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Behaviors in Dementia/special care unit
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: jedforcwd

I will be placing my husband in a Special Care unit before long as his AD has progressed to a level that I cannot manage alone. I have heard comments here and there that some behaviors may not be tolerated in the facility, severe aggression, continuous exit seeking, etc. This is worrying me as I have no idea how he will do once placed. Who has experience with this, and would you mind sharing?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: meeko11

Even though he was evaluated by the facility before I placed my husband they later decided that they could not keep him because of continued exit seeking and several escapes. He was sent to a psych unit for med adjustment and could not return to the facility. They kept my upfront costs and I had to fight to get my first and last deposits back. Mind you this was a secure dementia only facility.
Next placement didn't start out too well either. Husband escaped from a double locked unit while wearing a wanderguard anklet. I had to hire a one on one aide to be with him. As I watched all our saving dwindle I panicked. It had taken three months to even find this facility. I did my research and presented a med plan to his doctor. Doctor wasn't too pleased with me but did finally go along with ordering very large dose of seroquel.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: Starling

One more thing. My husband started out in a hospital. Both the cognitive therapist and the social worker at the nursing home seriously thought about moving my husband to an ALF the same company runs that was even closer to my home, and immediately changed their minds. Both because of the exit seeking and the aggression. They knew the ALF wouldn't be able to keep someone like him safe.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

The Alzheimers.org database on facilities tells which behaviors the facility says it can cope with. But I'd double check -- and if possible, get it in writing. And of course -- visit to see HOW the staff copes with these problems. Some facilities handle problems by adjusting the environment and the way staff interact with the person -- and others rely more on medications. Be sure the facility's approach jives with your own beliefs and values.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: Starling

I experienced all of it. It started before he left. I got lucky. They had no problems dealing with any of it.

For the exit seeking make sure they have set up a way to not allow the patients to leave the floor or area they are in. They also put my husband's picture at the front desk so she could sound an alarm if she saw him. Because they were set up right, they just redirected him. I never saw them with him, but there is this old Chinese lady (who I think doesn't speak English) and I've seen them gently get her out of an elevator (which wasn't going anywhere as long as she was anywhere near it) so I know what they do.

As for aggression, they had some of that to deal with too. When I asked why some things had not been done they explained and my response was they needed to keep the aides safe. They simply backed off if he objected to what they were doing. Sometimes they asked again. Sometimes not.

They take good care of him, but when he wouldn't let them help with food, he lost weight and when he wouldn't cooperate with a shower he didn't get one. I wouldn't have been able to do anything more myself if he had still been home. As the aggression and exit seeking stopped, things like showers went right back on schedule. When he started letting them feed him the weight loss stopped.

It is what it is.
 
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