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Discontinuing Aricept and Namenda
Internal Administrator
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: Caroleee

My 95 year old Mom is, I think, in stage 6 Alzheimers, late mid-stage. She is in a care facility. She is on Namenda and Aricept. Also klonopin for anxiety and severe myonic jerking. And neurontin, meclazine and zoloft. My question is: Is there any indication that Namenda and Aricept are prolonging her life? I do not want to prolong her life. Although she can still play the piano, most of her time is spent crying or jerking or obsessing or being delusional. I know she would not want to be living this way. If I thought that taking her off these drugs might help the natural course of events happen more quickly, I would, at this point, do it in a heart beat. But if they are helping her have some quality of life, then I would keep her on. She is still continent and has a great appetite. She has been a great Mom and had a wonderful life. Now is the time, I believe, to let her go. Gosh this is a heartbreaking disease. :-(
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: meeko11

quote:
learned that a very low dose of ambien (2.5mg) three times a day would keep her rage under control (by trial and error, of course), so that's all the meds she's taking now.

Isn't ambien a sleep med?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: jellybeans

quote:
Originally posted by K.L.C.:
I am wondering if it really matters if you have a definite diagnosis of what type of dementia. We have been told my dad has Alzheimer's or Alzheimer's type dementia. But when I describe his symptoms to friends with medical training and also from what I read, I wonder if it is a different type of dementia. And if it is, should he not be taking Aricept and/or Namenda. My Dad has been on aricept since Nov 2008 and then started Namenda in Jan 2009 at 5 mg. and recently increased to 10mg. He is not getting better and is steadily declining. The change in just over a year (from June 200 is drastic- from a suspicion of dementia to needing 24 hour care. The doctor said moderate stage in Nov 08 to Moderate to Severe Stage Sept 09. Does AD really change that quickly? Is the medication making it worse? How do we know what to do, who to trust?

I remember reading an article a while back that stated that even patients with vascular dementia tended to do better with behavioral problems when they were taking aricept or namenda- I'm not sure if it was one or both drugs. It's probably best to check with his psychiatrist or neurologist.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: LovingNana

quote:
Originally posted by Caroleee:
Thanx Steven for your thoughtful comments. Makes me curious to see what will happen when in 1 1/2 weeks we take Mom off Namenda. She has now been off Aricept for five days. No change. (Incidentally, I checked with the dr. and the pharmacist and the website, and found no information recommending weaning.)
How did you get a diagnosis for your Mom, Steven? Mom's doctor indicated that it would probably not be until autopsy to determine if this is really Alzheimers. To date, he calls it Alzheimer's type dementia.



I am a 57 yr old EOAD patient. Please forgive me for butting in on caregivers site but I do read comments from caregivers from time to time to help me try understand how my husband & family feel. I am not to the point that I can't communicate (or at least I don't feel I am). I have in my opinion one of the best AD neurologist anywhere (Harvard & Univ. of So Calif) His passion is dealing with AD patients. He has put his entire life into it. I know I am in good hands & trust him fully with my care. I keep a journal from day to day for yesterday is gone for me. Looking back over my AD history (which is written down) it looks like I was in pretty bad shape when my dr. starting treating me. I have been on Razadyne & Namenda both for probably 2 yrs. I could not tolerate Aricept. Since I have been on these 2 drugs they have been lifesavers for me. I have improved greatly. I also have neuropathy & was taking high dosages of Neurotin. After being on this drug for several months I starting having Parkinson syndrome & retaining fluid until clear blisters popped up all over my feet & legs. My dr. said it was a reaction to the Neurotin so was taken off of it and symptons went away after Neurotin cleared my body completely. Yes, I still have the neuropathy to the point that I can barely walk now but I don't have the shaking to the point I could not feed myself & I lost all the fluid. Maybe the AD drugs are a security blanket for me & I just think they are working but whatever something is working & I would hate to know my husband or dr would take them away. With EOAD we are in a No Win situation on this side of the soil but everyday I get up & remember who I am & who my family is I "County My Blessings". I do have my moments which my daughters call "One of Mom's Episodes" but hey, who doesn't have an episode or two every now & then. I feel for you caregivers for I took care of my grandmother whom I loved with all my heart who had AD and I cherished every moment of every day I could spend with her. I took the good with the bad & after she died I put the bad out of my mind & just focused on the good days. Just focus on what little good time you have & cherish it for you will have that forever. Even though there are days I can't get words out I do understand what my husband says to me or my family & I do feel their anxiety & I can tell you I don't know about other AD patients but for me I pick up on it & it turns me topsy turvey. Sorry for rattling on but while I have these thoughts running through my head thought I would share for these thoughts will be gone & lost to me forever tomorrow. Sandy
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: left210

