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Theraputic Replies, I can't think straight, mind is muddled
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: DLMifm

The slippery slide continues. My LO will sit on the sofa and look unhappy. If I ask how are you doing {or similar hello} she will ask what's happening to me.... I can't focus on anything, my thinking is all jumbled.... what are they talking about on the TV (CNN)... I can't stop thinking I just want to sleep.... you don't understand ... etc.

She's seeing a shrink that has an excellent reputation for her AD knowledge etc. appropriate meds are in place.

She is a retired Psych RN, knows she has AD, lost her mother and sister not to long ago from AD. I sit beside her on the sofa, but I am at loss for words. I listen and listen ....

My problem is how wordsmyth my replies.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: vjh

some LO do well with the truth, others might respond better to something like "I quesss you are overtired, maybe you would like some warm milk" or a distraction like lets go for a walk, or help me put the dishes away.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: jfkoc

CNN might be difficult...can you switch to something that involves less concentration?
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

What seems to help my partner most is a simple reassuring comment like "You're really fine; you might be tired. Let's do something relaxing" -- plus an interesting activity that she likes.

It took a lot of time at first to assemble a full day's worth of activities that my partner likes and can do with little if any frustration, but now I'd say we have at least twice as much as could fit into one day -- plus a list of short excursions for pleasure and interest.

To me, this is a key. At first, she couldn't or wouldn't do any activity all by herself -- so someone had to be doing something WITH her every minute she was awake. Now there are some things she does by herself contentedly for anywhere from five minutes to over an hour -- and she often has an idea of what she'd like to do next.

Having something interesting to do seems like a huge antidote to complaints, worry and unhappiness.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:41 PM
Originally posted by: DLMifm

[quote]What seems to help my partner most is a simple reassuring comment like "You're really fine; you might be tired. Let's do something relaxing" -- plus an interesting activity that she likes.

It took a lot of time at first to assemble a full day's worth of activities that my partner likes and can do with little if any frustration, but now I'd say we have at least twice as much as could fit into one day -- plus a list of short excursions for pleasure and interest.[/quote]

We had to drop out of daycare in-favor of hiring PCA person from HomeInstead to come to our house periodically during the month. Once i get my carer dandyfunk blogs put together one will have over one hundred in-home activities. they're new and haven't been found by Google yet.The pca's are willing to do activities. I am about to order some simple desktop games. We had an aquarium for years, I still have the stand, now to find a used set up.

During the daylight hours there is less sun-downing behavior. We're up three of four times between midnight and 6AM for personal care. It is during these short breaks form sleep that the mind muddled comments arise an when she first awakes.

BTW if I am awake late at night I switch from CNN to the classical music channels and then she sometimes stays awake because want to see the composer and orchestra she loves music and watching PBS specials.
 
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