I don't have any problems remembering important numbers (like passwords) and places. Actually my visual memory is extremely good.

I just don't think I am prepared to go through testing knowing there is a chance that I could be diagnosed with E.O.A.

What should I do?

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: DMax

There are a lot of good websites with info. on early onset and they are written so that they are easily understood. (they don't go too much into explaining the science of genes)
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: younghope1

Stocktrader, my name is Tracy, I was diagnosed at 38 years old, I consider myself the "baby" of the family of this disease so to speak. I do echo the words of all that have spoken here already. Stress can play a very big factor in a person's health especially if you are fearing something you are apt to make more mistakes and notice more things that you would normally not think about. I do encourage that if you truly feel that this is a problem that is conflicting your life then you might want to see a neurologist for an evaluation.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: jamesmn

Wow - I don't even know where to start. It took almost a year of testing. I started with my primary care physician, was referred to the University of Minnesota, and ended up at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester.

The tests included:
- Numerous bloodwork tests (so many I can't remember)
- 24-hour urine testing
- Two spinal taps (and blood patches to repair the "leaks" from one of them)
- Multiple MRI's
- Balance testing and physical therapy clinical review
- Multiple neuropsychological exams
- A PET scan (positron emission topography - VERY expensive, and not covered by insurance)
- Genetic marker screening

Those are just the ones I remember. It seemed to go on forever. The final diagnosis of Alzheimer's was given by my doctor at the Mayo Clinic - a very patient and thorough man.

I hope that helps. Let me know if there is anything else you are curious about.

Thanks,


James
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: DMax

Hi Carol-
I have not been tested, and I doubt that I will be unless there is a cure or a medication that will stop progression of the disease. I am in the process of getting long term care insurance combined with a life insurance policy, so I don't want any medical diagnoses that would affect my chances of being insured. It's hard when the people around you think you're overreacting to being forgetful, but they are just trying to make you feel better. I get that a lot around here too so I don't say much about it anymore. I figure that if it gets bad, they will tell me! I am trying to be proactive about this as much as possible, and I'm taking Omega-3 supplements, tumeric supplements, and a daily vitamin, plus, I drink apple juice and v-8 each day! I don't know whether any of it will help but it makes me feel better so that's important. I've also started having a glass of cabernet sauvignon each night, and that's not a hardship! Take care- Debbie (DMax)
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: younghope1

Jean for the most part we have all gone through the same testing some may have had alittle more advanced testing than others.
In my case being so young it took 2 years which involved a primary physician, 2 psychologists, 1 neuro-psychologist, 1 psychiatrist and a teamm at the Mayo CLinic in Rochester, Minnesota to repeat the same tests including CT's, MRI's and Neuro-psychological tests 3 times within an 18 month period in which each time there was some deline in certain areas such as perception and comprehension.
As far as advanced testing they can also do the SPECT scan which they inject a dye into your system and it shows more intricate area of the brain that are affected that CT's and MRI's cannot pick up. Spinal Taps are also done to see it there is a specific protein that is there and that is a very strong indicator of Alzheimers Disease.

Tracy
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jean H.

quote:
Originally posted by jamesmn:
Stock Trader,

I was diagnosed with Early AD this paast year - I am 46, and like you had a very successful career. I also have two daughters in college.

One of the things you can do to prepare - not only for this, but for all contingencies, is to make sure you have some key financial planning things squared away. Fortunately for me, I have very good diasbility insurance, and made sure I paid the premiums myself, on an after-tax basis. In doing so, the disability income I receive is tax-free, and as such provides almost 95% of my pre-diagnosis salary (I no longer get bonuses or stock options, however...)

In addition, you may want to prepare your Advance Healthcare Directives, and Durable Powers of Attorney. And finally, if you honestly believe this is a possibility for your future, yo umay want to investigate long-term health care insurance. After you are diagnosed, yo uwill not be eligible.

It is hard enough adjusting to this disease without having to also worry about how you will be able to support your family, put your children through college, and plan for retirement and/or long-term care. If you have these things nailed down early, you will be able to go through your day with much greater peace of mind. I would say to plan your affairs as if you are certain to get the disease in the next few years - then you will be ready for whatever comes.

A good fee-only financial planner is a great place to start - ours has been a godsend.

Also, know that there are many promising therapies and treatments for Alzheimer's on the very near horizon. If you do not yet have it, there may very well be a viable treatment available within your time frame. Those of us who already have the disaese are in more of a race for time.

Good luck, sir.

James

Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: cbow

quote:
Originally posted by DMax:
Hi Carol- I read your post and I have a question for you. You said that your mother's paternal aunts had Alzheimer's, so you mean your grandfather's sisters? If so, did your grandfather have Alzheimer's? With familial Alzheimer's disease you have a 50/50 chance of inheriting the gene for it if one of your parents has it. If you inherit the gene, you WILL get Alzheimer's guaranteed. However, if your father didn't get Alz. then he did not get the gene for it so he could not pass it on to your mother. Your mother having Alzheimer's may be more of a sporadic type of Alzheimer's that occurs in people older than 65. I hope that I explained that clearly and that it makes you feel better! Also, if you have depression you can become very forgetful and have trouble concentrating. Having a young child in the house may have something to do with that too!