quote:
Originally posted by Caroleee:
I have put my Mom back on Aricept too. It was not supposed to be helpful in the later stages of Alzheimers, but she went into a HUGE decline within a week of going off Aricept. I hope that she will be able to regain what she lost.


We experiended the same thing with my grandmother. The nursing home and their pharmcological team determined the Razadyne was not for late stage dementia and took my grandmother off of it without notification to us (which is a whole other issue) and we started noticing an extreme decline in her condition. She has been put back on it and is doing better but will not regain what she lost in that month. Also, she had been on Namenda in the past and she had too many side effects from it but does well on the Razadyne.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: noahluvr

quote:
Originally posted by LovingNana:
quote:
Originally posted by Caroleee:
Thanx Steven for your thoughtful comments. Makes me curious to see what will happen when in 1 1/2 weeks we take Mom off Namenda. She has now been off Aricept for five days. No change. (Incidentally, I checked with the dr. and the pharmacist and the website, and found no information recommending weaning.)
How did you get a diagnosis for your Mom, Steven? Mom's doctor indicated that it would probably not be until autopsy to determine if this is really Alzheimers. To date, he calls it Alzheimer's type dementia.



I am a 57 yr old EOAD patient. Please forgive me for butting in on caregivers site but I do read comments from caregivers from time to time to help me try understand how my husband & family feel. I am not to the point that I can't communicate (or at least I don't feel I am). I have in my opinion one of the best AD neurologist anywhere (Harvard & Univ. of So Calif) His passion is dealing with AD patients. He has put his entire life into it. I know I am in good hands & trust him fully with my care. I keep a journal from day to day for yesterday is gone for me. Looking back over my AD history (which is written down) it looks like I was in pretty bad shape when my dr. starting treating me. I have been on Razadyne & Namenda both for probably 2 yrs. I could not tolerate Aricept. Since I have been on these 2 drugs they have been lifesavers for me. I have improved greatly. I also have neuropathy & was taking high dosages of Neurotin. After being on this drug for several months I starting having Parkinson syndrome & retaining fluid until clear blisters popped up all over my feet & legs. My dr. said it was a reaction to the Neurotin so was taken off of it and symptons went away after Neurotin cleared my body completely. Yes, I still have the neuropathy to the point that I can barely walk now but I don't have the shaking to the point I could not feed myself & I lost all the fluid. Maybe the AD drugs are a security blanket for me & I just think they are working but whatever something is working & I would hate to know my husband or dr would take them away. With EOAD we are in a No Win situation on this side of the soil but everyday I get up & remember who I am & who my family is I "County My Blessings". I do have my moments which my daughters call "One of Mom's Episodes" but hey, who doesn't have an episode or two every now & then. I feel for you caregivers for I took care of my grandmother whom I loved with all my heart who had AD and I cherished every moment of every day I could spend with her. I took the good with the bad & after she died I put the bad out of my mind & just focused on the good days. Just focus on what little good time you have & cherish it for you will have that forever. Even though there are days I can't get words out I do understand what my husband says to me or my family & I do feel their anxiety & I can tell you I don't know about other AD patients but for me I pick up on it & it turns me topsy turvey. Sorry for rattling on but while I have these thoughts running through my head thought I would share for these thoughts will be gone & lost to me forever tomorrow. Sandy


