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she doesn't like sitting around
Internal Administrator
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: ramblings

My mom loved to cook, and she hates to sit and watch me work around the house and cook for her. I started putting her back in the kitchen (I stay and wipe cabnets, do dishes etc., so she doesn't know I am keeping an eye on her.) I started with having her make coleslaw. Then the next day I had her make fruit salad. Then chicken salad. she likes to wash the dishes and wipe down the counter (usually these may need a little redoing...when she is in another room. Smiler) Today, it's going to be cookies. I want to see if she will follow the recipe. Then I will 'just happen' to be there when they go in/come out of the oven. She loves to set the table. Mostly, she wants to feel needed and now she is starting to.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: Deirdre44

quote:
Originally posted by ramblings:
My mom loved to cook, and she hates to sit and watch me work around the house and cook for her. I started putting her back in the kitchen (I stay and wipe cabnets, do dishes etc., so she doesn't know I am keeping an eye on her.) I started with having her make coleslaw. Then the next day I had her make fruit salad. Then chicken salad. she likes to wash the dishes and wipe down the counter (usually these may need a little redoing...when she is in another room. Smiler) Today, it's going to be cookies. I want to see if she will follow the recipe. Then I will 'just happen' to be there when they go in/come out of the oven. She loves to set the table. Mostly, she wants to feel needed and now she is starting to.


Very nice Smiler And, good food, too! Smiler
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: Mind-Start

Here are some pointers. You can start with what your mother has liked to do in the past - was she someome who cleaned house, knit, baked, gardened, etc. Once you pick an activity, then you start to think how you might do the activity and how you might break it down, offering your mom some of the more basic and repetetive steps of the activity. For example, if you try baking, you could make sugar cookies where your mom helps stir ingredients and roll dough balls. For housework, polishing silverware, wiping dishes, wiping tables, folding clothes or rolling up socks are examples. It will take someone to get your mom started on the task and encouragement throughout to tell her again what to do and to keep going. Also, to get her started, it may not work if you ask her, "Will you wipe the dishes?" but more often it works if you simply tell, "I need your help. Come with me." Offer praise throughout the task and thank her for helping. Routine is very important, so if you can have her help with 1 or 2 steps of each meal every day and steps of the housework, then add in some additional things such as physical exercise (take a walk, kick a ball back and forth), music, etc. It really does take effort on the part of the caregiver. But it will be time worth the investment. I hope these give you some ideas and guidance. I would like to hear how these tips work out for you! Originally posted by lrob:
Mind Start: My mother, who seems to be in the moderate stage of alz, is moving in with us next week. I would LOVE to hear more ideas on how to keep her engaged from you.

Thank you for offering![/QUOTE]
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: Mimi S.

Hi Jodi,
Welcome to our world. We're so glad you found us and told us what works for your dad.

Please tell us more about yourself.

You can go to 'start a new discussion, click that and write a topic in the small box. Then in the large box, write whatever you want to.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: lrob

Mind Start: My mother, who seems to be in the moderate stage of alz, is moving in with us next week. I would LOVE to hear more ideas on how to keep her engaged from you.

Thank you for offering!
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: dmill

My brother (55) lives with us and one of the things we both enjoy is getting dinner ready. He likes to peel the carrots, put ice in the glasses for water, etc. It is a time we can be doing something together and both feel helpful.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: baygirl

my dad never had hobbies, so it has been challenging finding things for him to do. i put him to work in the kitchen slicing and dicing (he is very safe with the knife)and it makes him so happy because he remembers stories of living with his Gram and helping her cook. also i put the coupon section out for him and ask him to cut coupons for me.i simply throw away the ones i am not interested in..after he goes backto his den of course! he likes to wash dishes too.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: Mind-Start

Sounds like you are doing a great job, Jodi. It goes to show that often a persons will enjoy doing something that they maybe never did that often in their adult life. Not only enjoy, but help them to feel useful and productive.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:52 PM
Originally posted by: Mind-Start

What a wonderful example of how a caregiver can provide the environment and supervision needed, allowing a safe and successful outcome versus complete dependence - i.e. watching someone else do everything. Keeping persons with memory loss engaged even as they have more cognitive difficulties is key in promoting good quality of life, sense of accomplishment, and has found to decrease negative behaviors and burden on caregivers. Thanks for sharing this story! If anyone would like more ideas on how to keep persons engaged, I would be happy to share my experiences from my work as an occupational therapist
 
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