Yes, My grandfather's sisters are the one's who all had AD. My grandfather died in his 40's from high blood pressure. So...we'll never know if he would have developed AD later in life. Have you had the test to see if you have the gene? I have thought about it, but everyone thinks I'm just stressed!!!
Carol
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jean H.

I am curious to know what kind of testing was done to diagnose Alzheimers.

Jean H.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jean H.

quote:
Originally posted by Jean H.:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by jamesmn:
Wow - I don't even know where to start. It took almost a year of testing. I started with my primary care physician, was referred to the University of Minnesota, and ended up at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester.

The tests included:
Posted October 20, 2006 07:48 PM Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by jamesmn:
Wow - I don't even know where to start. It took almost a year of testing. I started with my primary care physician, was referred to the University of Minnesota, and ended up at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester.

The tests included:
- Numerous bloodwork tests (so many I can't remember)
- 24-hour urine testing
- Two spinal taps (and blood patches to repair the "leaks" from one of them)
- Multiple MRI's
- Balance testing and physical therapy clinical review
- Multiple neuropsychological exams
- A PET scan (positron emission topography - VERY expensive, and not covered by insurance)
- Genetic marker screening

Those are just the ones I remember. It seemed to go on forever. The final diagnosis of Alzheimer's was given by my doctor at the Mayo Clinic - a very patient and thorough man.

I hope that helps. Let me know if there is anything else you are curious about.

Thanks,


James



- Numerous bloodwork tests (so many I can't remember)
- 24-hour urine testing
- Two spinal taps (and blood patches to repair the "leaks" from one of them)
- Multiple MRI's
- Balance testing and physical therapy clinical review
- Multiple neuropsychological exams
- A PET scan (positron emission topography - VERY expensive, and not covered by insurance)
- Genetic marker screening

Those are just the ones I remember. It seemed to go on forever. The final diagnosis of Alzheimer's was given by my doctor at the Mayo Clinic - a very patient and thorough man.

I hope that helps. Let me know if there is anything else you are curious about.

Thanks,


James


James: I am new to this site and am still trying to learn my way around so my message may not come through. I first of all want to send my thoughts and prayers for your condition and say that it is a wonderful help that you are willing to share your information. Thank you so much. I'm sure that I will have lots more questions to ask you. I have been spending some time reading a lot of the posted messages and some of my questions have been addressed.
Just a bit about my situation.. my husband who is 81 started showing some definite memory issues three years ago. The Dr. did some blood work and to rule out thyroid and a couple other factors. He then referred us to what we thought was going to be a memory clinic for evaluation. When the paperwork arrived, addressed to me each page had Alzheimers at the top and it was to get his medical and family history before they did an evaluation. My husband was balking about going anywhere for testing of any kind so the Dr. started him on aricept. He has been on this for three years... his memory loss has increased but he is mostly still fully functional. He is in a definite pattern of denial and refuses to discuss seeking testing, saying it is just normal aging and that I am his memory. I guess my question for now is:
what do you think of pushing for further testing and if it were your dad, would you put him through a lot of testing at his age? I have asked his primary care Dr. if he feels he should tell him his memory loss is more than just normal aging and he wants to refer him to a neurologist and hope the neurologist will tell him as he doesn't want to be the bad guy. Any suggestions will be appreciated and I already feel support just finding this site. Thanks and God Bless You. Jean H.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jean H.

quote:
Originally posted by jamesmn:
Wow - I don't even know where to start. It took almost a year of testing. I started with my primary care physician, was referred to the University of Minnesota, and ended up at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester.

The tests included:
- Numerous bloodwork tests (so many I can't remember)
- 24-hour urine testing
- Two spinal taps (and blood patches to repair the "leaks" from one of them)
- Multiple MRI's
- Balance testing and physical therapy clinical review
- Multiple neuropsychological exams
- A PET scan (positron emission topography - VERY expensive, and not covered by insurance)
- Genetic marker screening

Those are just the ones I remember. It seemed to go on forever. The final diagnosis of Alzheimer's was given by my doctor at the Mayo Clinic - a very patient and thorough man.

I hope that helps. Let me know if there is anything else you are curious about.

Thanks,


James


James: I am new to this site and am still trying to learn my way around so my message may not come through. I first of all want to send my thoughts and prayers for your condition and say that it is a wonderful help that you are willing to share your information. Thank you so much. I'm sure that I will have lots more questions to ask you. I have been spending some time reading a lot of the posted messages and some of my questions have been addressed.
Just a bit about my situation.. my husband who is 81 started showing some definite memory issues three years ago. The Dr. did some blood work and to rule out thyroid and a couple other factors. He then referred us to what we thought was going to be a memory clinic for evaluation. When the paperwork arrived, addressed to me each page had Alzheimers at the top and it was to get his medical and family history before they did an evaluation. My husband was balking about going anywhere for testing of any kind so the Dr. started him on aricept. He has been on this for three years... his memory loss has increased but he is mostly still fully functional. He is in a definite pattern of denial and refuses to discuss seeking testing, saying it is just normal aging and that I am his memory. I guess my question for now is:
what do you think of pushing for further testing and if it were your dad, would you put him through a lot of testing at his age? I have asked his primary care Dr. if he feels he should tell him his memory loss is more than just normal aging and he wants to refer him to a neurologist and hope the neurologist will tell him as he doesn't want to be the bad guy. Any suggestions will be appreciated and I already feel support just finding this site. Thanks and God Bless You. Jean H.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: jamesmn

quote:
Originally posted by Jean H.:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jean H.:

James: I am new to this site and am still trying to learn my way around so my message may not come through. I first of all want to send my thoughts and prayers for your condition and say that it is a wonderful help that you are willing to share your information. Thank you so much. I'm sure that I will have lots more questions to ask you. I have been spending some time reading a lot of the posted messages and some of my questions have been addressed.
Just a bit about my situation.. my husband who is 81 started showing some definite memory issues three years ago. The Dr. did some blood work and to rule out thyroid and a couple other factors. He then referred us to what we thought was going to be a memory clinic for evaluation. When the paperwork arrived, addressed to me each page had Alzheimers at the top and it was to get his medical and family history before they did an evaluation. My husband was balking about going anywhere for testing of any kind so the Dr. started him on aricept. He has been on this for three years... his memory loss has increased but he is mostly still fully functional. He is in a definite pattern of denial and refuses to discuss seeking testing, saying it is just normal aging and that I am his memory. I guess my question for now is:
what do you think of pushing for further testing and if it were your dad, would you put him through a lot of testing at his age? I have asked his primary care Dr. if he feels he should tell him his memory loss is more than just normal aging and he wants to refer him to a neurologist and hope the neurologist will tell him as he doesn't want to be the bad guy. Any suggestions will be appreciated and I already feel support just finding this site. Thanks and God Bless You. Jean H.


Jean,

THere isn't an easy answer to your question - I gues it would depend on the totality of the circumstances. Is your dad in excellent health otherwise? If he is already on Aricept, then it is likely that your doctor or neurologist has already made an assumption that he has some form of dementia where Aricept may be appropriate.

I don't know what the value of continuing to push for a lot of additional testing would be at his age. The question is: If you found out he has Alzheimer's, what would you do differently? I guess I would just make an assumption that Alzheimer's is a possibility, and prepare and act accordingly.

The challenges presented by Alzheimer's change with age. You might want to consider contacting your local Alzheimer's Association and discuss with them how best to prepare - under the assumption that he likely has the disease.

Again, I'm not sure that the conflict introduced by continuing to press for testing against his will would be worth the information gained. The reality is that at his age, he will likely eventually succumb to something other than Alzheimer's.

Good luck with your decision, and know that we are always here for you.

James
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jean H.

[QUOTE]Originally posted by younghope1:
Jean for the most part we have all gone through the same testing some may have had alittle more advanced testing than others.
In my case being so young it took 2 years which involved a primary physician, 2 psychologists, 1 neuro-psychologist, 1 psychiatrist and a teamm at the Mayo CLinic in Rochester, Minnesota to repeat the same tests including CT's, MRI's and Neuro-psychological tests 3 times within an 18 month period in which each time there was some deline in certain areas such as perception and comprehension.
As far as advanced testing they can also do the SPECT scan which they inject a dye into your system and it shows more intricate area of the brain that are affected that CT's and MRI's cannot pick up. Spinal Taps are also done to see it there is a specific protein that is there and that is a very strong indicator of Alzheimers Disease.
I am new to this site and am still trying to learn my way around so my message may not come through. I first of all want to send my thoughts and prayers for your condition and say that it is a wonderful help that you are willing to share your information. Thank you so much. I'm sure that I will have lots more questions to ask you. I have been spending some time reading a lot of the posted messages and some of my questions have been addressed.
Just a bit about my situation.. my husband who is 81 started showing some definite memory issues three years ago. The Dr. did some blood work and to rule out thyroid and a couple other factors. He then referred us to what we thought was going to be a memory clinic for evaluation. When the paperwork arrived, addressed to me each page had Alzheimers at the top and it was to get his medical and family history before they did an evaluation. My husband was balking about going anywhere for testing of any kind so the Dr. started him on aricept. He has been on this for three years... his memory loss has increased but he is mostly still fully functional. He is in a definite pattern of denial and refuses to discuss seeking testing, saying it is just normal aging and that I am his memory. I guess my question for now is:
what do you think of pushing for further testing and if it were your dad, would you put him through a lot of testing at his age? I have asked his primary care Dr. if he feels he should tell him his memory loss is more than just normal aging and he wants to refer him to a neurologist and hope the neurologist will tell him as he doesn't want to be the bad guy. Any suggestions will be appreciated and I already feel support just finding this site. Thanks and God Bless You. Jean H.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:39 PM
Originally posted by: Jean H.

Tracy
Thank you for your input to my question about
diagnosis. I am feeling a support from the group
on this message board already and will have lots
more questions. Hope your day was a good one.
Jean H.
 
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