Sandy, Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings while they are still clear. It is deeply appreciated as it seems to me at the heart of this discussion and all care for an Alzheimer, dementia, Picks disease et al patient. Itis the weight of responsibility the caregiver feels in making decisions they never foresaw would need to be made and which they are not sure is in the best interest of the person they love and are caring for. I have come to the same conclusion as you...focus on the good days and the wonderful moments. My sister-in-law also still understands although she cannot communicate at all and we still have great,funny moments. I have seen families in turmoil because the money to care for their loved ones runs out and then, everything has to go. Still the goal is care with dignity and as little pain/discomfort as possible, recognizing that only a rare few leave this world without experiencing both to some degree. Thank you most of all for your sharing how you pick up on your family's anxiety. Very helpful on a day to day basis.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Katmeow

After initially seeming a little better after starting on 5 mg Namenda in addition to Aricept, my father took a huge turn for the worse when we upped it to 10 mg as per rx. Now a few weeks later, he is becoming increasingly confused, agitated, and delusional. We are going to try cutting his dosage to .25 mg to see how he responds. Will let you know. I'd appreciate any feedback on this strategy too. Thanks, Kat
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Alori

Carolee- re: neurtonin for cramps--Cramps are a side affect of Aricept--so that may solve that problem.
It is my understanding that Aricept usually stops "helping' after about 2 years, but they don't really know. Some Dr's figure it can't hurt. I read somewhere in caregivers forum about myonic jerking as a symptom of Alz-especially the late stages. Repost under the Caregiver forum, or use the find feature. Hope that helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Caroleee

Hmm. This forum isn't very active write now is it. No responses. Maybe it is because as I read through, all of us, or many of us are having the same concerns and questions. And there are no answers. Lots of anecdotal reports, but they vary 180 degrees. This is one of the things that is so frustrating about this disease. It is so difficult to know what helps and what doesn't help. The "patient" can't report, and I can't climb inside to tell. All I know is that a year later, she is on so many drugs it makes me cringe. We have never been a medicine will "fix it" family. In fact, we have often avoided traditional medicine. And here she is loaded up with a cup full of pills several times a day.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: skericheri

Ferrell---Anesthesia with dementia is a topic that is discussed frequently. NDuke (a fellow poster) has done considerable research and shared it on the Caregiver forum. You might want to do an advanced search using the term "anesthesia" and include her name as the poster to learn about her findings. If you cannot find the links please post here and I will provide it when I have the time.

I'm sorry...Namenda and Pick/FTD are things that I have no experience with.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: LauraLea123

Hi Carolee,

My mom is in stage 7 now, but when she was at a moderate stage, her doctor wanted to put her on Aricept. I said wait hold on, I need to research this. And from what I found out about the numerous side effects, I was not sure that this drug would even help her, and might even hurt her.

At the time my mom was living in assisted living, and tho they were wonderful there, I didn't think they would be able to notice if she was having side-effect that would hinder her from enjoying her life.

I spoke with my family and we decided that no we did not want her on the drug. The evidence was just not there.

My mom has lived for almost 10 years with this illness, and just within the last year she has become unable to speak except a few pharses. I don't know for sure, but I believe by not putting her on this drug she didn't have to deal with the side-effects and therefore was able to live a very wonderful life.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Alori

Carolee-try reposting under the caregiver forum-that is where the action is Smiler You should get a good response there.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

Hi, KLC. First off, it is incredibly difficult to diagnose a disorder that causes dementia. It's not a matter of trust so much as understanding that there are rarely any straightforward answers. If the doctors specialize in diagnosing/treating dementias, you probably have the best answer you're going to get. If they don't, they may easily be wrong about the diagnosis.

The type of dementia your loved one has may or may not affect whether Aricept and/or Namenda should be prescribed.

No two AD patients are the same. That said, it is a little unusual for AD to progress that quickly. I'd suspect vascular dementia (VaD) or "mixed dementia" (which is a combination of AD and VaD.) Both of these are relatively common, both are very difficult to differentiate from AD alone. VaD tends to progress in a step-wise fashion, with very sharp declines followed by plateaus. One would think that VaD would show up on an MRI or CT scan, but if brain imaging was done very early in the disease progression, maybe not. Anyway, Aricept and Namenda would be prescribed for any of these. Meds to control any underlying cardiovascular problems (blood pressure meds, anticoagulants, etc) would be prescribed for VaD and mixed AD patients.

I notice on your other thread the possibility of Lewy body dementia was raised, because hallucinations were the presenting symptom. Aricept and Namenda would be prescribed for LBD, and I've seen studies that concluded aricept is more likely to be beneficial to AD or LBD patients with hallucinations than to AD patients without.

Lewy body patients tend to be extremely sensitive to neuroleptics (antipsychotics), and can have very bad reactions to them. So you may want to keep that in mind.

How old is your dad? If he is younger, and has behavioral issues (disinhibition, rages, agitation, etc) that developed before the memory loss, then it is possible that he has one of the frontotemporal dementias (FTDs). This is an extremely complex family of disorders, with highly variable underlying pathologies. Perhaps his medical history and/or the brain imaging results indicate that an FTD is unlikely, however. FTDs may progress more quickly than AD, although usually not quite that rapidly. Aricept would typically not be prescribed, although a few purported FTD patients do respond well. (One wonders if they were correctly diagnosed.) Namenda may or may not be helpful; there is enough anecdotal evidence that studies are under way to determine whether Namenda would be broadly useful for FTDs.

Many of us are leery of using psychiatrists unless absolutely necessary, due to a perception that they tend to over-medicate.


In any event, it does not sound as if the aricept and namenda are helping. It is entirely possible that one or both are causing adverse side effects. I would suggest having a serious discussion with your father's doctor about discontinuing them.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: terrys

I belive that the Aricept in the later stages does not do any good. I took my mother off Aricept and the nursing home where she is at looked at me like I was just awful. Now I am dealing with Physical Therapy that they are giving her. My mother would not want this and it is the quailty of life which my mother does not have any more. My mother is in the 7 stage of Alz. Good luck..Terry
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: nette

I am happy to report that just 24 hours after putting my dad back on Namenda and Aricept, he is 90% back to how he was prior to taking him off these. We feel very fortunate he responded so quickly. I called his caregiver today and she said he is "back to normal" and that everyone slept last night. Like the saying goes, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Luann

I am interested in the effects of discontiuing Aricept & Namenda. Our family doesn't see that it really helps my Mom, and our Dad passed away in March and the expense of these medications are ridiculous. There are no generics for these drugs that we are aware of.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: K.L.C.

I am wondering if it really matters if you have a definite diagnosis of what type of dementia. We have been told my dad has Alzheimer's or Alzheimer's type dementia. But when I describe his symptoms to friends with medical training and also from what I read, I wonder if it is a different type of dementia. And if it is, should he not be taking Aricept and/or Namenda. My Dad has been on aricept since Nov 2008 and then started Namenda in Jan 2009 at 5 mg. and recently increased to 10mg. He is not getting better and is steadily declining. The change in just over a year (from June 200 is drastic- from a suspicion of dementia to needing 24 hour care. The doctor said moderate stage in Nov 08 to Moderate to Severe Stage Sept 09. Does AD really change that quickly? Is the medication making it worse? How do we know what to do, who to trust?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: DebZ

Jessica - My bro (EOAD, age 56) tried the namenda and he seemed to be worse on it, so we discontinued it. It does work well for others, tho. Did you know that one of the possible side effects of namenda is confusion!?!

I agree with you about not prolonging this horrific disease.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Steven B

I joined this forum awhile back but haven't been very active. Been too busy caring for my mother with FTD (frontotemporal dementia) formally known as Pick's disease.

When I came across this string on Namenda I felt I had to do a post.

Even though the Cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Razadyne,Cognex and Exelon)are FDA approved for Alzheimer's disease there has been no proof or indication they help with other forms of dementia. The newest kid on the block is our friend Namenda which is not a Cholinesterase inhibitor. The latest treatment plans for dementia have been to combine a medication like Aricept with Namenda.

My mother was put on Razadyne even though there is no proof that it will help her FTD. She has been on it since 9/26/06. Then just over a month ago her neurologist add the Namenda. She started out with just 5 mg in the morning for the first week then onto 5mg AM and 5mg PM the second until at the 3rd week she was on the regular dose of 10mg AM and PM. At about this time her behavior began to change. From one day to the next she could no longer tie her shoes. She began obsessing about her hair touching her forehead and began staring into the mirror for 20 to 30 mins at a time. Then she began to hold her left hand to her nose and cover it. The only time she stopped this or didn't do it was when she ate. She also got much more confused about things as well. She also began having headaches all the time, which she has rarely ever had in her life.

I became very concerned and called her doctor and informed him of what was going on. He is not one who likes to medicate to begin with which I feel is a blessing these days. He indicated to me, which for a doctor again these days is very unusual, that first of all the meds my mother is on have shown no proof of helping her form of dementia. His view point also was that even for people with Alzheimer's they offer little to no help. So he told me to at least stop the Namenda and see what happened. Within 4 days of stopping the Namenda, her headaches went away, she stopped grasping and holding her nose, she began tying her shoes again and has become more interactive with me.

Incidentally just recently the British Medical Journal "Lancet" published an article of an ongoing independent study and research on Aricept. Their findings stated mostly what my mother's doctor had told me. They concluded that in most cases Aricept has not preformed as advertised. Naturally Pfizer had a bird over this news and even the Alzheimer's association made a comment (this would be natural since 5% of their donations come from Pfizer).

It would appear to me from reading the posts on here that your loved ones may have been doing OK on just Aricept alone but the troubles began once it was combined with Namenda. I am not a doctor but have surely done a great deal of research into this stuff.

As a side note you might be interested in checking out this web page: http://extoxnet.orst.edu/tibs/cholines.htm
It talks about how many pesticides contain, "CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION" and the effect on the human body. And we give this to people for dementia treatment? Makes you really wonder.

Hope this post isn't too long and helps someone. Or at least provokes further discussion, dialogue and makes us think.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: ferrell

I was diagnosed with Picks disease about a year ago. Doctors prescribed Namenda and Strattera. However due to all the negative effects with Namenda on people with an FTD/Lewy Bodied Dementia, I have not taken it. I was also scheduled to have a surgery unrelated to my brain. Again, anesthesia and FTD's don't seem to go well together.
Does anyone here have experience with Picks/FTD/Lewy Bodied dementia and anesthesia and Namenda?
Thanks for your help.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Caroleee

I have put my Mom back on Aricept too. It was not supposed to be helpful in the later stages of Alzheimers, but she went into a HUGE decline within a week of going off Aricept. I hope that she will be able to regain what she lost.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: S. H.

I posted about how did I know my med's were helping me on another thread. I have EOAD I was told April 2008 I waass 57. I had several replies to my question. You may want to go to I have ALZ and ALZ un 65 and read these answeres. I will never know if they are helping, but I am not going to take the chance and stop taking my med's. Be sure and read Lisa's answer where she stopped for three weeks. I don't know If this is much help, but just wanted to reply. Sorry for all you are going through. This is terrible for a family.

Sharon
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: DebZ

Kat - definitely go back to the 5mg and see how that goes. Namenda works wonderfully for some, but not for all. My bro was one of the latter - we stopped it after a few weeks. To repeat from my above post, one of the side effects of Namenda is CONFUSION!!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Zirdob

Sandy - Thank you for your insightful post. I know most of us caregivers feel as you did when you took care of your grandmother. It can be very stressful, but also very rewarding. My dad has been a great father and would do anything for me. I couldn't imagine not doing the same for him.

Like yourself, dad's condition seems to have stabilized/improved with twice daily doses of Razadyne & Namenda and we have hope for the new treatments on the horizon. (Dad's in the Flurizan Phase III study.)

It must be particularly difficult with EOAD. Keep enjoying life and knowing how important you are to your family and the rest of us who understand how difficult this disease can be.

Take care! Bill
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: smokey244

My Granny is in stage 6 ad, and the doctors just started her on nemenda, about 3 weeks ago. I can not tell that it is helping, she seems to be worse than staying the same. I Just wonder if she needs to start taking the namenda at this late stage. She doesn't really have a life, because all she can really do is sit there. AD has started affecting her walking. I don't think that she needs to be on anythingt that would prolong this misrable disease. I love her very much, and that is why I don't wnat to prolong it. That is no way to live.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: nette

My dad is 90 and has had alzheimers for the last 5 years. The first of the year we placed him in a private board and care as my 93 year old step mom refused to let us place him in a safe and nurturing home earlier. Emergency pace maker surgery changed her mind as she was worn out! She too has a caregiver (family friend) who lives with her. Dad is also diabetic which only complicates things further. Two weeks ago his doctor decided to take him off both Namenda and Aricpet as she felt it was no longer needed at this stage in his life. He is in stage 7. Today his caregiver called saying he is back to the behavior he displayed when he first moved in. He is extremely agitated, not sleeping, showing aggressive behavior and trying to take his clothes off. I immediately called the doctor and he is back on both Namenda and Aricept. We decided the meds must have been doing something and we wouldn't have known exactly what had we not taken him off them. I was also told no "weaning" of these meds were necessary but today I discovered (and shared with the doctor) that he should have been taken off of them one at a time.
This disease is certainly a learning curve.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Caroleee

Sandy - thanx for responding. Whatever you are doing, it seems right! You are very coherent still, and yes we all have episodes.

Don't worry that someone would discontinue your meds for no good reason. We certainly would not with my Mom either. We are just concerned with side effects and are skeptical about whether they are helping. We are closely evaluating every day whether there is any backsliding without the drugs. She is on soo many, I really think it is worth a try. Best wishes. Carole
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Betsy

Thank you all for sharing your experiences. My mom is on Exelon and Namenda (has been for several years) and I have recently begun to wonder if they are doing her any good. I toyed with asking her doc about removing the meds, but I think I'll let well enough alone. Thanks again.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Caroleee

Thanx Steven for your thoughtful comments. Makes me curious to see what will happen when in 1 1/2 weeks we take Mom off Namenda. She has now been off Aricept for five days. No change. (Incidentally, I checked with the dr. and the pharmacist and the website, and found no information recommending weaning.)

How did you get a diagnosis for your Mom, Steven? Mom's doctor indicated that it would probably not be until autopsy to determine if this is really Alzheimers. To date, he calls it Alzheimer's type dementia.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: K.L.C.

to JAB: Very helpful info. To answer your question, My dad turned 85 this past August.

SAM: something to think about. That is kind of what we were thinking. We will continue to investigate.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 4:08 AM
Originally posted by: Caroleee

Thanx Terri. You are NOT awful, as I am sure you know. NO ONE knows, so sometimes this trip just has to be a flight by the seat of our pants.

The doctor is taking my Mom off Aricept today. We will evaluate for two weeks. If all goes well, then we will take her off Namenda. Wellbutrin got stopped last week. Next I plan to tackle neurontin for nighttime cramps.

I will post what happens.

Mom has this awful awful jerking. I looked on the internet and called it myonic jerking. But I wonder if it could be from all of the meds? Has anyone else's loved one had this? They are frequent and strong, and worse when she is agitated, but also happened when she is calm. She is now on klonipin for these, which has helped alot.
 
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